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High school baseball: Greatest coach from every state - OFFICIAL
High school baseball: Greatest coach from every state
Some have been fixtures in the third base coaches box for more than 50 years. Many of them have won more than 1,000 games in their career. All of them are among the nation's greatest high school baseball coaches of all-time.

MaxPreps is identifying the Greatest Baseball Coach of All-Time in Each State and the list is an impressive one. John Stevenson of El Segundo, who coached MLB great George Brett; Mike Cameron of Archbishop Moeller, who mentored Hall of Famer Ken Griffey Jr.; and Rodger Fairless of Green Valley, who coached Hall of Fame pitcher Greg Maddux, are just some of the names found among the 50 Greats from 50 States.
Mike Woods, Hamilton baseball coach
File photo by Mark Jones
Mike Woods, Hamilton baseball coach
Greatest high school baseball coach from every state

Alabama
William Booth, Hartselle

He became the winningest coach in the state in 2006 when he won his 648th game, topping previous state record holder Sammy Dunn of Vestavia Hills. That was 15 years ago and Booth is still going strong. He's upped that win total to 1,095 (including the 2021 season) with 488 losses. He's won eight state championships at Hartselle.

Alaska
Ed Conway, Sitka

Conway led Sitka, a small school with an enrollment of under 400, to multiple large school championships, winning three in a row between 2005-07. After 20 years at Sitka, Conway won his final game, capturing the state championship with an 11-10 win over two-time defending state champion South (Anchorage).

Arizona
Mike Woods, Hamilton (Chandler)

The most successful coach in Arizona over the past quarter century, Woods is the only baseball coach the Huskies have ever had. He had a record of 504-197 entering the 2021 season and his teams have won seven state championships. Hamilton was also ranked No. 1 in the nation by MaxPreps when COVID ended the 2020 season. Hamilton is ranked No. 10 in the MaxPreps Top 25.

Arkansas
Billy Bock, Pine Bluff

He reportedly never had a losing season at the four schools where he coached. He sprinkled nine state championships between St. Anne's Academy, Sylvan Hills, Arkansas High and Pine Bluff. He set a state record with four straight state championships at the latter school (1983-86) coupled with the one at Arkansas (1982) to give him five in a row. He finished his career 641-121.

California
John Stevenson, El Segundo

No California coach has more wins than Stevenson, who coached El Segundo for 50 years and went 1,059-419. He won 30 league championships and seven Southern Section crowns. Among his top players were Hall of Fame third baseman George Brett, his brother Ken Brett and pitcher Scott McGregor.

Colorado
Jim Danley, Eaton

He oversaw one of the top small school teams in the nation, posting a record of 807-162-2 in 45 years as head coach. He led the Fightin' Reds to 29 Final Four appearances, 23 straight regional titles, 11 state championships and 36 league championships.

Connecticut
John Fontana, Southington

Fontana coached 41 years for the Blue Knights and produced a program that went 669-157 during his tenure for an .810 winning percentage. His teams won 24 conference championships and a pair of state titles. His 1999 team finished the season ranked No. 44 in the nation by Baseball America.

Delaware
Matt Smith, St. Mark's (Wilmington)

Although he's coached 22 seasons, Smith is closing in quickly on the all-time wins record in Delaware. He has 383 wins while the all-time record for the state is 496. Smith has also led St. Mark's to 10 of their 14 baseball state championships.

District of Columbia
Eddie Saah, Wilson

He established a District of Columbia dynasty at Wilson, winning 27 straight DCIAA championships. Saah coached 16 years, won 16 DCIAA championships and had a league record of 210-1.

Florida
Rich Hoffman, Westminster Christian (Miami), Westminster Academy (Fort Lauderdale)

Coaching at two different schools during the late 1990s, Hoffman led Westminster Christian to three straight state championships and a national title by Baseball America. He took the job at Westminster Academy and won two more state championships, for five in a row. The high school coach of Alex Rodriguez, Hoffman won 1,020 games in his career to go with 10 state titles. Two of his teams (1992 and 1996 Westminster Christian) have been named national champions.

Georgia
Bobby Howard, Columbus

The state's all-time winningest coach with 1,008 wins (heading into the 2021 season), Howard spent 31 seasons at Columbus, where he led the Blue Devils to 12 state championships.

Hawaii
Erik Kadooka, Punahou (Honolulu)

Punahou dominated under the leadership of Kadooka in the early 2000s. He led the Buff ‘n Blue to seven straight state championships between 2004 to 2010.

Idaho
Dwight Church, Lewiston

Coached the high school and American Legion teams from 1954 to the 1970s. He led the high school team to seven state championships and had a career record of 673-231. As an American Legion coach, he won 23 state championships, including 12 in a row. His high school and legion record combined was 2,427-889.

Illinois
Percy Moore, Lane Tech (Chicago)

At the height of Lane Tech's dominance in the 1920s and 30s, Moore had as many as 733 players try out for the team. Moore coached 29 years at Lane Tech, winning 13 City League championships and losing only two section championships. His team also played in the New York-Chicago Inter-City championship four times between 1920 and 1926, winning twice.

Indiana
Dave Pishkur, Andrean (Merrillville)

The 2019 season was a big one for Pishkur as he won a state championship, won 35 straight games, went over 1,000 career wins and became the all-time winningest coach in state history. He began the 2021 season with a record of 1,014-284 in 40 years with seven state championships.

