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Chris Livingston named 2020-21 OFFICIAL Ohio High School Basketball Player of the Year - OFFICIAL
Chris Livingston named 2020-21 MaxPreps Ohio High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Chris Livingston of Buchtel (Akron) is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Ohio High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot-6, 190-pound junior helped the Griffins go 18-5 en route to the program's third district championship in the past three seasons.

Livingston averaged 31.1 points, 15.8 rebounds, 6.1 assists, 4.7 steals and 4.0 steals per game while shooting 71 percent from the field.

In January, Livingston produced a head-turning stat line in a win over East (Akron), going for 54 points, 12 rebounds, eight assists and eight steals. 

Livingston is regarded as the No. 4 prospect in the Class of 2022 according to 247Sports. He holds offers from Akron, Florida, LSU, Ohio State, Tennessee State and UAB.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team, which is scheduled to be released April 13.
High school basketball: Sierra Canyon junior Amari Bailey scores 35 in 70-54 win over short-handed Windward - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: Sierra Canyon junior Amari Bailey scores 35 in 70-54 win over short-handed Windward
Sierra Canyon (Chatsworth) extended its league win streak to 58 games Tuesday night, defeating Windward (Los Angeles) 70-54 in a battle of short-handed California powers. Multiple scratches put a damper on the anticipated conference battle as Chance Westry and Shy Odom joined an injured Bronny James on the bench while Windward was without star duo Dylan Andrews and Kijani Wright.

UCLA commit Amari Bailey made up for the missing pieces in a big way, finishing with a game-high 35 in the lopsided victory that saw eight player suit up for Sierra Canyon (6-0).

The five-star junior helped the Trailblazers overcome a slow start, scoring the first 14 points of the contest for Sierra Canyon, including all nine first-quarter points for his side.
Amari Bailey, Sierra Canyon
Photo by Nick Koza
Amari Bailey, Sierra Canyon
After trailing by one heading to the second quarter, Sierra Canyon methodically stretched out its advantage with a 17-4 second quarter and 24-15 third quarter to lead 50-29 heading into the final frame.

Sierra Canyon returns to action on Friday night as they travel to Crossroads (Santa Monica).

Windward (7-3), which was paced by a team-high 21 points from Brandon Richard, faces Brentwood School (Los Angeles) on Friday.
Brandon Richard, Windward
Photo by Nick Koza
Brandon Richard, Windward
Sierra Canyon's Bronny James motions to his teammates on the court.
Photo by Nick Koza
Sierra Canyon's Bronny James motions to his teammates on the court.

May Manning adds own title to one of America's most famous sports families - OFFICIAL
May Manning adds own title to one of America's most famous sports families
It's been almost three weeks, but May Manning still has trouble piecing together the final, frantic yet joyous sequence of her last competitive high school volleyball match.

But she vividly recalls the feeling. And it hasn't left her.

"It happened so fast," she said. "I still get chills every time I watch that last point."

The fifth-year varsity player and third-year captain dove so hard to the Pontchartrain Center floor for a dig that she didn't hear the referee's final whistle. An opposing hitter had brushed the net. It was point, set and match, and triggered a wild, raucous celebration near midcourt.

The Academy of the Sacred Heart (New Orleans), a small all-girls Roman Catholic school founded in 1867, had won the Louisiana state Division IV girls volleyball championship in four sets Nov. 14 over favored Pope John Paul II.
May Manning played her fifth season as outside hitter and middle blocker in 2020 for the state-champion Cardinals.
Photo by Gregory Juan
May Manning played her fifth season as outside hitter and middle blocker in 2020 for the state-champion Cardinals.
May, the oldest grandchild of New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning and niece of future NFL Hall of Famers Peyton and Eli, was awarded the game's Most Valuable Player plaque, thanks to 14 kills and some tenacious defense.

