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Best girls high school basketball player in all 50 states - HIGHSCORE
Best girls high school basketball player in all 50 states
The end of November historically means it's time to look toward the upcoming high school basketball season. Yet, plenty of questions surround the start of the high school basketball season as COVID-19 numbers spike across the country.

Still, a number of states have already forged ahead with their hardwood schedules while many more plan to tip-off shortly.

MaxPreps is gearing up for games amid the uncertain time in the country. We've already dropped our preseason MaxPrep Top 25 rankings, and earlier this week announced the top high school basketball team in all 50 states. Today, we take a look at the individuals who stand out in each state.

Top stars Azzi Fudd, Saniya Rivers, Jersey Wolfenbarger and Aaliyah Moore are among the headliners, with plenty of talent spread throughout the country.

Read on to see who took home the top spot in your state.
Jersey Wolfenbarger, Northside
File photo by Michael Woods
Jersey Wolfenbarger, Northside
Alabama
Sara Puckett, Sr., Muscle Shoals
A 6-foot-2 forward who's solid inside and out, Puckett is just as comfortable in transition as she is in the half-court. She'll take her all-around game to Tennessee next year.

Alaska
Sayvia Sellers, So., Anchorage Christian (Anchorage)
An athletic point guard who can score at the rim or from the perimeter, Sellers runs the show for Alaska's top team. Expect college coaches to figure out how to fly to Anchorage sooner rather than later.

Arkansas
Jersey Wolfenbarger, Sr., Northside (Fort Smith)
One of the top players in the country, a 6-5 guard who can distribute and score — and who will make Arkansas a lot better when she arrives next year.

Arizona
Jennah Isai, Jr., Valley Vista (Surprise)

A tough, physical 6-0 combo guard who can not only get her own shots, but makes everyone around her better. She's a big reason Valley Vista starts the season in the MaxPreps Top 25.

California
Juju Watkins, So., Windward (Los Angeles)

You'd think that a state as big as California would have some outstanding seniors — and it does — but the 6-0 sophomore is the complete package, and the Golden State's best heading into 2020-21.

Connecticut
Allie Palmieri, Sr., Greens Farms Academy (Greens Farms)

She averaged 24.2 points and 8 rebounds last year, which made it easy for Boston College to decide to sign the 5-9 guard.

Colorado
Lauren Betts, Jr., Grandview (Aurora)

At 6-7, it's not surprising that Betts is a rim protector, but she can get up and down the court as well. And in an age of 3-point specialists, she's a force on the block.

District of Columbia
Azzi Fudd, Sr., St. John's (Washington, D.C.)

Fudd can do it all at both ends of the floor, which is why she's everyone's preseason pick as Player of the Year, and the prize recruit for Geno Auriemma and UConn.

Delaware
India Johnston, Sr., Caravel (Bear)

The athletic, aggressive 5-8 point guard, a Towson State signee, is too much for the rest of the Diamond State to handle.

Florida
O' Mariah Gordon, Sr., Braden River (Bradenton)

Think Allen Iverson, but more willing to give the ball up, and you've got a mental picture of the 5-5 Florida State signee.

Georgia
Raven Johnson, Sr., Westlake (Atlanta)

If you like winning, you like Johnson, who will do whatever it takes — score, defend, pass — to get the W. Dawn Staley and South Carolina are excited to have her for next season.

Hawaii
Lily Lefotu Wahinekapu, Jr., 'Iolani (Honolulu)

Wahinekapu is another in a long line of tough, talented Hawaii guards who make it clear there's plenty of talent in the middle of the Pacific.

Idaho
Naya Ojukwu, Jr., Mountain View (Meridian)

Meridian went 29-4 last year, and Ojukwu, a 6-1 athletic power forward who controls the paint, was a big reason why.

Illinois
Greta Kampschroeder, Sr., Naperville North (Naperville)

A consummate scoring guard who can dish when needed, Kampschroeder will take her all-around game to Oregon State next year.

Indiana
Ayanna Patterson, Jr., Homestead (Fort Wayne)

Homestead was 29-2 last year, and the 6-2 Patterson — who adds a mid-range jumper to her heavy lifting around the basket — looks to keep the Spartans in Indiana's upper echelon again this season.
Ayanna Patterson, Homestead
File photo by Julie Brown
Ayanna Patterson, Homestead
Iowa
Grace Larkins, Sr., Southeast Polk (Pleasant Hill)

Larkins is a feisty, attacking guard who led Southeast Polk to a 19-5 record last season — and she'll play for South Dakota in 2021-22.