Iowa
Gene Schulz, Kee (Lansing)

Schulz is the all-time national leader in spring/summer baseball wins with 1,578 victories. He has 1,754 wins in summer and fall seasons combined with a winning percentage of .815 (1,754-398). He also won a total of 11 state championships, nine of them in the spring/summer, with his 1973 squad going 48-0.

Kansas
Mike Watt, St. Mary's-Colgan (Pittsburg)

The American Baseball Coaches Association national coach of the year in 2016 after winning his 16th state championship, Watt is also a member of the Kansas Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame. His team won seven straight state championships in the 2000s and added four straight between 2013-16. He has won over 600 career games.

Kentucky
Bill Miller, Pleasure Ridge Park (Louisville)

Guided his team to 1,144 career wins with 305 losses, giving him the most wins in state history when he passed away in the middle of the 2018 season. He won six state championships in Kentucky's one-division playoff system, including three in a row from 1994 to 1996. His 2008 team finished No. 7 in the final national rankings by Baseball America.

Louisiana
Glenn Cecchini, Barbe (Lake Charles)

Ranked as the top team in the state of Louisiana with a 35-2 record, Cecchini is closing in on 1,000 career wins. He has 971 as of last week's sweep of Alexandria in the state playoffs. Cecchini was the National Coach of the Year in 2020 and his team has won four state championships with a No. 1 national ranking in 2014.
Glenn Cecchini, Barbe baseball coach
File photo by Roddy Johnson
Glenn Cecchini, Barbe baseball coach
Maine
Bob Kelley, Bangor

No school has won more state baseball championships than Bangor, and Kelley is the main reason. He coached at the school for 32 seasons, winning 15 East championships and eight state championships.

Maryland
Bernie Walter, Arundel (Gambrills)

Walter won state championships in four different decades as he led the Wildcats to a state record 10 titles in his 37-year career. He ended his career with a record of 609-185.

Massachusetts
Emile Johnson Jr, Leominster

Led 42 of his 43 teams to the state tournament and never had a losing season for the Blue Devils. He set the state record for career wins with 725 and he won three state championships.

Michigan
Larry Tuttle, Blissfield

Earlier this month, Tuttle went over 1,300 career wins. He's closing in on the state's all-time leader, Pat O'Keefe, for the state record. Tuttle has a career mark of 1,312-426-5, as of Wednesday. According to the Daily Telegram, Tuttle has won 39 conference titles, 32 district championships, 23 regional crowns and seven state titles.

Minnesota
Bob Karn, St. Cloud Cathedral (St. Cloud)

He's coached for 50 years and late last month went over 800 career wins. He's already the winningest coach in state history. His teams have won nine state championships, including back-to-back titles in 2014-15. Cathedral had a 58-game win streak during that span and he was the National Coach of the Year by the American Baseball Coaches Association.

Mississippi
Jerry Boatner, West Lauderdale (Collinsville)

Boatner coached baseball for 50 years in Mississippi, 45 of those years at West Lauderdale. He won 14 state championships and he had a record of 1,202-359, the most wins of any coach in the state.

Missouri
Tony Perkins, Howell (St. Charles)

In 22 seasons at Howell, Perkins has reached the state championship game seven times with titles in 2003, 2011, 2013 and 2016. He is 501-225 with 14 conference championships and 10 sectional crowns.

Nebraska
Bill Olson, Omaha Northwest (Omaha)

Northwest dominated Nebraska baseball in the 1980s, winning six state championships, including four in a row from 1982-85. His 1983 team was ranked No. 1 in the nation by Baseball America. He won over 1,500 games between high school and American Legion.

Nevada
Rodger Fairless, Green Valley (Henderson)

In 19 seasons at Green Valley and El Dorado, Fairless produced 12 state championship teams, including six in a row at Green Valley. He also developed future Hall of Fame pitcher Greg Maddux. He had a record of 493-80 at the two schools.

New Hampshire
Tom Underwood, Plymouth

Guided Plymouth for 43 seasons, retiring after the 2015 season. He led Plymouth to six state championships, including three in a row from 1980-82. He retired as the all-time winningest coach in the state with 518 wins.

New Jersey
Ken Frank, Toms River South (Toms River)

The all-time winningest coach in New Jersey, Frank is closing in on 900 wins and reportedly needs four more to hit the milestone. He's won five group championships, 10 sectional titles and 22 division crowns.

New Mexico
Jim Johns, Eldorado (Albuquerque)

Racked up 552 wins and 201 losses to finish third among the state's all-time wins leaders. He also won seven state championships including three straight from 1999 to 2001.

New York
Mike Turo, Monroe Campus (Bronx)

Prior to the 2021 season, Turo had won 35 borough championships in his 42 seasons at Monroe. He also has won six city championships and is 1,369-227.

North Carolina
Henry Jones, Cherryville

Jones's teams made the playoffs in 24 of his 28 seasons, winning six state championships all totaled. He set a Gaston County record with a career total of 542 career wins.

North Dakota
Pete Dobitz, Dickinson

Dobitz has coached at Dickinson since 2000 and led the Midgets to more state titles than any other school in the state, capturing five championships.

Ohio
Mike Cameron, Archbishop Moeller (Cincinnati)

Cameron coached a number of great players, including Hall of Fame players Ken Griffey Jr. and Barry Larkin, during his 39 years at Moeller. He finished his career with a record of 767-303 with four state championships.

Oklahoma
Murl Bowen, Asher

Bowen finished his career as the winningest coach in all of high school baseball when fall and spring seasons are complied. He had a record of 2,115-349 for an .858 winning percentage. He also went 1,063-216 in the spring with 22 state championships. He added 20 state titles in the fall for a total of 43.

