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NFL Draft: 10 players who could've been first-round picks out of high school - OFFICIAL
NFL Draft: 10 players who could've been first-round picks out of high school
The NFL Draft is set for tonight in Cleveland, Ohio, with 32 NFL teams prepared to choose from among the nation's best college players. But what if they were able to choose high school players?

Baseball, hockey and basketball professional leagues have all drafted players right out of high school while the NFL requires a player to be three years removed from his graduating class. Opponents of drafting players out of high school into the NFL site maturity level, physical strength and quickness and knowledge of the game as reasons why prep players just aren't ready.

However, there are always those precocious players mature beyond their years who possess the size, strength and speed to compete at the professional level. The emergence of Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence as a "once-in-a-generation talent" leads those to wonder if Lawrence might have been a first-round pick right out of high school.

MaxPreps takes a look at 10 players, including Lawrence, who were "once-in-a-generation talents" in their own day. Not all of them succeeded in the NFL while others have gone on to be Hall of Famers. The argument here is that all 10 were phenoms coming out of high school and highly likely that some NFL general manager would have been willing to take a first-round gamble on their potential.
Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe
File photo by Ron McCann
Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe
10 NFL-ready players out of high school

Trevor Lawrence, Cartersville (Ga.), 2017
Resume:
The presumptive first pick in this year's draft has been the nation's most coveted quarterback since his freshman year at Cartersville. The No. 1 ranked quarterback in his class throughout his high school career, he's been labeled by some scouts as the greatest quarterback prospect of all-time, along with Hall of Famer John Elway. He became a starter early in his freshman season at Clemson and led the Tigers to a national championship.
Why he would be drafted: At 6-foot-6 and and 208 pounds, Lawrence definitely had the size that NFL scouts like to see in a quarterback. However, he also has arm strength, quickness, maneuverability in the pocket, and passing instincts that make him a once in a generation playcaller.

Herschel Walker, Johnson County (Wrightsville, Ga.), 1979
Resume:
He was the biggest thing to ever happen in Wrightsville (Ga.) in 1979. Colleges from all over the country came to the small town of 2,000 people to watch Walker practice. He rushed for 3,167 yards and 45 touchdowns as a senior, a rushing record that lasted for 21 years. He was a Heisman Trophy candidate as a true freshman after rushing for 1,616 yards. He left Georgia after his junior year to play football in the USFL and eventually played 12 seasons in the NFL.
Why would he be drafted: Very few running backs coming out of high school have ever had the total package that Walker presented. At 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, he was big for a halfback. However, he was also the fastest player on the field — he won the 100 and 200-yard dashes at the state meet — and one of the strongest, he was a state shot put champion as well.

Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe (Rock Hill, S.C.), 2011
Resume:
The No. 1 overall pick in the 2014 NFL draft, Clowney had strong credentials as a edge rusher coming out of high school. He had 69.5 sacks in his three years on the varsity, including 29.5 as a senior when he was regarded as the nation's No. 1 overall recruit regardless of position. He was a two-time All-American in college at South Carolina, starting as a freshman and essentially recognized as college football's best defensive player by his sophomore season. He's a three-time Pro Bowler in the NFL.
Why would he be drafted: Clowney was not only viewed as the top player in the class of 2014, but that he would have been the top player in many other classes as well. At 6-5, 250 pounds, he'd already developed into a player capable of playing at a much higher level.

Adrian Peterson, Palestine (Texas), 2003
Resume:
One of the more recent players who could have made the jump, Peterson was the national player of the year while running for 2,950 yards as a senior in 2003. The following year as a true freshman, Peterson finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting after rushing for 1,925 yards. He has since gone on to become the fifth all-time leading rusher in NFL history.
Why would he be drafted: Peterson has given several interviews to ESPN, noting that he felt he was capable of making the jump from high school to the pros. According to an article by Len Pasquarelli in 2007, Peterson is often named by talent evaluators as the player who most capable of making the jump.

Marcus Dupree, Philadelphia (Miss.), 1981
Resume:
The most prized high school prospect in the nation in 1981, Dupree scored on his very first possession as a freshman and finished his career with 87 touchdowns. When he arrived on campus at Oklahoma, head coach Barry Switzer reportedly said, "He was the best player on the field ... physically ready, as a true freshman, to be the best player on a great college team. Maybe even ready for the NFL at that age." Dupree came through as a freshman, rushing for 1,144 yards and earning second team All-America honors. However, he left Oklahoma after his freshman year and ended up playing the USFL at the age of 19. After a brief stint with the Los Angeles Rams, Dupree was out of the NFL due to injuries.
Why would he be drafted: Dupree was 210 pounds as a freshman in high school, eventually growing to 235 pounds. He also had sprinter speed, reportedly posting a 4.29 40-yard dash.