Kansas
Payton Verhulst, Sr., Bishop Miege (Shawnee Mission)

She's smooth, skilled and versatile, and was a major contributor to Bishop Miege's 21-2 record last year. She'll play for Louisville next season.

Kentucky
Brooklyn Miles, Sr., Franklin County (Frankfort)

An athletic point guard who attacks the basket — even if she is only 5-6 — Miles will play for Tennessee in 2021-22.

Louisiana
Mikaylah Williams, So., Parkway (Bossier City)

Just a sophomore, scouts consider Williams college-ready right now. She averaged 20 points and nine rebounds a game as a freshman for a 24-win team, so clearly her name is one to remember.

Maine
Emily Archibald, Sr., Kennebunk

A 6-2 power forward, Archibald averaged 13.5 rebounds a game to go along 20.0 points and 3.5 assists, so it's not a surprise Providence snapped her up.

Massachusetts
Caroline Ducharme, Sr., Noble & Greenough (Dedham)

A 6-2 wing who can shoot is special, but Ducharme has an all-around game to go along with the sweet stroke. She'll play for UConn next season.

Maryland
Saylor Poffenbarger, Sr., Middletown

At 6-2, Poffenbarger is a guard, not a post, and she's a shooting guard at that. She's also a solid all-around player who will join a loaded UConn freshman class next year.

Michigan
Damiya Hagemann, Sr., Edison Academy (Detroit)

Edison has emerged as one of the top teams in the country the last few seasons, and it's no coincidence that the 5-8 Hegemann's arrival to play the point occurred at the same time. She'll play for Michigan State.

Minnesota
Adalia McKenzie, Sr., Park Center (Brooklyn Park)

McKenzie is proof there's more to Minnesota basketball than Hopkins, as the Illinois signee averaged 31 points and 11 rebounds a game for 24-5 Park Center.

Missouri
Bella Fontleroy, Jr., Kickapoo (Springfield)

A 6-1 wing, Fontleroy can get to the rim and finish in the mid-range, but is especially effective in transition.

Mississippi
Debreasha Powe, Jr., Meridian

Meridian went 29-2 last year, thanks in great part to Powe, a 6-0 wing who uses her athleticism to attack the basket.

Montana
Mya Hansen, Jr., Billings Central Catholic (Billings)

A polished lead guard who can shoot it, Hansen led Billings Central to a 21-2 record, and has already committed to the Lady Griz of Montana.

North Carolina
Saniya Rivers, Sr., Ashley (Wilmington)

Rivers' high school stats match her elite ranking — 25.0 points, 11.7 rebounds, 4.2 assists, 6.3 steals per game — which is why Dawn Staley is ecstatic to have her signed with South Carolina.

North Dakota
Logan Nissley, So., Century (Bismarck)

Nissley does it all for Century, which went 21-4 last year. The 5-10 combo guard can pass, score and rebound, and has three more years to bedevil opposing teams in North Dakota.

Nebraska
Allison Weidner, Sr., St. Francis (Humphrey)

An explosive slasher who plays hard, Weidner is the engine that drives St. Francis (25-3 last year) — and the 5-9 guard will bring the same package to Nebraska next season.

New Hampshire
Isabella King, Sr., Bedford

King, a 5-8 guard, not only is a shooter, she's also a rebounder — and the combination of skills is one reason she's signed with Bucknell.

New Jersey
Olivia Miles, Sr. Blair Academy (Blairstown)

Many consider Miles the USA Basketball point guard of the future, as she shines at every level of competition (club, high school, USA Basketball). Notre Dame looks for that trend to continue in college basketball next year.

New Mexico
Viane Cumber, Sr. Sandia (Albuquerque)

Cumber averaged 22.4 points, 10.6 rebounds and 2.5 assists for 21-5 Sandia last year, but her college destination is unclear after she decommitted from Texas Tech.

Nevada
Aaliyah Gayles, Jr., Spring Valley (Las Vegas)

Gayles is that unusual point guard who not only can score and dish, but also rebounds (6.4 a game last year for a good Spring Valley team). Given her size (5-8) and athleticism, look for more of the same this season.