"I saw everyone on the dog pile," she said. "I was late to the celebration. I said (to her team), ‘It's over? It's over?' Of course everyone was crying and yelling and cheering. I was on Cloud Nine. I don't really remember all the details from there. I was so overcome with emotion and joy. There was so much happiness."

For so many reasons.

It was the Cardinals' first state crown since 2006, and 14th overall, and came against a squad that had won three titles in four years and downed Sacred Heart earlier in the season.

"We went into the playoffs thinking, 'Hey, we're the underdogs here. Let's take advantage of that and surprise some people,' " May said.

The Sacred Heart title came a season after a 2019 dud that ended below .500 and with an early playoff exit, followed by a year that was beaten and battered by COVID-19. Practice schedules and matches were altered or skipped; fans were required to largely stay home.

"We were just lucky to play this year," May said.

Especially fortunate for May who knew she wouldn't play after 2020. Her focus by next summer will be on college, academics and new surroundings. A game she's played year-round for Cajunland Volleyball since she was 9 would be in the rear view mirror.

"It feels funny that that was my last volleyball match ever," she said. "It's bittersweet that it's over. But that's the only way you want to end a career. With a state title."

Especially with all the family who had given her so much in attendance, all decked out in bright Cardinal reds and Sacred Heart swag.

Mom and May
Leading the charge was her mom Ellen, a 1987 Sacred Heart graduate and talented 5-9 middle hitter on the volleyball team. May's mother, then Ellen Heidingsfelder, and current assistant coach Betsy Laborde (then Becker) propelled the Cardinals to the school's first state title as seniors in 1986. 

Ellen, like May, was named the championship game's MVP of that title game, a fact she didn't reveal until after last month's match.
Ellen (left) and May Manning each led their Academy of the Sacred Heart teams to state titles.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Ellen (left) and May Manning each led their Academy of the Sacred Heart teams to state titles.
"I never told her because I didn't want to put that kind of pressure on her," Ellen said. "This was her deal, but when they announced (May) won the same award it was like ‘Oh yeah, our careers do kind of parallel.' … It's not like, ‘Whoa back in my day,' but we did go to the same school and our banner is up there on the wall. We have the first and May's team will go up soon as the most recent. That will be fun."

Being a Sacred Heart athlete is in May Manning's genes as her mother and late grandmother Dot both attended along with Ellen's two sisters. Ellen was recently inducted into the Sacred Heart Sports Hall of Fame, and the strong influence of women athletes on her mom's side makes May proud.

This Manning family isn't just an old boys' network. 

"I definitely think her accomplishments get forgotten because the Mannings are so much in the spotlight," May said. "The Mannings are great athletes but I get my volleyball talents and ability from my mom. She could really pop the ball from what I've heard."

Ellen downplays her own glory days. This was May's time and Sacred Heart's return to the top.

"It was so much fun because it was so unexpected," she said. "I think they surprised themselves. ... It was a fabulous way to end her volleyball career. She ended on a high note. It was icing on the cake. I'm still smiling about it."

Dad and May
May's dad Cooper is grinning also. He is the oldest of Archie and Olivia's three boys and by many accounts, the most athletic.

A quarterback-turned-receiver, Cooper likely would've been the first Manning son to reach the NFL if a serious back ailment (spinal stenosis) hadn't ended his football career as a freshman at the University of Mississippi. It was a cruel and tough setback for Cooper, the husband and father of three who landed squarely and softly on his feet in the real estate market and as a TV host on Fox's "The Manning Hour." He's done well as Principal and Senior Managing Director of Investor Relations for AJ Capital Partners. 

But he struck gold meeting Ellen, a licensed attorney, and the couple have been married 21 years. They also have raised two athletic boys, Arch Manning and Heid Manning, both members of the Newman (New Orleans) football squad. The Greenies (8-0), the top seed in the Division III playoffs, host Catholic (New Iberia) at 7 p.m. today in a quarterfinal game.

Arch is the nation's top-rated sophomore quarterback and Heid, a promising freshman offensive lineman.