Oregon
Dave Gasser, Lakeridge (Lake Oswego), Astoria

Gasser coached at four different schools and won one state title at Madison, two at Lakeridge and two at Astoria. His career record of 750-235 ranks No. 1 in wins in state history.

Pennsylvania
Bob Thomas, Chambersburg

Thomas retired as the state's all-time wins leader with 833 wins in 1,112 games over a 51-year career. He won 22 league championships and three state titles.

Rhode Island
Ed Holloway, Bishop Hendricken (Warwick)

In close to 25 years of coaching the Hawks, Holloway's teams have dominated Rhode Island baseball, winning 16 state championships including five in a row from 2012-2016.

South Carolina
David Horton, Bamberg-Ehrhardt (Bamberg)

The all-time winningest coach in state history, Horton's teams went 889-261 (.773) in his 44 seasons at the helm. Bamberg-Ehrhardt won 14 state championships under Horton, including eight in a row from 1974-1981, tying a national mark for consecutive state championships.

Tennessee
Buster Kelso, Christian Brothers (Memphis)

The state's winningest coach, Kelso has spent 36 seasons at Christian Brothers and led them to nine state championships, including back-to-back titles in 2015-16 and 2000-01. He went over 1,100 wins this year and has 1,107 with 347 losses.

Texas
Steve Chapman, Calallen (Corpus Christi)

Chapman has won nearly 82 percent of his games in 45 seasons at the helm of Calallen. His 1,080 career wins rank second in state history, but is 35 wins behind all-time leader Bobby Moegle (1,115). Chapman has won three state titles and reached the state finals eight times. He also has won 28 district championships and gone to the playoffs 30 straight seasons.

Utah
Bailey Santiseven, Bingham (South Jordan)

Santiseven was a high school coaching pioneer in Utah, getting his start in 1930 and coaching at Bingham for 26 seasons before passing away in 1954. He led Bingham to a state record 12 baseball championships and also won four state titles in football.

Vermont
Orrie Jay, Burlington

The "Orrie Jay" trophy is awarded to the top team in the Metro League each year, in honor of the Burlington coach who led his team to eight state championships, seven runner-up finishes and 16 Northern League crowns in his 30 years of coaching at the school.

Virginia
Mack Shupe, JJ Kelly, now Central (Norton)

Shupe retired in 2009 after 40 years of coaching with a 631-173 record, the second highest total in Virginia history. No coach in the state has won more titles than Shupe, however, as he earned eight championships. He won all of his titles at J.J. Kelly, where he spent 33 of his 40 seasons.

Washington
Kim Cox, DeSales (Walla Walla)

Cox coached for 34 years at De Sales, racking up a record of 670-134 for an .833 winning percentage. He won a state record 19 state championships at the school and made the playoffs 30 years in a row.

West Virginia
John Lowery, Jefferson (Shenandoah Junction)

The only coach Jefferson has ever had, Lowery is in his 50th year at the school (not counting last year's COVID season) and has won 12 state championships. With a 9-0 season to start the 2021 season, Lowery has 1,341 wins and 352 losses and two ties.

Wisconsin
Bruce Erickson, Appleton West (Appleton)

With a record of 500 and 119 in 28 seasons at Appleton West (17) and Appleton North (11), Erickson compiled the highest winning percentage (.808) of any Wisconsin coach with more than 300 career wins. He won four state championships and 20 Fox Valley Conference titles.

Note: Coaches were not chosen for Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming because those states do not sanction high school baseball.
Texas high school football: Klein Cain's four-star running back Jaydon Blue skipping senior season - OFFICIAL
Texas high school football: Klein Cain's four-star running back Jaydon Blue skipping senior season
Klein Cain's (Houston) four-star running back Jaydon Blue announced via Twitter on Thursday that he's forgoing his senior high school football season so he can focus on academics and the next level. The 2022 Texas commit was a first-team MaxPreps Junior All-America selection after rushing for 2,155 yards and 30 touchdowns in 11 games last fall.

He helped lead the Hurricanes to an 8-3 record and rushed for at least 200 yards in six games. Blue accounted for over 1,600 yards on the ground and 16 scores as sophomore.

"Football is a brutal sport, and the wear and tear associated with the RB position is undeniable... I plan to take this time to focus on my academics while enhancing my off-field training," Blue stated on Twitter. "This is an incremental step in hopes of one day fulfilling my NFL dream."

Blue showed during his high school career that he has a bright future ahead to potentially be a big-time running at the college and NFL level. He was the top-rated running back on 247Sports for the Class of 2022 and was the No. 31 overall prospect.

He leads a strong 2022 class at Texas and committed to the Longhorns a month after Steve Sarkisian was hired in January.

Other notable commits include Serra (Gardena, Calif.) four-star quarterback Maalik Murphy, Aledo (Texas) four-star safety Bryan Allen Jr., Lewisville (Texas) four-star wide receiver Armani Winfield, Memorial (Port Arthur, Texas) four-star cornerback Jaylon Guilbeau and North Shore (Houston) four-star defensive tackle Kristopher Ross.

Last season, some seniors opted out of playing because of the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty of what a season would look like. Additionally, some states moved the season to the spring and a lot of top-recruits enrolled in college early instead of playing their senior year.