New York
Sonia Citron, Sr., Ursuline (New Rochelle)

Citron doesn't dazzle, she just does everything really well — and at 6-1, she's not only a stalwart for USA Basketball youth teams, she's expected to step right in at Notre Dame next year.

Ohio
KK Bransford, Jr., Mount Notre Dame (Cincinnati)

At 5-10, Bransford doesn't profile as a power player, but that's exactly who she is. She uses her strength and physicality to get to the rim, and is pretty much unstoppable at the high school level.

Oklahoma
Aaliyah Moore, Sr., Moore

No, they didn't name the high school after her, but Aaliyah Moore has definitely made an impression with her size (6-2) and physical play around the rim. She'll go to Texas next year.

Oregon
Audrey Roden, Sr., West Linn

Roden does a lot of things well, and plays bigger than her 5-8 size would suggest, which adds rebounding to her ability to score (17.2 ppg), pass and defend. She's committed to Nevada.
Audrey Roden, West Linn
File photo by Mark Jones
Audrey Roden, West Linn
Pennsylvania
Aislin Malcolm, Jr., Chartiers Valley (Bridgeville)

Malcolm has the usual statistical profile for players on this list, but there's one fact that sets her apart: She has not lost a game in her high school career.

Rhode Island
Amaya Dowdy, Sr., St. Raphael Academy (Pawtucket)

Dowdy is a physical power forward who gets a lot done in the paint, but she's also versatile enough to make plays on the perimeter. She will play for UMass-Lowell next season.

South Carolina
Milaysia Fulwiley, So., Keenan (Columbia)

Fulwiley's dazzling numbers as a freshman — 26.4 ppg, 7.3 rpg, 6.3 apg, 6.1 spg — are impressive, and she passes the eye test with flying colors as well. She's one of the top recruits in the country in the Class of 2023.

South Dakota
Ndjakalenga Mwenentanda, Jr., Washington (Sioux Falls)

The game is as long as the name, as Mwenentanda uses her 6-1 size to attack the rim, and her athleticism to make an impact all over the floor.

Tennessee
Denae Fritz, Sr., Maryville

The 5-11 wing averaged 21 points and 11 rebounds a game last season, but her intensity and versatility add even more value. She'll play for Iowa State next season.

Texas
Rori Harmon, Sr., Cypress Creek (Houston)

Harmon can shoot (38 percent from 3-point distance), score (15.6 ppg), pass (5.2 apg) and at 5-8, rebound (5.6 rpg). She's committed to Texas.

Utah
Timea Gardiner, Jr., Fremont (Plain City)

At 6-2, Gardiner is a force inside, delivering 14.7 ppg and 6.7 rpg last year. But even more impressive for a post (or any other position) was her 87 percent from the free-throw line.

Vermont
Catherine Gilwee, Sr., Champlain Valley Union (Hinesburg)

A 5-6 point guard, Gilwee ran the show for unbeaten Champlain Valley Union last season, and added 3-point marksmanship as well. She'll play for Vermont next year.

Virginia
Aziaha James, Sr., Princess Anne (Virginia Beach)

James did it all for powerhouse Princess Anne last year — 18.7 ppg, 8.7 rpg, 4.7 spg — and North Carolina State will be looking for more of the same in 2021-22.

Washington
Talia Von Oelhoffen, Sr., Chiawana (Pasco)

Von Oelhoffen, who committed to Oregon State after averaging 26.2 ppg last year, has athleticism in her genes: Her father Kimo played in the NFL for 14 years.

West Virginia
Dionna Gray, Jr., Huntington

Gray transferred from St. Joseph Central, a nationally ranked team last year, and immediately upgraded the Huntington program. The 5-3 floor general is quick, active, athletic and has a high basketball IQ.

Wisconsin
Maty Wilke, Sr., Beaver Dam

The best player on the state's perennial powerhouse, Wilke has a smooth jumper but also is fine with seeking out contact. She's committed to Wisconsin.

Wyoming
Brenli Jenkins, Jr., Rock Springs

At 5-7, Jenkins is a point guard who can handle, shoot and get to the rim, which gives opponents few options. She's also a solid defender, which just adds to the package.
Ohio releases 'Return to Play Recommendations' for Aug. 1 high school sports start - HIGHSCORE
Ohio releases 'Return to Play Recommendations' for Aug. 1 high school sports start
Hours after Gov. Mike DeWine on Wednesday mandated masks in all 88 counties, the Ohio High School Athletic Association sent a 22-page "Return to Play Recommendations" memo to member schools with additional sport-specific suggestions to combat the COVID-19 pandemic for the fall calendar. Practices for the Ohio fall sports season start Aug. 1.