Andy Katzenmoyer, Westerville South (Westerville, Ohio), 1995
Resume:
A 6-foot-5, 240-pound linebacker in high school, Katzenmoyer devastated opponents with his speed and instincts. He was named the best player, not just linebacker, in the Detroit Free Press's Best in the Midwest rankings. USA Today named him National Defensive Player of the Year. He was Mr. Football in Ohio. He was also the top linebacker on the Parade Magazine All-America team. As a true freshman at Ohio State, he beat out a Butkus Award finalist from the year before, Greg Bellisari, at middle linebacker and set school records for sacks and tackles for loss while earning All-Big Ten honors. Ohio State had the nation's top passing defense with Katzenmoyer leading the way.
Why would he be drafted: Speed, instinct and tackling ability were Katzenmoyer's trademarks (his coach at Westerville South held him out of tackling drills to prevent other players from getting hurt, according to the Detroit Free Press). A neck injury as a rookie brought a premature end to his career.

Cookie Gilchrist, Har-Brack (Natrona Heights, Pa.), 1953
Resume:
Gilchrist was the top player in Pennsylvania in 1953. Just a junior, Gilchrist was one of the leading scorers in the state with 184 points on 24 touchdowns and 42 extra points. He earned all-state honors, receiving the most votes on the team. The problem for Gilchrist, however, is that he was ineligible to play as a senior. WPIAL rules prevented any senior who turned 19 prior to Sept. 1 from playing. Gilchrist turned 19 in May of his junior year. Fortune found Gilchrist in the form of Cleveland Browns coach Paul Brown, who signed Gilchrist to a contract. However a disagreement led to Gilchrist leaving the Browns. He did play in the Ontario Rugby Union (a precursor to the Canadian Football League) as a 19-year-old. He later played in the AFL and was the AFL MVP in 1962.
Why would he be drafted: Obviously talented enough to gain the attention of Paul Brown, who had coached the Browns to an 11-1 record and a runner-up finish to Detroit in the NFL championship game.

Orlando Pace, Sandusky (Ohio), 1993
Resume:
Pace was bigger than most professional offensive linemen when he was still in high school. At 6-foot-8, 320 pounds, Pace was the state lineman of the year as a senior while also earning All-America honors. He became one of just two Buckeyes to ever start as a true freshmen. He is the only two-time winner of the Lombardi Award, winning it as a 20-year old sophomore. He's in the NFL and College Halls of Fame.
Why would he be drafted: Size alone would have made Pace a tempting pick. He's one of the largest players ever selected to the Hall of Fame. However, he was also characterized as being very athletic for a player his size. It was those attributes that made him the No. 1 overall pick in the 1997 NFL Draft.

Bill Fralic, Penn Hills (Pittsburgh, Pa.), 1980
Resume:
A four-year starter at Penn Hills, Fralic helped his team win three WPIAL championships. As a senior, he earned the Dial National Athlete of the Year Award, which had been given the previous year to Herschel Walker. A two-way lineman, Fralic had 15 sacks as a senior, but he found his way into the starting lineup at Pittsburgh as a college freshman. He eventually earned consensus All-America honors twice and was twice a top 10 finisher in the Heisman Trophy voting. He was a four-time Pro Bowl player in the NFL with the Falcons.
Why would he be drafted: Fralic's versatility would have been a huge bonus as he was able to play on both the offensive and defensive lines as well as tight end. He dominated high school opponents with his quickness and strength.

Bronko Nagurski, Bemidji (Minn.), 1926
Resume:
More legendary stories have been told about Nagurski than probably any NFL player in history. Noted for his incredible strength, speed and agility, Nagurski was a powerful runner on offense, but also strong enough to play offensive tackle. He ran the 100-yard dash in 10.2 seconds and reportedly had a 19.5 inch ring size — the largest of any NFL Hall of Fame member. He reportedly could have played any position on the field during the 1930s, including quarterback. He threw several touchdown passes in leading the Bears to two world championships.
Why would he be drafted: At 6-2, 220 pounds, Nagurski was bigger than over half of the linemen on the Chicago Bears when he joined them. His natural strength made him such a valuable player at the University of Minnesota and later with the Bears.
High school softball: Coaches with 1,000 or more wins - OFFICIAL
High school softball: Coaches with 1,000 or more wins
The math is simple, yet staggering. Multiply 40 x 50 and you get 2,000. That's 40 wins a year times 50 years equals 2,000 wins. A high school school coach could accomplish that unimaginable feat and yet still come up 89 wins short of passing Jefferson (Cedar Rapids, Iowa) coaching legend Larry Niemeyer.

