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Debreasha Powe named 2020-21 OFFICIAL Mississippi High School Girls Basketball Player of the Year - OFFICIAL
Debreasha Powe named 2020-21 MaxPreps Mississippi High School Girls Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Debreasha Powe of Meridian is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Mississippi High School Girls Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot junior was the key player in the Wildcats' 16-4 season, which was capped by reaching the Class 6A final four. With all but one player returning next season, the program will look to take the next step in 2021-22.

Powe averaged 19.6 points, 10.2 rebounds, 4.2 steals and 2.2 blocks per game. Though she is a post player, she can also step out and hit 3-pointers.

Not surprisingly, she has already received serious interest at the college level from Mississippi State.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team.
10 high school football stadiums named after NFL players as seen via Google Earth - OFFICIAL
10 high school football stadiums named after NFL players as seen via Google Earth
Video: Stadiums named after NFL players
See the view from above via Google Earth.

Athens (The Plains, Ohio) didn't waste any time in honoring its greatest athlete. It named the school's football stadium after Joe Burrow before he even took a professional snap from center.

According to Sports Illustrated, the Athens School District decided to rename the stadium after Burrow's heartfelt Heisman Trophy acceptance speech in which he named the school district.

Burrow's star continued to rise following the renaming as he led LSU to the national championship in January and was selected No. 1 in the NFL Draft by the Cincinnati Bengals in April.

Joe Burrow Stadium is one of 10 stadiums and football fields featured in our Google Earth series, which takes a new view of gridirons named after NFL players. See the full list below.

Joe Burrow Stadium: The stadium is where Burrow threw for 11,416 yards in a career in which he earned all-state honors.
Tony Romo Field: The latest field to be renamed at Burlington (Wis.), Tony Romo Field is located at Don Dalton Stadium. Dalton was Romo's coach at Burlington during the 1996 and 1997 seasons.
Joe Montana Stadium: Before leading the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowl championships, Montana was an all-state quarterback at Ringgold (Monongahela, Pa.).
John Elway Stadium: Elway was an All-American during his final two seasons at Granada Hills Charter (Granada Hills, Calif.) after transferring from Washington. The stadium seats 4,000 people and is located in the San Fernando Valley.
Emmitt Smith Field: The NFL's all-time leading rusher got his start at Escambia (Pensacola, Fla.), where he rushed for 8,804 yards and was named All-American.
Ronnie Lott Stadium: A native of New Mexico, Lott moved to Rialto, Calif., at a young age and attended Eisenhower. The school renamed the stadium in honor of the Hall of Famer safety in 2009.
Walter Payton Field: While Walter Payton College Prep High School can be found in Chicago, where he played his entire NFL career, Walter Payton Field is found at his high school alma mater in Columbia (Miss.).
Tony Dorsett Stadium: The all-time leading rusher in NCAA history by the time he finished his college career at Pitt, Dorsett began his career at Hopewell (Aliquippa, Pa.), where he was one of the top recruits in the country in 1973.
Brian Piccolo Memorial Stadium: While many NFL players have come from St. Thomas Aquinas (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), the stadium is named after a former Raider who was the subject of Emmy-winning movie "Brian's Song." Piccolo played for the Chicago Bears and died from cancer in 1970. Actor James Caan played the role of Piccolo in the 1971 TV movie.
Brady Family Stadium: The stadium at Serra (San Mateo, Calif.) is named not just for NFL quarterback Tom Brady, but for his family, as Brady requested. The stadium was renamed for the Brady family in 2012.
J.D. Davison named 2020-21 OFFICIAL Alabama High School Basketball Player of the Year - OFFICIAL
J.D. Davison named 2020-21 MaxPreps Alabama High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

J.D. Davison of Calhoun (Letohatchee, Ala.) is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Alabama High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot-3, 185-pound senior guard led the Tigers to a 16-8 record and the Class 2A semifinals.

Davison averaged 32.4 points, 10.8 rebounds, 4.9 assists and 3.6 steals per game. He scored 40 or more points in seven contests, including 45 points and 13 rebounds in the final game of his high school career, an 81-77 loss to Midfield.