It will be interesting to see if Blue starts a new trend in high school football with more top recruits electing to sit out their senior season to get ready for the next level and eliminate the chance of suffering a serious or career-ending injury.
Jaydon Blue, Klein Cain
Photo by Ken Murray
Jaydon Blue, Klein Cain

OFFICIAL Sophomore All-Americans Matt and Ryan Bewley skip final two year of high school basketball to begin professional career - OFFICIAL
MaxPreps Sophomore All-Americans Matt and Ryan Bewley skip final two year of high school basketball to begin professional career
Overtime Elite (OTE) signed its first high school players Friday, inking five-star West Oaks Academy (Orlando, Fla.) forwards Matthew Bewley and Ryan Bewley, per a report by Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN. The elite Class of 2023 forwards will forgo their high school and college eligibility to join the startup league in September for contracts expected to pay out seven figures for each player over their two year contract.

Matt is regarded as the No. 2 prospect in the Class of 2023 according to 247Sports, while Ryan is ranked No. 16 in the class.
Both players were selected as MaxPreps Sophomore All-Americans last season. Matt Bewley earned first team honors after averaging 17 points, 12 rebounds and three blocks per contest while Ryan Bewley earned honorable mention after averaging 10 points, 10.3 rebounds and two blocks per game.

Overtime Elite, in the process of building a 100,000 square-foot arena and training facility in Atlanta, hired 13-year NBA veteran and national championship-winning coach Kevin Ollie to run the team.

The upstart professional league is offering players a guaranteed minimum of at least $100,000 per year, plus bonuses and shares of equity in Overtime. It also maintains players will participate in revenue from use of their name, image and likeness, including through sales of custom jerseys, trading cards, video games and NFTs.

Overtime has secured $80 million in financial backing from Jeff Bezos, Drake, Alexis Ohanian, Carmelo Anthony, Kevin Durant and others.
Matthew Bewley in action during his freshman year at Northeast.
Photo by Nicholas Koza
Matthew Bewley in action during his freshman year at Northeast.
Greatest high school athlete from all 50 states - OFFICIAL
Greatest high school athlete from all 50 states
Who is better: Jim Brown or Kareem Abdul-Jabbar? Choose between John Elway and Jackie Robinson. How about Bo Jackson or Willie Mays? Those might seem like odd questions, but they are valid topics of conversation when trying to determine the greatest athlete from each state.

MaxPreps has chosen the best athlete from all 50 states, along with the District of Columbia. The criteria is simple: Who has the best overall career from high school to the professional level? While playing more than one sport was helpful, single-sport success did not eliminate an athlete, such as Shaquille O'Neal and Magic Johnson, from consideration.
Ezekiel Elliott played prep football at Burroughs (St. Louis).
File photo by Mark Guthrel
Ezekiel Elliott played prep football at Burroughs (St. Louis).
Greatest high school athlete from all 50 states

Alabama
Bo Jackson, McAdory (McCalla)
One of the few athletes in the last century to play professional baseball and football, a hip injury while playing for the Oakland Raiders cut short Jackson's career. In high school, the future Heisman Trophy winner excelled in football, indoor track and field, and baseball, setting state records in the latter two sports.

Alaska
Carlos Boozer, Juneau-Douglas (Juneau)
The two-time NBA All-Star is the most decorated athlete to come from Alaska. A two-time All-American in high school and a third-team All-American in college, Boozer also won an NCAA championship at Duke and played 14 years in the NBA.

Arizona
Jim Palmer, Scottsdale
The Hall of Fame pitcher won three Cy Young awards and was a three-time World Series champion with the Orioles. In high school, he was an all-state second team receiver at Scottsdale, a first-team all-state basketball selection and one of the state's top pitchers with a 6-2 overall record.

Arkansas
Don Hutson, Pine Bluff
Hutson was way ahead of his time while playing wide receiver in the NFL in the 1930s and 40s with the Green Bay Packers. Despite retiring in 1945, Hutson still holds 13 NFL records. Playing for one of the greatest high school football programs of its day, Hutson earned all-state honors in football and basketball while playing baseball for the local town team.

California
Jackie Robinson, Muir (Pasadena)
Robinson's legendary status and impact on the game of baseball is secure, but it wasn't the only sport he excelled in at the high school level. He was an All-Southland player in basketball and football and helped the track team win a state championship. He enjoyed great success in basketball and football at UCLA before moving on to the Major Leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Colorado
Earl "Dutch" Clark, Pueblo Central (Pueblo)
A Hall of Famer at the high school, college and professional level, Clark was one of the top running backs in the NFL during the league's second decade. He also led the basketball team at Pueblo Central to a state championship and set state records in track and field.

Connecticut
Steve Young, Greenwich
Born in Utah, Young played high school football in Connecticut where he earned all-state honors as a running quarterback. He developed into one of the game's best passing quarterbacks, finishing his NFL career with the game's best passer rating (he now ranks sixth). He also played basketball and baseball in high school.

Delaware
Elena Delle Donne, Ursuline Academy (Wilmington)
Delle Donne ranks as one of the top players in WNBA history and one of the greatest high school girls basketball players of all-time. She is a two-time WNBA MVP, led the nation in scoring while at the University of Delaware and won an Olympic gold medal in 2016. In high school, Delle Donne became the state's all-time leading scorer while leading Ursuline to three state titles. She was the No. 1 recruit in the nation as a senior.
Elena Delle Donne, Ursuline Academy
File photo by Kevin Yen
Elena Delle Donne, Ursuline Academy
District of Columbia
Elgin Baylor, Springarn
By the time Baylor retired from the NBA midway through the 1972 season, he was the league's third all-time leading scorer behind Wilt Chamberlain and Oscar Robertson. He played one year at Springarn and averaged 36.1 points per game in league play.