"The OHSAA fully intends to support its member schools and the student-athletes who desire to compete in interscholastic athletics and will continue to assess all areas as more information becomes available," OHSAA interim executive director Bob Goldring said.

The guidelines — created via input from a myriad of state agencies and the National Federation of State High School Associations — won't supplant orders, mandates or requirements imposed by DeWine or the Ohio Department of Health.

The memo, which comes a day after the Ohio High School Football Coaches Association released a 38-page safety protocol proposal to its membership, includes plans for pre-participation screening, positive tests and travel considerations. It also features details on game-day operations including officials, event staff, spectators, bands, cheerleaders and concessions.

General guidelines for all sports include maintaining social distancing when not on the field or court, using face coverings while not competing, and dialing back or cutting unnecessary travel. It also recommends reducing or eliminating sharing of common equipment, and limiting contact frequency with student-athletes from schools and non-interscholastic programs outside of each school's league, conference or normal competition sphere.

Specific recommendations for football include extending the team box on both sides of the field to the 10-yard lines and having offensive players take the ball back to the huddle between snaps while officials would mark the line of scrimmage with a bean bag.

Staggered start times in cross country and nullifying switching benches between sets in volleyball were suggested.

Postgame handshakes in all sports will be eliminated.

"The OHSAA understands that the physical and mental benefits of participation in education-based interscholastic athletics are numerous and are heightened even more during this pandemic," Goldring said. "There is no doubt that the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has already resulted in thousands of our students missing out on these life-shaping educational experiences over the past several months, and we certainly hope we can return to some type of normalcy as it relates to interscholastic athletics soon."

Three of the OHSAA's fall sports have been acknowledged as low contact, including boys and girls golf, girls tennis and volleyball. Those sports can have competitions between schools.

Competitions between schools in football, boys and girls soccer, boys and girls cross country, and field hockey have not yet been approved.

"We just don't know yet," DeWine said. "Our ability to play sports and go back to school depends on what we do in the next few weeks."
Ohio introduced "Return to Play Recommendations" on Thursday for fall sports.
File photo by Jeff Harwell
Ohio introduced "Return to Play Recommendations" on Thursday for fall sports.
Ohio high school football in 2020: Individual water bottles, sideline social distancing and endless hand sanitizer - HIGHSCORE
Ohio high school football in 2020: Individual water bottles, sideline social distancing and endless hand sanitizer
As state associations and federations around the country wrestle with how to deal with football in the fall during a global pandemic, one organization in Ohio has unleashed an exhaustive, and detailed, 37-page guideline packet. The Ohio High School Football Coaches Association has done its homework with its document featuring an opening statement, table of contents, 28 diagrammed photos, eight colored graphics and 84 bullet points.

The longtime organization with more than 3,000 members included such topics as practice and travel plans, COVID responses, fan protocols, and courses of action.

The OHSFCA is not an official governing body like the Ohio High School Athletic Association, but its recommendations are heard and often followed. 

Its opening statement cites a growing concern in the behavioral and mental health of players due to social distancing because of COVID-19. The organization is on a "mission to promote (football) by recommending the use of the safest, most medically sound and best practices in teaching skills to athletes. It is our belief that the mental health of young (athletes) who play football can be negatively affected by eliminating football for 2020." So to get it going, here are some of its more interesting findings and bullet-point proposals, which includes endless references to sanitizing and social-distance protocols.

• An 80-yard sideline — 10-yard-line to 10-yard-line — for each team to give more social distancing.

• Single practice sessions will not exceed three hours during the preseason.

• No practice to exceed 2 hours, 15 minutes during the season.

• Prior to the game, each player must have his own water bottle, which is to filled from a central location. Trainer or designee will be responsible for water bottle refills.

• Pregame, during, and after the game, all team personnel shall refrain from sharing towels, water, apparel or equipment.

• During coin toss, limit attendees to the referee, umpire and one designated representative from each team.

• For games, players should bring four T-shirts — plastic bags should be provided for the player to put shirts in when changed — one for pregame, first half, second half and post game.

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS RE-START: Updates from all 50 states

•  Only team members can be in the team box. Everyone that is a team member and not in a uniform must have a team box pass. Injured player with jersey only will count as uniform.