Niemeyer heads a list of high school softball coaches with 1,000 or more wins and his total is one of the more amazing feats in high school sports. With 2,089 career wins over 56 seasons, Niemeyer averaged 37 wins a year. By comparison, only about 30 high schools in the nation won 37 or more games during the 2019 season (the last full high school softball season). He also finished nearly 250 wins ahead of No. 2 Frank Huston, who retired in 2019 with 1,853.

In real estate, there's the old adage, "location, location, location." The same is true for high school softball coaches, and those three locations are Iowa, Michigan and Alabama. Of the 34 coaches on the list with over 1,000 wins, only four came from states other than those three. Iowa has 17 coaches on the list, including the top eight while Michigan has nine. Alabama has three while California, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Illinois have one each.

Sources for the list include the National Federation of High Schools record book, the Iowa Softball Coaches Association record book, state association record books and the Cal-Hi Sports Record Book by Mark and Nelson Tennis. Additions or corrections? [email protected]
Carlmont coach Jim Liggett has 1,009 wins.
File photo by Doug Stringer
Carlmont coach Jim Liggett has 1,009 wins.
High school softball coaches with 1,000-plus wins

1. Larry Niemeyer
Wins:
2,089
Schools: Jefferson (Cedar Rapids, Iowa)
Years: 1958-2013
Total Record: 2,089-429

2. Frank Huston
Wins:
1,853
Schools: Ottumwa (Iowa), Pekin (Packwood, Iowa), Gladbrook-Reinbeck (Iowa)
Years: 1967-2019
Total Record:1,853-508

3. Ed Coughenour
Wins:
1,444
Schools: Kingsley-Pierson (Kingsley, Iowa)
Years: 1956-2006
Total Record: 1,444-375

4. Gary Page
Wins:
1,400
Schools: Urbandale (Iowa)
Years: 1966-2000
Total Record: 1,400-462

5. Bill Hennessy
Wins:
1,374
Schools: Roland-Story (Story City, Iowa)
Years: 1955-2000
Total Record: 1,374-571

6. Steve Schlafke
Wins:
1,261
Schools: Garnavillo, Audubon (Iowa), A-D-M (Adel, Iowa), Dallas Center-Grimes (Iowa)
Years: 1976-present
Total Record: 1,261-628

7. Dennis Johnson
Wins:
1,249
Schools: North Scott (Eldridge, Iowa)
Years: 1975-2001, 2006-14
Total Record: 1,249-298-1

8. Bob Bunting
Wins:
1,217
Schools: Lisbon (Iowa)
Years: 1969-present
Total Record: 1,217-637

9. Diane Laffey
Wins:
1,212
Schools: Regina (Warren, Mich.)
Years: 1963-present
Total Record: 1,212-485-5

10. Brad Walraven
Wins:
1,195
Schools: All Saints Central (Bay City, Mich.), Frankenmuth (Mich.)
Years: 1980-present
Total Record: 1,195-356-3

11. Jim Brown
Wins:
1,186
Schools: Hoover (Ala.)
Years: 1991-2013
Total Record: 1,186-319-1

12. Tom Kennelly
Wins:
1,184
Schools: Swan Valley (Saginaw, Mich.)
Years: 1980-present
Total Record: 1,184-302-1

13. Steve Saladino
Wins:
1,179
Schools: Davenport West (Davenport, Iowa)
Years: 1979-present
Total Record: 1,179 wins

14. Rick Dillinger
Wins:
1,174
Schools: A-D-M (Adel, Iowa), North Polk (Alleman, Iowa), Danville (Iowa)
Years: 1976-2018
Total Record: 1,174-555

15. Denny Dock
Wins:
1,170
Schools: Dowagiac (Mich.), Lakeshore (Stevensville, Mich.)
Years: 1976-81, 1985-88, 1990-present
Total Record: 1,170-316-2

16. Dick Rasmussen
Wins:
1,165
Schools: Ankeny (Iowa), South Hamilton (Jewell, Iowa)
Years: 1965-1996
Total Record: 1,165-314