Florida
Deion Sanders, North Fort Myers
Basketball might have been Sanders' best sport in high school as he averaged 24 points per game. In football, he earned All-Southwest Florida honors as a quarterback while in baseball he went in the sixth round of the MLB draft. He is regarded as one of the NFL's top all-time cornerbacks and also played nine seasons in the Majors.

Georgia
Herschel Walker, Johnson County (Wrightsville)
Although his records have since been broken, Walker was a revelation as a high school running back in Georgia. His 3,167 yards in 1979 broke the previous state record by 600 yards. He also nearly became the first college freshman to win a Heisman Trophy (he later won as a junior). While his NFL career did not match the promise he showed in college, it should be noted that he played three of his prime seasons in the USFL, where he gained 5,562 yards.

Hawaii
Marcus Mariota, St. Louis (Honolulu)
Mariota edges out fellow St. Louis quarterback Tua Tagovailoa for the honor as the state's greatest athlete. Mariota was the state player of the year while leading St. Louis to a state championship. He went on to win the Heisman Trophy at Oregon along with the Davey O'Brien Award and the Maxwell Award. He was the No. 2 overall pick in the 2015 NFL draft and started for the Tennessee Titans before signing with the Raiders.

Idaho
Harmon Killebrew, Payette
Known as one of Major League Baseball's greatest home run hitters with the Minnesota Twins, Killebrew was also a standout football player at Payette. Wigwam Wiseman named Killebrew to its All-American fourth team in 1953. Shortly after graduating in 1954, Killebrew signed with the Washington Senators and made his MLB debut on June 23. He played 22 seasons and hit 573 home runs.

Illinois
Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Lincoln, East St. Louis (now East St. Louis)
CBS News picked Joyner-Kersee as the top female athlete of all-time in 2015 and Sports Illustrated did the same earlier last week. No argument here. In high school, she was an all-state basketball player and one of the top track athletes in the nation. She played both sports at UCLA and embarked on an Olympic career that saw her win three golds, a silver and two bronze medals in the long jump and heptathlon over the course of four Olympic Games.

Indiana
Oscar Robertson, Crispus Attucks (Indianapolis)
A case could be made that Robertson is the best all-around player in the history of high school, college and professional basketball. He led Crispus Attucks to a 62-1 record and two state titles and at Cincinnati he finished his career as the NCAA's all-time leading scorer. While Robertson is often mentioned as the first player to average a triple-double in a single season, what should be pointed out is that over his first five seasons in the NBA he averaged 10.4 rebounds, 10.6 assists and 30.3 points per game.

Iowa
Bob Feller, Van Meter
A Hall of Fame pitcher with the Cleveland Indians, Feller struck out 15 batters in his first professional start. He also had 17 strikeouts in a game later that season. After the season was over, Feller went back to Van Meter for his senior year. That's right, Feller posted a 5-3 record in the Major Leagues between his junior and senior year in high school. He won 266 career games, and likely would have won more if not for his four years of service in World War II during his prime.

Kansas
Jim Ryun, East (Wichita)
As a high school junior, Ryun became the first high school athlete to run a sub-4 minute mile as he clocked a 3:59 in 1964. He ran sub-4 five times while in high school and won the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete at the age of 19. He won the silver medal at the 1968 Olympics in the 1,500 meters and once held the world record in six running events.

Kentucky
Shaun Alexander, Boone County (Florence)
The top running back ever to come out of Kentucky, he rushed for 6,657 yards in high school and was a USA Today All-American. He was also All-American in college at Alabama and made the NFL's 2000s All-Decade Team while rushing for 9,453 career yards. He also played basketball, baseball and ran track in high school.

Louisiana
Peyton Manning, Newman (New Orleans)
MaxPreps has previously ranked Manning as the greatest high school football player in history, based on his accomplishments at the high school, college and professional level. He finished his career as the NFL's all-time leader in yards and touchdowns (since passed) and he still holds 20 NFL records.

Maine
Cindy Blodgett, Lawrence (Fairfield)
A three-time Gatorade State basketball Player of the Year, Blodgett went on to have a spectacular college career in which she led the nation in scoring four straight seasons. She was the fourth NCAA player to score over 3,000 career points (3,005) and she still ranks No. 13 all-time in NCAA history. She played four seasons in the WNBA.

Maryland
Michael Phelps, Towson
Winner of 23 swimming gold medals over four Summer Olympics (2004, 2008, 2012, 2016), Phelps was winning gold on an international level when he was in high school. He competed in the 2000 Olympics at 15 and set his first world record the following year at the World Championships. By the time he turned 18, Phelps had already won eight gold medals at the international level and set five world records.

Massachusetts
Patrick Ewing, Cambridge Rindge & Latin (Cambridge)
During the 1981 basketball season, Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley and Karl Malone weren't the most prized recruits in the nation. That honor went to Ewing, a three-time Parade All-American. Ewing won an NCAA championship at Georgetown, was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1985 NBA draft and enjoyed an 18-year career.

Michigan
Earvin "Magic" Johnson, Everett (Lansing)
Within a four-year period, Johnson won a high school state championship at Everett, an NCAA championship at Michigan State and an NBA championship with the Lakers. He went on to win five NBA titles and three NBA Most Valuable Player awards before entering the Hall of Fame.

Minnesota
Joe Mauer, Cretin-Derham Hall (St. Paul)
The only athlete to ever earn USA Today National Player of the Year in football and baseball. He made six All-Star games with the Minnesota Twins. In the history of Major League Baseball, a catcher has won a batting title seven times. Mauer owns three of those titles.