"When Coop and I decided to have kids it was decided he'd be the breadwinner and I run the household," Ellen said. "It has worked out perfectly so we stuck with it."
May Manning with her father Cooper Manning.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
May Manning with her father Cooper Manning.
Cooper didn't just spend time running the boys to ball fields. May played as many sports as the boys, maybe more, including swimming, gymnastics, soccer and tennis. Cooper, in fact, did most of the traveling with May to out-of-area volleyball tournaments. 

"We've had a lot of late Sunday night drives home and a lot of late airport layovers together," he said. "It's been a lot of fun; everything about it. It's been a terrific bonding experience with my daughter. She's always been a delight to be there for.

"Selfishly, it was neat to see it all come together for her last game of her career. A lot of girls playing and all their parents have been through the same journey. It was really sweet. May and all those girls put in a lot of work. It's been a rough year for a lot of seniors across the country in sports. I'm thrilled they got something to hang onto that was so positive."

He admitted getting pretty choked up when May got the MVP award.

"It was well deserved," Cooper said. "They had a lot of different girls all season that could have been MVP. But May never comes off the court. I would say she was their vocal leader."

The boys
There was plenty of hollering during May's championship match from her younger brothers, along with a group of other Newman football players behind the Pope John Paul II bench.

The Manning siblings are tight and all within four years in age. The boys would have made more volleyball matches this season, but COVID restrictions kept them away. Nothing restricted them on championship day. May noticed all the Greenies, dressed in Sacred Heart colors, and even volleyball practice jerseys.
The Manning family left-to-right: Arch, Heid, Ellen, May and Cooper.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
The Manning family left-to-right: Arch, Heid, Ellen, May and Cooper.
"They must have raided my closet," she said. "They took all the Sacred Heart gear they could find. It was great."

Roughly 300 fans were allowed into the title match and the football kids were perhaps the loudest. Their enthusiasm and excitement has barely simmered. 

"The boys were super proud of their sister," Ellen said. "Arch told me the following week, ‘Mom, I've been smiling all weekend about it.' People, he said, were congratulating him. It's just been a neat experience for all of us."

Sibling competition can sometime get complicated, especially in a spotlighted home like the Mannings.

Arch, for instance, was the 2019 MaxPreps national Freshman of the Year and recently he played and was featured on ESPNU. He's considered one of the most coveted recruits from any class and recognizable prep athletes in the country.

Cooper, with a unique perspective, said sibling rivalries don't exist in the household and he's rarely had to address it, if at all.

"They all support and love each other," he said. "Everyone is equally excited for others' successes. If I ever have to talk about it, I would simply say: ‘Look at me. I'm a guy who has two brothers that won Super Bowls and been on the highest level and I've been nothing but thrilled for them. Jealousy is a nasty thing, so let's never go there.' "

May jokes about Arch's sudden arc to stardom in the last year.

"It's obviously weird when you see your little brother on national TV and 20 minutes later he's complaining about something or eating a bowl of Frosted Flakes at the kitchen table," she said. "It's like, ‘Wait, is this the same person?'

"As we've gotten older we've got closer. All our friends hang out together. But he'll always be my little brother. It will definitely be weird seeing him on TV in interviews or getting fan mail later. I don't think any of it right now affects him. He's oblivious to it sometimes. He doesn't realize that it's kind of a big deal. … Arch is probably one of the most humble people I've ever known."

Family matters
May's grandparents Archie and Olivia (Cooper's parents) and Charles Heidingsfelder (Ellen's father) also attended her championship match. They've been there every step of the way, May said. 

"They (Archie and Olivia) raised just boys playing football, basketball and baseball, so they'd never been to a swim meet, gymnastics events or girls basketball and soccer games, yet they were there for me," May said. "He (Heidingsfelder) told me after the match that between his daughters and other grandchildren he'd been going to matches for 40 years and that our match was his last. It was a great finish for him, too."
Front row (L-R): Heid Manning, Ellen Manning. Backrow (L-R): Charles Heidingsfelder, Jane Heidingsfelder, Archie Manning, May Manning, Olivia Manning, Arch Manning and Cooper Manning.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Front row (L-R): Heid Manning, Ellen Manning. Backrow (L-R): Charles Heidingsfelder, Jane Heidingsfelder, Archie Manning, May Manning, Olivia Manning, Arch Manning and Cooper Manning.