17. Jim Flaws
Wins:
1,142
Schools: Carlisle (Iowa), Dow City-Arion,
Years: 1983-present
Total Record: 1,142-227

18. Joe Gilbert
Wins:
1,140
Schools: Barnsdall (Okla.)
Years: 1954-2020
Total Record: 1,140 wins

19. Joe Alsup
Wins:
1,140
Schools: Waterford Township (Mich.); Mott (Waterford, Mich.); Kettering (Waterford, Mich.), Lakeland (White Lake, Mich.)
Years: 1975-94, 1998-2019
Total Record: 1,140-274

20. Mike Vint
Wins:
1,108
Schools: Marshalltown (Iowa), East Marshall (Le Grand, Iowa), Green Mountain
Years: 1971-2010
Total Record: 1,108-403

21. Ted McIntyre
Wins:
1,081
Schools: Mt. Pleasant (Mich.)
Years: 1975-2019
Total Record: 1,081-414

22. Larry Heath
Wins:
1,078
Schools: Burlington (Iowa)
Years: 1985-present
Total Record: 1,078-431

23. Tony Scarbrough
Wins:
1,071
Schools: Baker (Mobile, Ala.)
Years: 1970-present
Total Record: 1,071 wins

24. Jerry Newton
Wins:
1,068
Schools: Charles City (Iowa)
Years: 1967-1999
Total Record: 1,068-190

25. Dennis Schuur
Wins:
1,052
Schools: Muscatine (Iowa), Lake City (Iowa)
Years: 1989-2015
Total Record: 1,052-251

26. Ton Vruggink
Wins:
1,052
Schools: Hudsonville (Mich.)
Years: 1982-present
Total Record: 1,052-274

27. John Biedenbach
Wins:
1,050
Schools: Trenton (Mich.)
Years: 1975-present
Total Record: 1,050-500-6

28. Randy Wolken
Wins:
1,044
Schools: St. Joseph-Ogden (St. Joseph, Ill.)
Years: 1980-2018
Total Record: 1,044-242

29. Gary Adams
Wins:
1,043
Schools: Crescent (Iva, S.C.)
Years: 1977-2019
Total Record: 1,043-169

30. Howard Stuart
Wins:
1,043
Schools: Richmond (Mich.)
Years: 1979-present
Total Record: 1,043-308-1

31. Bob Bradfield
Wins:
1,041
Schools: Fairfield (Iowa)
Years: 1979-present
Total Record: 1,041-652

32. Mike Crossley
Wins:
1,039
School: Newcastle (Okla.)
Years: 1988-present
Total Record: 1,039-310

33. Howard Dorman
Wins:
1,019
Schools: Belmond-Klemme (Belmond, Iowa), Woden-Crystal Lake-Titonka (Crystal Lake, Iowa)
Years: 1960-2008
Total Record: 1,019-429

34. Dale Palmer,
Wins:
1,016
Schools: Sparkman (Harvest, Ala.)
Years: 1997-present
Total Record: 1,016 wins

35. Jim Liggett
Wins:
1,009
Schools: Carlmont (Belmont, Calif.)
Years: 1976-2016
Total Record: 1,009-216
Start dates for high school baseball/softball in all 50 states - OFFICIAL
Start dates for high school baseball/softball in all 50 states
High school baseball and softball seasons have always had staggered start dates among the 50 states, but COVID-19 has made the differences even more pronounced.

States that have an early February start date, such as Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Texas, are business as usual and have already begun play. However, some states that normally get started in late March have postponed start dates until mid- to late-April. Maryland may have the most delayed start date as it won't start until April 29.

At least five states have yet to determine a start or finish date, including Hawaii and four other Northeastern states.

Following are the start and state tournament dates for baseball and softball in each state as released by the state associations.
IMG Academy and Marcus (Texas) battle over the weekend.
Photo by Tommy Hays
IMG Academy and Marcus (Texas) battle over the weekend.
Alabama
Baseball — Underway/May 17-22
Softball — Underway/May 18-22

Alaska
Baseball — March 30/June 3-5
Softball — March 30/June 3-5

Arizona
Baseball — March 12/TBA
Softball — March 12/TBA

Arkansas
Baseball — March 1/May 13
Softball — March 1/May 13

California
Baseball — March 19 /June 22, 24, 26
Softball — March 19/June 22, 24, 26