Mississippi
Jerry Rice, Moor
Rice might have been a bit of an unknown on the national level while in high school, but that didn't mean he wasn't an outstanding high school player. He earned all-conference honors in football and basketball before a Hall of Fame career in the NFL. He still holds 13 NFL records including No. 1 all-time in receptions, yards and touchdowns.

Missouri
Ezekiel Elliott, Burroughs (St. Louis)
Although five years into his NFL career, Elliott already ranks as one of the most accomplished athletes to come out of the Show Me State. A football and track and field star in high school, Elliott was the offensive player of the year in football by the Post Dispatch and the Gatorade State Player of the Year in Track and Field. At Ohio State, Elliott won the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. In the NFL, he is a two-time league rushing leader and a three-time Pro Bowl selection. Elliott beats out New York Yankee great Yogi Berra, who reportedly did not play high school sports.

Montana
Pat Donovan, Helena
A four-time Pro Bowl player in the NFL with the Cowboys as an offensive lineman, Donovan was all-state in football and basketball in high school and won six gold medals at the state meet in track. He is a member of the National High School Hall of Fame.

Nebraska
Bob Gibson, Omaha Tech (closed in 1984)
Gibson played American Legion baseball in high school, but he was an all-state player in basketball and track. He was a third-team All-American in basketball at Creighton before joining the St. Louis Cardinals. The Hall of Famer was a nine-time All-Star with two Cy Young Awards.

Nevada
Bryce Harper, Las Vegas
Harper only played two seasons of high school baseball, earning All-American honors as a sophomore before getting his GED in 2009 and playing collegiate baseball in 2010. He was the first overall pick in the 2010 MLB Draft and won Rookie of the Year honors in 2012. Only 28, Harper is a six-time MLB All-Star.

New Hampshire
Carlton Fisk, Charlestown
A Hall of Fame catcher with the Red Sox and White Sox, Fisk was also a standout on the hardcourt. He led Charlestown to a state championship as a sophomore and played college basketball at the University of New Hampshire.

New Jersey
Mike Trout, Millville
Trout set a state record with 18 home runs as a senior and was a first-round draft pick by the Angels in 2009. Since then, Trout has become one of the top sluggers in the league. He is an eight-time MLB All-Star and has won three MVP awards.

New Mexico
Brian Urlacher, Lovington
All-state in football and basketball, Urlacher led Lovington to a 14-0 season as a running back and defensive back. He bulked up once he reached the NFL and became one of the game's top linebackers. He went to eight Pro Bowls and was inducted into the Hall of Fame.

New York
Jim Brown, Manhasset
In the closest call of any states on the list, Brown edges Kareem Abdul-Jabbar for the top spot in New York. Both are considered, by some, to be the best player of all-time in their respective sports. Brown gets the nod here due to his prowess in basketball (he led the nation in scoring as a senior at 38 points per game) and was also one of the nation's top lacrosse players.

North Carolina
Michael Jordan, E.A. Laney (Wilmington)
On the 1981 Street and Smith high school preseason All-American team, Jordan was nowhere to be found, not even honorable mention. But that didn't mean he was a "no name" coming out of high school. North Carolina thought enough of Jordan to recruit him early in his senior year. By the time his senior season had ended, he was a Parade All-American and the MVP of the McDonald's All-American game. The rest is history — six NBA championships, five NBA MVP awards and 14 All-Star appearances.

North Dakota
Roger Maris, Shanley (Fargo)
Known as Roger Maras in high school, the future MLB home run king, earned all-state honors in football and was Shanley's leading scorer in basketball. He played 12 seasons in the Major Leagues and was twice named the league MVP.

Ohio
LeBron James, St. Vincent-St. Mary (Akron)
If he hadn't given up football following his sophomore year, James might have been the greatest two-sport athlete in high school history. A three-time Parade All-American and a two-time national player of the year in basketball, James was also all-state in football as a sophomore. He won his fourth NBA title earlier this month with the Lakers and ranks No. 3 on the league's all-time scoring list.
LeBron James played football and basketball at St. Vincent-St. Mary.
File photo by Lonnie Webb
LeBron James played football and basketball at St. Vincent-St. Mary.
Oklahoma
Mickey Mantle, Commerce
A 20-time All-Star and a three-time MVP, Mantle played semi-professional baseball and signed with the Yankees following his graduation in 1949. He was also the leading scorer on the football team and the basketball team.

Oregon
Danny Ainge, North Eugene (Eugene)
A high school All-American in football and basketball, Ainge was also drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays. After three seasons in the Minor Leagues and an All-American basketball career at BYU, Ainge played 15 seasons in the NBA.

Pennsylvania
Wilt Chamberlain, Overbrook (Philadelphia)
The Keystone State is home to a number of great NFL quarterbacks, like Johnny Unitas, Dan Marino and Joe Montana, but none of them can match the performance of Chamberlain, who was the greatest scorer the NBA has ever seen. His 50.4 scoring average in 1962 is one of the unbreakable records in the NBA. A great scorer in high school as well, Chamberlain had 90 points in one game and finished his career at Overbrook as the state's all-time leading scorer with 2,252 points.

Rhode Island
Davey Lopes, La Salle Academy (Providence)
An all-state player in basketball and baseball, Lopes played 16 seasons in the Major Leagues, mostly with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He made four All-Star games and had 557 stolen bases in his career.