Dot joined Charles at many of May's games before a long bout with Parkinson's disease and dementia was finally cut short in March by COVID-19. Dot was 77. 

"She went to all the games even when she wasn't her best," Ellen said. "I wear a little bracelet that says 'Mom' on it. (Before last month's title match) I said 'OK mom, let's go root on May.' She would have been thrilled."

That kind of support from family and friends has helped May thrive, she said, and live easy in The Big Easy — even as a Manning.

"I think my friends and Arch's friends make it all so normal, so comfortable," May said. "It's not as big a deal as it might seem. Obviously my grandfather played for the Saints, my uncles played in the NFL. Everyone in New Orleans knows the Mannings and is so used to it."

Going to Sacred Heart has also helped with the spotlight or possible scrutiny, she said.

"To be honest, I've never felt pressure to succeed or play sports or anything," she said. "Not from my family, my friends or people in New Orleans. I really think going to an all-girls school helped with that.

"I'm sorta trying to start my own legacy. It is more May vs. May Manning which has been a blessing. If I do feel pressure, it's me putting pressure on myself, not anyone else. I'm lucky for that."

Ultimately, her healthy perspective comes back to a balanced, enthusiastic family who shows its true color, whether at championship matches or practice or school.

"I think it's everybody — my parents, my grandparents, my brothers," she said. "It's just having such a huge support system that's so separate from football.

"From the beginning my parents made it clear: ‘You like sports, play sports. If you don't like sports, you don't have to do it.' I do it for me because I love to compete and I love my teams."

For the first time, she's attempting four sports this school year, including basketball currently, and golf and tennis in the spring. She's been on the tennis team since the sixth grade.

She said the best way to cap her senior season would be if her brothers dive in and grab Newman's first football state title. 

"Arch told me how cool it was to watch us win the state title and I told him 'I hope y'all win one too,' " May said. "It's the best feeling ever."
May Manning helped lead Academy of the Sacred Heart to its 14th state title but first since 2006 last month.
Photo by Gregory Juan
May Manning helped lead Academy of the Sacred Heart to its 14th state title but first since 2006 last month.
Ellen Manning (Heidingsfelder) sits in the middle front row right behind the 1986 Academy of the Sacred Heart state title trophy. To her left is Betsy Laborde (Becker) who was an assistant coach for the Cardinals in 2020.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Ellen Manning (Heidingsfelder) sits in the middle front row right behind the 1986 Academy of the Sacred Heart state title trophy. To her left is Betsy Laborde (Becker) who was an assistant coach for the Cardinals in 2020.
Newman football players pose with state champion May Manning.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Newman football players pose with state champion May Manning.

Top female high school athlete in each state - OFFICIAL
Top female high school athlete in each state
Video: Te-Hina Paopao highlights
See the Oregon commit in action for La Jolla Country Day.

Paige Bueckers of Hopkins (Minnetonka, Minn.) was named the MaxPreps Female Athlete of the Year, but who are the top athletes in the other states?

From Maine to Hawaii and Alaska to Florida, the nation is chock full of amazing talents. All-state honorees, players of the year and record-setters dot the list as MaxPreps chooses the top athlete in every state in the country, along with the District of Columbia.
Graphic by Ryan Escobar
Alabama
Grace Carr, Mountain Brook (Birmingham)
The Class 7A state Player of the Year by the Alabama Sports Writers Association, Carr led her team to a state championship and finished with 713 kills and 583 digs on the season.

Alaska
Destiny Reimers, Anchorage Christian (Anchorage)
Reimers earned all-state honors three times in her career and led Anchorage Christian to a 23-1 record and a state championship.