Colorado
Baseball — May 3/June 25-26
Softball — Fall season

Connecticut
Baseball — April 10/TBD
Softball — April 10/TBD

Delaware
Baseball — March 22/TBD
Softball — March 22/TBD

Florida
Baseball — Underway/May 19-22
Softball — Underway/May 18-22

Georgia
Baseball — Underway/May 21-24
Softball — Fall season

Hawaii
Baseball — TBD/TBD
Softball — TBD/TBD

Idaho
Baseball — March 10/May 21
Softball — March 10/May 21

Illinois
Baseball — April 5/June 19
Softball — April 5/June 19

Indiana
Baseball — March 29/June 18-19
Softball — March 22/June 11-12

Kansas
Baseball — March 28/June 25
Softball — March 28/June 25

Kentucky
Baseball — March 29/June 16-19
Softball — March 29/June 17-20

Louisiana
Baseball — Underway/May 13/14/15
Softball — Underway/May 1

Maine
Baseball — TBD/TBD
Softball — TBD/TBD

Maryland
Baseball — April 29/May 22
Softball — April 29/May 22

Massachusetts
Baseball — Third week of March/Third week of June
Softball — Third week of March/Third week of June

Michigan
Baseball — March 26/June 19
Softball — March 26/June 19

Minnesota
Baseball — April 8/June 19
Softball — April 8/June 19
Claire Davidson, Lakewood Ranch
Photo by Stacy White
Claire Davidson, Lakewood Ranch
Mississippi
Baseball — Underway/May 25-29
Softball — Underway/May 13-15

Missouri
Baseball — TBD/TBD
Softball — Fall season

Montana
Softball — March 20/May 21-23

Nebraska
Baseball — March 18/May 15, 17-20
Softball — Fall season

Nevada
Baseball — April 16/TBA
Softball — April 16/TBA

New Hampshire
Baseball — April 12/TBA
Softball — April 12/TBA

New Jersey
Baseball — April 19/June 1-20
Softball — April 19/June 1-20

New Mexico
Baseball — April 10/June 21-26
Softball — April 10/June 21-26

New York
Baseball — TBD/TBD
Softball — TBD/TBD

North Carolina
Baseball — April 26/June 25-26
Softball — March 15/May 14-15

North Dakota
Baseball — April 2/June 3-5
Softball — April 2/June 3-5

Ohio
Baseball — March 27/June 10-12
Softball — March 27/June 3-5

Oklahoma
Baseball — Underway/May 13-15
Softball — Fall season

Oregon
Baseball — April 12/TBD
Softball — April 12/TBD

Pennsylvania
Baseball — March 26/June 17-18
Softball — March 26/June 17-18

Rhode Island
Baseball — TBD
Softball — TBD

South Carolina
Baseball — March 15/June 1-5
Softball — March 15/June 1-5

South Dakota
Baseball — March 18/May 31-June 1
Softball — Fall season

Tennessee
Baseball — March 15/May 25
Softball — March 15/May 25

Texas
Baseball — Underway/June 9-12
Softball — Underway/June 2-5

Utah
Baseball — Underway/May 28-29
Softball — Underway/May 24-28

Vermont
Baseball — TBD
Softball — TBD

Virginia
Baseball — April 26/June 26-27
Softball — April 26/June 26-27

Washington
Baseball — March 1/May 29
Softball — March 1/May 29

West Virginia
Baseball — March 17/June 3-5
Softball — March 17/ May 26-27

Wisconsin
Baseball — April 27/June 29-30 July 1
Softball — April 27/June 28-30

Wyoming
Softball — TBD/May 20-22
High school basketball: OFFICIAL All-American Scoot Henderson set to skip senior year for NBA G League - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: MaxPreps All-American Scoot Henderson set to skip senior year for NBA G League
Five-star Class of 2022 high school basketball star Scoot Henderson of Kell (Marietta, Ga.) announced Friday on social media he will his senior year and join the NBA G League Ignite team.

Henderson is the first high school player to forgo his senior year to play in the G League. He won't be eligible for the 2022 NBA Draft because of age restrictions, meaning he must spend two years with the Ignite program.
The 6-foot-3 guard is the No. 9 prospect in the Class of 2022 according to 247Sports. He is expected to join Jaden Hardy, Michael Foster Jr. and international prospect Fanbo Zeng on the Ignite team next season.

Henderson was a first team MaxPreps Junior All-American selection this season, averaging 32 points, seven rebounds and six assists per contest to help the Longhorns reach the Georgia AAAAAA state title game. The explosive point guard showed rapid development over the course of his high school career and has the potential to be a lottery pick in the 2023 NBA Draft.