South Carolina
A.J. Green, Summerville
A seven-time Pro Bowl selection in the NFL, Green ranked No. 3 nationally in career yards when he graduated from high school. He also played on a state championship basketball team and ran track at Summerville.

South Dakota
Adam Vinatieri, Rapid City Central (Rapid City)
Besides earning all-state honors as a punter in high school, Vinatieri was also a state place winner in wrestling. He played 24 seasons in the NFL and is the league's all-time leading scorer with 2,673 points. He was also named to the NFL's 100th Anniversary Team.

Tennessee
Reggie White, Howard Tech (Chattanooga)
The No. 1 recruit in the state coming out of high school, White was an All-American at Tennessee and went on to make the Pro Bowl 13 times during a 16-year NFL career. He was named to the All-Decade team for the 1980s and 1990s as well as the 100-year Anniversary Team.

Texas
Shaquille O'Neal, Cole (San Antonio)
Texas might be viewed as a football state, but its greatest athlete is O'Neal. He led Cole to a 68-1 record during his high school career and went on to a 19-year career that included 15 All-Star appearances and four NBA titles.

Utah
Merlin Olsen, Logan
A Wigwam Wiseman All-American football player, Olsen was also all-state in basketball. He developed into one of the NFL's greatest defensive linemen, earning selection to 14 Pro Bowls during a Hall of Fame career.

Vermont
Billy Kidd, Stowe
Vermont has some of the best ski resorts in the nation and one of them, Stowe, produced the state's greatest athlete. Billy Kidd was a teenage phenom, winning national downhill skiing events while a junior in high school. In 1964, Kidd became the first American downhill skier to win a medal (silver) in the Olympics.

Virginia
Allen Iverson, Bethel (Hampton)
Iverson was the state player of the year in both football and basketball as a junior and later earned All-American honors at Georgetown. He was a four-time NBA scoring champion and was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2016.

Washington
Ryne Sandberg, North Central (Spokane)
Sandberg first gained high school recognition as a Parade All-American quarterback; however, the Phillies drafted him in the 20th round of the 1979 draft and he embarked on a Major League Baseball career instead. He's generally considered one of the top 10 second basemen in MLB history and he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

West Virginia
Randy Moss, DuPont (now closed)
Moss was a two-time state player of the year in basketball and led the football team to a pair of state championships. He also won multiple state championships in track and field before moving on to a Hall of Fame career in the NFL.

Wisconsin
J.J. Watt, Pewaukee
Watt was not a highly-rated recruit coming out of high school, warranting only two stars by Scout and Rivals. However, he was an all-state tight end in football and won a state championship in the shot put. After an All-American career at Wisconsin, Watt became the second player to earn the league defensive player of the year honor three times.

Wyoming
Rulon Gardner, Star Valley (Afton)
An all-state football player, a state champion in wrestling and a state champion in the shot put in track and field, Gardner gained his greatest fame in the 2000 Sydney Olympics in Greco Roman wrestling when he defeated Russian Aleksandr Karelin for the Gold Medal. Karelin had been undefeated for 13 years and unscored upon for the previous six years.
High school girls basketball rankings: No. 1 Lake Highland Prep, other OFFICIAL Top 25 teams waiting for GEICO bids - OFFICIAL
High school girls basketball rankings: No. 1 Lake Highland Prep, other MaxPreps Top 25 teams waiting for GEICO bids
Last week, California was cleared to begin play its high school girls basketball season , but since then nothing much has happened. Facilities must be prepared, protocols must be put in place and testing must be arranged. But if all goes well, play might begin in mid-April and last for six weeks.

Yes, that would mean basketball would finish its season on Memorial Day, but that's early compared to Oregon, which right now is planning to play its last game on June 27.

And though other states are still in the TBA category (like California), 16 have completed their seasons, and 13 more will do so by next Monday.

Oh, and Hawaii and Nevada are the only two that have officially canceled their seasons.

Confused? Join the club — but crashing this year's MaxPreps Top 25 is going to get more and more difficult as teams wrap up their postseasons. For those knocking on the door, the hope is always for that dramatic postseason upset, and it's possible, if not likely, that a couple will occur.

Lately, though, the MaxPreps Top 25 has been remarkably stable, even including the fact that No. 16 has dropped out in each of the last three weeks. Coincidence? New Hope Academy, this week's No. 16, sure hopes so.

NOTE: Coaches and team personnel are encouraged to update schedules and results on MaxPreps – especially those in the mix for MaxPreps Top 25 consideration. For assistance or questions, please reach out to [email protected]
Fremont captured the Utah 5A title and could receive an invitation to the GEICO High School Nationals.
Photo by Dave Argyle
Fremont captured the Utah 5A title and could receive an invitation to the GEICO High School Nationals.
MaxPreps Top 25 Girls Basketball Rankings

Record: 19-0 | Last week: 1
It's still unclear when and where the GEICO High School Nationals will be played, but from all reports the Highlanders will be one of the four girls' participants — and thus make the GEICO a de facto national championship tournament.

2. Westlake (Atlanta)
Record:
19-0 | Last week: 2
The Lions are on track to join Lake Highland Prep at the GEICO High School Nationals, but first must take care of business in Friday's AAAAAA title game. Carrolton is 30-1, and well-coached, so it's far from a gimme.

3. Mount Notre Dame (Cincinnati)
Record:
26-0 | Last week: 3
After handling a very strong Wayne team 49-33, the Cougars draw Notre Dame Academy on Friday, a team it has beaten. But then Saturday, the likely opponent in the Division I title game is No. 12 Newark.