Arizona
Alyssa Brown, Sahuaro (Tucson)
One of the leading scorers in the country, Brown averaged 31.4 points in leading Sahuaro to the state championship game and a 28-2 record.

Arkansas
Jersey Wolfenbarger, Northside (Fort Smith)
The MaxPreps state basketball Player of the Year is one of the top recruits in the Class of 2021. She led Northside to a 25-3 record while averaging 18.7 points per game.

California
Te-Hina Paopao, La Jolla Country Day (La Jolla)
A MaxPreps first team All-American, Paopao averaged 22.3 points and 7.8 rebounds in helping La Jolla Country Day to a No. 1 ranking in the nation.

Colorado
Julianna Dalton, Chaparral (Parker)
Dalton earned All-American honors by Under Armour after leading Chaparral to a Class 5A state championship. She had 313 kills and 289 digs and was the state's 5A state player of the year.

Connecticut
Sydney Masciarelli, Marianapolis Prep (Thompson)
The top distance runner in the state finished seventh at the Foot Locker championships and was second in the Foot Locker northeast regional.

Delaware
Allie Kubek, Sanford (Hockessin)
Kubek has been all-state three times and helped lead Sanford to an 18-2 record this year while averaging 20.2 points per game.

Washington, D.C.
Kiki Rice, Sidwell Friends
A Gatorade state Player of the Year in soccer and basketball, Rice averaged 26.8 points in leading her team to a 25-6 record this year.

Florida
O'Mariah Gordon, Braden River (Bradenton)
A two-time Gatorade State Player of the Year, Gordon was a fourth-team MaxPreps All-American while averaging 23.1 points per game.

Georgia
Savannah Bray, Etowah (Woodstock)
Named the Class 7A state Player of the Year, Bray led her team to the state semifinals. She posted 734 kills and 705 dogs and had a state record 2,304 kills, according to the Tribune Ledger.

Hawaii
Elena Oglivie, 'Iolani (Honolulu)
A three-time Gatorade State Player of the Year in volleyball, Oglivie played for Team USA during the World Championships and also had 259 kills for ‘Iolani during the fall season.

Idaho
Peyton McFarland, Boise
At 6-foot-4, McFarland ranks as one of the top post players in the Class of 2020. She averaged 16.2 points and 9.1 rebounds while leading her team to a 17-9 record.

Illinois
Katelynne Hart, Glenbard West (Glen Ellyn)
The state Class 3A champion in cross country for the fourth time, Hart finished fourth at the Foot Locker National Championships.

Indiana
Madison Layden, Northwestern (Kokomo)
Layden finished her career as one of the state's all-time leading scorers with 2,360 points. She earned all-state honors three times and averaged 25.6 points this year.

Iowa
Caitlin Clark, Dowling Catholic (West Des Moines)
Clark twice earned Gatorade Player of the Year honors, including her senior year when she averaged 33.4 points. She scored 2,547 points in her four-year varsity career.

Kansas
Kendra Wait, Gardner-Edgerton (Gardner)
Wait posted 2,669 assists and 1,078 digs in her high school volleyball career, according to Gatorade. She was also the Kansas Gatorade State Player of the Year in track and field as a junior.

Kentucky
Anna DeBeer, Assumption (Louisville)
DeBeer helped lead Assumption to a state championship and earned MaxPreps first team All-America honors. She had 409 kills and 287 digs on the season.

Louisiana
Jerkaila Jordan, John Curtis Christian (River Ridge)
Jordan led the Patriots to a 27-4 record and a fourth straight Division I championship. She was also a four-time state championship game MVP. She finished the season averaging 21.7 points per game.

Maine
Emily Archibald, Kennebunk
A soccer and basketball standout, Archibald averaged 20 points and 13.5 rebounds for the basketball team and was named league player of the year for the second time.