•  Team personnel will be responsible for sanitizing footballs per sideline. Footballs will be rotated and sanitized as often as possible during the game.

•  Every six minutes of game clock time there will be a two-minute break to help eliminate continuous contact for 15 minutes. Players will sanitize their hands during timeouts.

•  Opposing teams should avoid use of the locker room when possible and used only for restroom breaks and hazardous weather.

•  No handshakes after the game.

•  For fans, the temperature of each will be taken as they enter the game. They must exit following the game with no congregating at any point.

•  Under general rules,  Before, during and after the contest, players, coaches, game officials, team personnel
and game administration officials should wash and sanitize their hands as often as possible.

•  No touch rule — players should refrain from high fives and other physical contact with teammates, opposing players, coaches, officials, and fans.

On a final note, the OHSFCA made a case that football isn't as much a contact sport as most consider.

"An average play lasts 4-to-6 seconds," it wrote. "Based on this study, an offensive lineman whose contact ratio is 100 percent every play, will average a little over five minutes of continuous contact per game if they play every play on the offensive side of the ball. Likewise, a defensive lineman, whose contact ratio is 100 percent per play, will also average a little over five minutes of continuous contact per game if they play every play on the defensive side of the ball. Based on these averages, no player on either football team will incur over 11 minutes of continuous contact, which is under the CDC guidelines of no more than 15 minutes of continuous contact."
There likely won't be a lot of closely gathered team charges before any 2020 games in Ohio.
Photo by Scott Reed
There likely won't be a lot of closely gathered team charges before any 2020 games in Ohio.
Girls high school basketball rankings: No. 21 Valley Vista returns to HIGHSCORE Top 25 after Arizona reverses course on season - HIGHSCORE
Girls high school basketball rankings: No. 21 Valley Vista returns to MaxPreps Top 25 after Arizona reverses course on season
There has never been a season like this one — and hopefully there never will be again.

Though some teams have been able to play a nearly full schedule, others have yet to start, and many key games have been canceled. The result? The Top 25, which always contains a fair amount of guesswork, is even more chancy than in the past. As always, we are sure the 25 we've listed are very good teams, and they deserve full respect for their achievements, but it must be noted that a lot of teams that might have been on this list aren't likely to play.

In fact, No. 24 Chiawana may drop out next week if Washington cancels its season, and California's governing body meets Jan. 25 to determine if the Golden State's teams will even be allowed to play in the spring. And yet, at the same time, No. 21 Valley Vista returned the rankings after the state of Arizona reversed course and allowed the basketball season to be played.

So who knows what's next? We don't, that's for sure, but all credit to the coaches, players and staff who've made it this far, whether they're in the Top 25 or not.

(NOTE: Please update schedules and results on MaxPreps. If there are issues, please reach out to [email protected] for assistance.)

MaxPreps Top 25 Girls High School Basketball Rankings

Record: 11-0 | Last week: 1
A key game against powerful Plant scheduled for Saturday has been canceled. The Highlanders have played one game in 2021. It's hoped the Jan. 29 matchup with Colonial will mark the No. 1 team's return to action.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 2
Several Washington Catholic Athletic Conference teams have canceled their seasons, but the Mustanges are set to begin play Feb. 3 against Elizabeth Seton.

Record: 11-0 | Last week: 3
A big win Monday over strong Forest Park cements Lions' No. 3 ranking. Next up is a rematch Jan. 26 with a solid Langston Hughes team.

Record: 1-0 | Last week: 4
One of the most talented teams in the country, the Royals have begun league play. There may not be many tests the rest of the way, but at least Hopkins is playing again.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 5
The Pioneers are set to begin play Jan. 27.

Record: 15-0 | Last week: 6
The Cougars finish the regular season with four games against teams it handled easily the first time around.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 7
Though the Cadets have been playing as a club team, none of the results are official. It's anticipated St. John's will be able to play as a high school in the near future.

Record: 12-0 | Last week: 8
The Red Knights beat Westminster Christian by four the first time around, so Friday's rematch could be a serious test.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 9
The Lancers get in the mix Jan. 21 against Raritan, but right now, the schedule calls for only 11 games.

Record: 19-0 | Last week: 10
The Cougars rolled over previously unbeaten Jersey Village 92-31 but Memorial and Cypress Ridge could be more of a challenge. Or not.