4. Hopkins (Minnetonka, Minn.)
Record:
12-0 | Last week: 4
Barring another COVID crisis — which canceled the much anticipated game with No. 20 Chaska last week — Hopkins will travel to unbeaten Becker on Friday before beginning postseason March 16.

5. Edison Academy (Detroit)
Record:
7-0 | Last week: 5
Arbor Prep will be the latest to challenge Pioneers' long-running domination of Michigan, but Edison will host the Thursday game.

6. Incarnate Word Academy (St. Louis)
Record:
24-0 | Last week: 6
There are two steps left in Red Knights' state title quest: First is Francis Howell Central on Wednesday, followed by the winner of 20-4 Rockbridge vs. 22-2 Holt in Saturday's championship game.

7. Cypress Creek (Houston)
Record:
32-0 | Last week: 7
The Cougars have played three games decided by fewer than 20 points all year, and none with a final margin in single digits. Thursday's 6A final at the Alamodome against No. 11 DeSoto promises to be much more competitive — and one has to wonder how CyCreek would respond in the final minutes of a close game.

8. Norman (Okla.)
Record:
16-0 | Last week: 8
The Tigers got past Putnam North, 41-39, and should the team get past Midwest City on Thursday. Either Union or Edmond North will be a serious obstacle to both a state title and an unbeaten season.

9. St. John-Vianney (Holmdel, N.J.)
Record:
14-0 | Last week: 9
The Lancers finished the season on a high note, rolling over talented Red Bank Catholic 61-34. That's it though, and we'll never know what might have happened if they'd met No. 19 Rutgers in the New Jersey postseason.

10. Paul VI (Chantilly, Va.)
Record:
10-0 | Last week: 10
We thought the Panthers' season was done, but it now appears there's a good chance PVI will play in the GEICO High School Nationals — and if so, it will be a great opportunity to stake a claim to the national title.

11. DeSoto (Texas)
Record:
26-2 | Last week: 11
The Eagles survived a grudge match with archrival Duncanville, 52-39, and then got past perennially strong South Grand Prairie 63-52. Now all that's left is unbeaten No. 7 Cypress Creek, which has not faced the same kind of tests DeSoto has this season.

12. Newark (Ohio)
Record:
27-1 | Last week: 12
After slipping past Dublin Coffman 75-73, only 19-3 Archbishop Hoben stands in the way of a dream Division 1 final against No. 3 Mount Notre Dame on Saturday.

13. Grandview (Aurora, Colo.)
Record:
14-0 | Last week: 13
Despite this ranking, the Wolves are the third seed in the Colorado 5A state playoffs, with unbeaten Valor Christian No. 1 and once-beaten Regis Jesuit (by Valor Christian) No. 2. It will all be settled on the floor come March 16.

14. Princess Anne (Virginia Beach, Va.)
Record:
10-0 | Last week: 14
Season complete.

15. Fremont (Plain City, Utah)
Record:
25-0 | Last week: 15
The Silverwolves are reported to be the Western representative to the GEICO High School Nationals after blowing open a close game in the second half of the 5A championship against Herriman. Though Fremont will be considered the underdog, don't forget that unheralded Central Valley from Washington state stunned the favorites a few years ago.

16. New Hope Academy (Landover Hills, Md.)
Record:
12-3 | Last week: 17
New Hope's truncated season will very likely end with a game against very strong Westtown this Friday. There's a remote chance an invite to the GEICO High School Nationals will be forthcoming, but only if New Hope can find a way to win against Westtown.

17. Montverde Academy (Montverde, Fla.)
Record:
21-2 | Last week: 18
Season complete.

18. Rutgers Prep (Somerset, N.J.)
Record:
13-0 | Last week: 19
Saddle River Day was supposed to give the Argonauts their toughest test, but the final was 81-54 – and Rutgers Prep's season will end on that high note.

19. American Heritage (Plantation, Fla.)
Record:
25-2 | Last week: 22
Given the strength of Florida this year, and the Patriots' tough schedule, the jump into the Top 20 seems completely justified.

20. Chaska (Minn.)
Record:
12-0 | Last week: 20
With the Hopkins game canceled, Chaska must now wait until postseason for a shot at the No. 4 team in the nation — but Minnesota is loaded this year, so there's no guarantee the two will survive to face each other.

21. Hazel Green (Ala.)
Record:
36-1 | Last week: 21
The Trojans cruised to the 6A title, cementing a spot in the Top 25.

22. Bearden (Knoxville, Tenn.)
Record:
29-1| Last week: 23
The Bulldogs begins the AAA playoffs Thursday with 20-2 Hardin County with 27-1 Bradley Central is the favorite in the other quarterfinal. And it takes wins over two teams of that caliber to get to Saturday's final.

23. Pius X (Lincoln, Neb.)
Record:
25-0 | Last week: 24
It's difficult to beat a good team twice, but the third game is exponentially more difficult. Players, rightly, believe they've already proved they're better and even coaches can fall prey to overconfidence. It wasn't easy, but the Thunderbolts avoided that trap in the Class A title game, downing Fremont for the third time this year, 56-52.

24. Crown Point (Ind.)
Record:
24-1 | Last week: 25
Season complete.

25. Zebulon B. Vance (Charlotte, N.C.)
Record: 12-0 | Last week: NR
If there was any doubt that to North Carolina's best — and given the abbreviated schedule, some doubt might have been justified — Vance terminated it with extreme prejudice by hammering an unbeaten team, 74-38, to win the 4A championship.

Dropped out:
No. 16 Ponchatoula (La.)