Maryland
Mary Grace Goyena, Mount de Sales Academy (Catonsville)
Mount de Sales won the IAAM volleyball championship on the play of Goyena, who had 410 kills on the season.

Massachusetts
Francesca Frelick, Austin Prep (Reading)
The returning Division III Player of the Year in softball, Frelick was also a four-time CCL all-star in ice hockey.

Michigan
Jess Mruzik, Mercy (Farmington Hills)
A MaxPreps All-American, Mruzik led Mercy to a 59-1 record and a state championship. She had 495 kills and 209 digs on the season.
Jess Mruzik, Mercy
File photo by Kent Koller
Jess Mruzik, Mercy
Minnesota
Paige Bueckers, Hopkins (Minnetonka)
The MaxPreps National Athlete of the Year will play at UConn next year after averaging 21.4 points and 9.4 assists per game at Hopkins.

Mississippi
Jaccoria Bracey, Ruleville Central (Ruleville)
Averaging 35 points per game, Bracey was the MaxPreps state Player of the Year in 2020. She finished her career as one of the state's all-time leading scorers with 4,334 points.

Missouri
Birdie Hendrickson, Logan-Rogersville (Rogersville)
A two-time Gatorade State Player of the Year, Hendrickson led her team to the state finals and had 483 kills and 382 digs on the season.

Montana
Kyndall Keller , Havre
Keller earned all-state honors three years in a row and led her team to a 20-2 record in 2020. She averaged 18.7 points during the season.

Nebraska
Lindsay Krause, Skutt Catholic (Omaha)
A MaxPreps second team All-American, Krause led her team to a Class B state championship and had 360 kills and 143 digs on the year.

Nevada
Audrey Boch Collins, Clark (Las Vegas)
Boch Collins became the first girls tennis player to win the single state championship four years in a row. She is one of the top-ranked high school players in the country.

New Hampshire
Shauna Vadeboncoeur, Exeter
Just a sophomore, Vadeboncoeur was the Division I girls hockey Player of the Year after registering 42 goals with 17 assists.

New Jersey
Anna Morris, Immaculate Heart Academy (Washington Township)
A basketball and volleyball standout, Morris led her team to a Non-Public Tournament of Champions title in volleyball and had 413 kills for the season. She's headed to Northwestern on a basketball scholarship.

New Mexico
Viane Cumber, Sandia (Albuquerque)
Cumber, a junior, led her team to a 21-5 record and averaged 22.4 points and 10.6 rebounds.

New York
Katelyn Tuohy, North Rockland (Thiells)
The top distance runner in the country for three years in a row, Tuohy is a four-time Gatorade Player of the Year winner. She won the Nike Cross Nationals for the third straight year.

North Carolina
Saniya Rivers, Ashley (Wilmington)
Already a two-time Gatorade state Player of the Year, Rivers returns for her senior season next year as one of the top all-around players in the Class of 2021. She averaged 250 points and 11.8 rebounds at Ashley.

North Dakota
Abigail Duchscherer, Kindred
Only a sophomore, Duchscherer is already one of the top basketball players in the state as she has been named all-state three times and is closing in on 2,000 career points.

Ohio
Madeline Westbeld, Fairmont (Kettering)
A McDonald's All-Star Game participant, Westbeld helped her team to the regional finals and a 25-3 record. She averaged 18 points and 11.2 rebounds on the season.

Oklahoma
Aaliyah Moore, Moore
A MaxPreps All-American, Moore is one of the top players in the Class of 2021. She averaged 21.9 points and 10.9 rebounds this season.

Oregon
Fiona Max, Summit (Bend)
Finishing 10th at the Nike Cross Nationals, Max earned All-American honors. She is a two-time Gatorade State Player of the Year honoree and she led Summit to the Class 6A state championship this year.

Pennsylvania
Marlee Starliper, Northern York (Dillsburg)
One of the top cross country and track and field long distance runners in the nation, Starliper finished fifth at the Nike Cross Country Nationals and second at the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships.