A year ago, Class of 2020 prospects Jalen Green, Jonathan Kuminga, Daishen Nix and Isaiah Todd selected the G League path over the traditional collegiate route.
Scoot Henderson in action during a December game against McEachern.
Photo by Ed Turlington
Scoot Henderson in action during a December game against McEachern.

High school basketball: Top four seeds advance to GEICO Nationals semifinals - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: Top four seeds advance to GEICO Nationals semifinals
It was chalk in Thursday's GEICO Nationals quarterfinal action as each of the top four teams in high school basketball advanced to Friday's semifinals. No. 1 Montverde Academy (Montverde, Fla.), No. 2 AZ Compass Prep (Chandler, Ariz.), No. 3 Sunrise Christian Academy (Bel Aire, Kan.) and No. 4 IMG Academy (Bradenton, Fla.) each took care of business during the tournament's second day.

IMG Academy takes on Sunrise Christian Academy at 2:30 p.m. (ET) Friday while Montverde Academy meets AZ Compass Prep at 4:30 p.m. with a trip to the finals on the line.

The Ascenders, the reigning event champion, fended off a late 22-7 run from No. 7 Milton (Ga.) to escape with a 73-68 victory in the opening contest. Although Milton (28-3) never led in the game, the scrappy public school battled from down 17 points in the second half to cut the deficit to one point with 1:25 remaining.

IMG Academy responded on its next possession with a corner 3 from junior Eric Dailey, followed by a critical defensive stop that resulted in a quick transition layup by five-star junior Jaden Bradley to stretch the lead to a comfortable six points with just 41 seconds remaining.

Bradley finished with a team-high 20 points to go along with six assists and four rebounds, while fellow five-star junior Jarace Walker chipped in 16 points, seven rebounds, four steals and three blocks off the bench for IMG Academy (21-2).

Ohio State pledge Bruce Thornton had 18 points, nine assists and six rebounds for Milton in the loss.

In the second quarterfinal contest, Sunrise Christian Academy (20-3) escaped with a 56-55 win against No. 12 Prolific Prep of Napa Christian (Napa, Calif.) as the Buffaloes finished the game on a 12-4 run to overcome their largest deficit of the game, a 51-44 deficit with 4:23 remaining.

A Kennedy Chandler steal and assist led to a Kendall Brown fast break dunk to give Sunrise Christian Academy a 54-53 advantage with 1:40 remaining, but Prolific Prep (31-4) responded with a pair of free-throws on the other end with 53 seconds remaining to give them the one-point edge.

On the other end, Kennedy Chandler penetrated the defense to draw a double team before kicking out to an open Zach Clemence, who attacked the closeout and finished with a game-winning reverse slam with 35 seconds remaining. A pair of defensive stops closed out the gritty win for the Buffaloes.

Brown, the Baylor signee, led all scorers with 21 points, while Tennessee-bound Chandler had 11 points, six steals, five assists and three rebounds.
Caleb Houstan, Montverde Academy
Photo by Annette Wilkerson
Caleb Houstan, Montverde Academy
A balanced attack led top-seed Montverde Academy (22-1) to a convincing 85-64 victory over Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Va.). The Eagles never trailed and held a comfortable lead throughout, leading by as many as 24 points early in the third period.

Michigan signee Caleb Houstan finished with a team-high 20 points, seven points and three rebounds, while No. 2 ranked junior center Jalen Duren had 15 points and nine rebounds.

Five-star junior MJ Rice scored 23 points and added four rebounds for the 20-9 Warriors.

AZ Compass Prep (28-1) overcame an abysmal first half to knock off No. 10 Wasatch Academy (Mt. Pleasant, Utah) 59-54 in the day's final contest.

After shooting just 5-of-23 from the field over the first two quarters, the Dragons responded with a second-half flurry, shooting 12-of-24 in the second half to outscore the Tigers 41-27.

MaxPreps National Player of the Year finalist TyTy Washington continued to bolster his impressive senior campaign, pumping in a game-high 22 points, 10 rebounds and five assists.

Fousseyni Traore finished with 20 points, four rebounds and three steals in the loss for Wasatch Academy (18-7).

GEICO Nationals schedule

Friday, April 2
Games on ESPN2 (Eastern time)
2:30 p.m. — Sunrise Christian Academy vs. IMG Academy
4:30 p.m. — Montverde Academy vs. AZ Compass Prep

Saturday, April 3

Game on ESPN
Noon — Championship