Record: 7-0 | Last week: 11
Oklahoma is loaded this year, but so far the Tigers look to the best. But Sooner State fans are already circling Feb. 11, when Classen SAS comes to Norman.

Record: 15-0 | Last week: NR
With wins over Wayne and Reynoldsburg — among others — the Wildcats jump into the Top 25 as Ohio's best. But Pickerington Central is the Jan. 20 opponent, so there's not much margin for error.

Record: 11-0 | Last week: 13
The Redskins play in a local tournament this weekend, and then draws 10-4 Bixby on Tuesday.

Record: 13-1 | Last week: 14
The Eagles get a serious test against 16-1 Plant on Friday, but there are only two more regular season games after that.

Record: 21-0 | Last week: 16
Hoover's game with perennial Georgia power St. Francis was canceled, but with 22-1 Hazel Green on the schedule Saturday, the Buccaneers have another chance to show just how good they are.

Record: 10-0 | Last week: 18
The Tigers have been on a break, but jump right in against 8-1 Father Ryan next Tuesday.

Record: 4-2 | Last week: 17
Next up for talented New Hope is Paul VI on Jan. 28, but it's possible coach Sam Caldwell will find some willing opponents before then.

Record: 12-0 | Last week: 20
The Silverwolves jump two spots, but 10-1 Syracuse, Friday's opponent, will show whether they deserved the bump.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 19
The Argonauts begin the season Feb. 2

Record: 14-1| Last week: 21
The Eagles' ranking is a reflection of a very talented roster, but to keep it, a Saturday win over No. 23 Duncanville, at home, is mandatory.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: NR
Despite mounting COVID cases, Arizona's high school association reversed its decision to cancel winter sports — which means the Monsoon not only jump back into the rankings, but will play three games in the next week.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 22
The Vikings plan to begin Jan. 29, and will face an "early" test Feb. 2 vs. Neumann-Goretti.

Record: 19-1 | Last week: 23
The Panthers have already lost to DeSoto once, and now must try to deal with DeSoto's height and talent on the road.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 24
Even if the Riverhawks are given permission to play, star Talia Von Oelhoffen graduated early so she could start playing at Oregon State — which will make it very hard for Chiawana to hang on to this spot even if Washington allows basketball.

Record: 10-0 | Last week: 25
The talented Wildcats have a fairly easy week ahead, though it's always tough to play three games in that span of time, as Mississippi's best must do.

Dropped out: No. 12 Reynoldsburg (Ohio), No. 15 Sidwell Friends (Washington D.C.) season canceled.
High school basketball: With COVID-19 guidelines limiting indoor activity, games in Washington's Pierce County being played in livestock arena - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: With COVID-19 guidelines limiting indoor activity, games in Washington's Pierce County being played in livestock arena
With local guidelines restricting indoor activity amid the pandemic, athletic directors, coaches and local businesses got creative to save the high school basketball season in Washington's Pierce County.

Games finally got underway Wednesday on the grounds of the Washington State Fair in Puyallup in a venue typically reserved for equestrian activities, livestock shows, auctions and swap meets.

The arena has a roof but opens on both ends, allowing the basketball games to be played and skirting the limit on indoor gatherings. Puyallup-based Looker Asphalt paved the arena floor in recent days in order to make it possible to lay down courts.
Curtis (University Place) athletic director Suzanne Vick told KJR 950 on Wednesday that nearly 400 games are scheduled to be played on three courts featuring boys and girls teams from the South Puget Sound League and Pierce County League.

Spectators aren't permitted this week but Vick said she hopes two guests per uniformed player will be allowed in the near future.

Thankfully, the area's unpredictable spring weather is doing its part to cooperate. Temperatures are expected to remain in the 70s through the weekend.
Two junior varsity girls games were the first to be played on the newly installed courts Wednesday afternoon.
Photo by Vince Miller
Two junior varsity girls games were the first to be played on the newly installed courts Wednesday afternoon.
Photo by Vince Miller
A Rogers player takes a shot during one of the two junior varsity girls games.
Photo by Vince MIller
A Rogers player takes a shot during one of the two junior varsity girls games.
Photo by Vince Miller
Dane Looker (right) of Looker Asphalt and Greg Barrett work to finish installing the courts in time for the first games that were held Wednesday afternoon.
Photo by Vince Miller
Dane Looker (right) of Looker Asphalt and Greg Barrett work to finish installing the courts in time for the first games that were held Wednesday afternoon.
Photo by Vince MIller