Rhode Island
Keri Spitler, North Kingstown
Spitler led her team to a second straight state volleyball championship and a 19-0 record. She had 283 kills and 129 digs on the year.

South Carolina
Loyal McQueen, Wilson (Florence)
McQueen was one of the top scorers in the state with 27.3 points per game and over 2,000 in her career. She is a three-time all-state pick by the state coaches association and played five years on the varsity.

South Dakota
Kadye Fernholz, Miller
A second team All-American by the American Volleyball Coaches Association, Fernholz had 575 kills and 437 digs in leading Miller to a 34-3 record.

Tennessee
Alex Walsh, Harpeth Hall (Nashville)
The nation's No. 2 swimming recruit, Walsh set a national high school record in the 100 backstroke this year.

Texas
Paige Flickinger, Byron Nelson (Trophy Club)
The MaxPreps Volleyball Player of the Year, Flickinger led her team to a Class 6A state championship and had 797 kills and 813 digs on the season.

Utah
Kennady McQueen, North Summit (Coalville)
A two-sport star, McQueen averaged 20.7 points per game in basketball for a team that went 24-2. In volleyball, she had 215 kills and 222 digs.

Vermont
Kristyna Kaltounkova, Vermont Academy (Saxtons River)
A native of Czechoslovakia, Kaltounkova has been one of the top hockey players in New England for the past four seasons, recently committing to play at Colgate.

Virginia
Sydney Reed, Flint Hill (Oakton)
The VISAA Division I player of the year, Reed led Flint to a 31-1 record and a state title. She had 253 digs and 243 kills on the season.

Washington
Hailey Van Lith, Cashmere
Van Lith was rated as one of the top guards in the country this year and was the Seattle Times State Player of the Year. She ended her career as the state's all-time leading scorer with 2,994 points.

West Virginia
Skye Stokes, Oak Glen (New Cumberland)
Stokes led Oak Glen to a 38-0 record, a Class AA state championship and was named the state Player of the Year. She had 392 kills, 158 aces and 235 digs.

Wisconsin
Lexi Donarski, Aquinas (La Crosse)
A McDonald's All-Star Game selection, Donarski averaged 24 points per game and led her team to a 22-1 record. She is a three-time all-state pick.

Wyoming
Danilynn Schell, Kelly Walsh (Casper)
Schell is a four-time all-state pick and she led Kelly Walsh to a Class 4A state title and a 35-1 record. She also had 528 assists on the season. She was also one of the top players on the basketball team that won the Class 4A state championship.
Kennady McQueen, North Summit
File photo by Dave Argyle
Kennady McQueen, North Summit
Over 29,000 fans attended high school baseball state tournament in Iowa last week - OFFICIAL
Over 29,000 fans attended high school baseball state tournament in Iowa last week
While Major League Baseball is suffering through cancellations and postponements in trying to get its season off the ground amid the pandemic, the Iowa high school baseball tournament went off without a hitch last week. Over 29,000 fans attended the event at Principal Park in Des Moines – home of the Triple-A Iowa Cubs.

The event was played throughout last week with state championships in all four classes held Saturday. According to a Twitter account devoted to the Iowa high school baseball tournament, 29,904 fans passed through the turnstiles – the highest turnout since 2014.
Due to virus concerns, ticket sales for each game were capped around 1,800, according to a press release distributed by the IHSAA. Capacity at Principal Park is 11,500.

While reports from last week's championships have been positive, the state's summer baseball and softball seasons haven't been without adversity when it comes to the novel coronavirus. ESPN reported in early July that at least 25 of 338 baseball teams and 20 softball teams have encountered some type of exposure to COVID-19.

Class 4A baseball championship contender Dowling Catholic (West Des Moines) ended its season around the same time after a member of the team tested positive for COVID-19. The school's softball team also ended its season prematurely.

The season got underway a month later than originally scheduled. Those initial baseball and softball contests in Iowa were the first high school sports events since the pandemic shut things down in March.