Back in November, Davison opened his senior campaign with a career-high 57 points. He posted 14 double-doubles and a triple-double — finishing with 38 points, 11 rebounds, 11 assists and eight steals in Calhoun's first round state tournament contest.

An Alabama signee, Davison is regarded as the No. 9 prospect in the Class of 2021 according to 247Sports. He was announced as a McDonald's All-American last month.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team.
J.D. Davison is headed to the SEC to play for head coach Nate Oats at Alabama next year.
Photo by Brandon Sumrall
J.D. Davison is headed to the SEC to play for head coach Nate Oats at Alabama next year.
High school football: Mater Dei-St. John Bosco rivalry features impressive stats, rich history - OFFICIAL
High school football: Mater Dei-St. John Bosco rivalry features impressive stats, rich history
As vastly different as the 2020 California high school football season has been, the ending point is quite familiar. Even if it is in April 2021.

All eyes, computer screens, binoculars, smart phones and TV cameras will be focused on Santa Ana Stadium at 7 p.m. Saturday when Mater Dei (Santa Ana) and St. John Bosco (Bellflower) tangle to unofficially decide which is the best team not only in Southern California, but also the state and perhaps even the nation.

Just like it's been the last five years. Only no one is Christmas shopping.

The two national elites have been sparring, jabbing and throwing haymakers since 2016 to officially decide the Southern Section's Division I champion, which has parlayed into national ramifications, rankings and even championships.

St. John Bosco was crowned 2019 MaxPreps National Champion, while Mater Dei won it in 2017 and was second in 2018 and 2019. Heading into the fall of 2020, MaxPreps football editor Zack Poff had the Monarchs ranked No. 2 in the country and the Braves No. 3.
St. John Bosco takes the field before its season opener with Sierra Canyon.
File photo by Louis Lopez
St. John Bosco takes the field before its season opener with Sierra Canyon.
But California was one of 15 states to move football to 2021 due to the pandemic, erasing both programs from national-title consideration. Evaporation of the entire season in the state also seemed a distinct possibility, but politicians, health officials, coaching organizations, youth sports advocates and the California Interscholastic Federation finally were able to agree on a six-week campaign with no playoffs. 

Nothing in the short spring sample of nine games — five from Bosco and four by Mater Dei — has lessened their reputation nationally, according to Poff. IMG Academy (Bradenton, Fla.), Grayson (Loganville, Ga.) and Westlake (Austin, Texas) finished 1-2-3 in the final fall rankings.

"They (Mater Dei and Bosco) would both be right there in the mix no doubt," Poff said. "And with so many top young players on both sides, whoever wins Saturday has a real good shot to open the fall as preseason No. 1."

Which team will it be?

That's almost impossible to pick, just like it has been for the last 10 meetings since 2014, a year after Bosco, with quarterback Josh Rosen leading the charge, won its first state Open Division title.
Josiah Zamora (13) greets Cooper Barkarte (18) after a big catch.
File photo by Heston Quan
Josiah Zamora (13) greets Cooper Barkarte (18) after a big catch.
The teams have split the past 10 games, with the cumulative score being St. John Bosco 295, Mater Dei 287.
 
Since 2016, they've faced off twice each season with the Monarchs winning five of eight games total, but splitting the four section crowns — Bosco winning in 2016 and 2019 and Mater Dei claiming 2017 and 2018 titles. Each year those Southern Section champs went on to beat De La Salle (Concord) in the state Open Division title game.

Since 2004, Mater Dei has won 11 of the 20 meetings, but since Jason Negro took over Bosco in 2010, the Braves own a 9-6 edge. Mater Dei won six straight meetings starting in 2004 and the Braves won six straight starting in 2011.

History is simply a point of interest. Here are some more pertinent facts for the current season and Saturday's game.

• Bosco has outscored its opponents 266-91 (average score 53-18), Mater Dei's margin is 174-40 (44-10).

• Bosco averages 503 yards of offense per game (290 rushing, 213 passing), Mater Dei averages 418 (210 rushing, 208 passing).

• The teams have played four common Trinity League opponents with Mater Dei beating JSerra Catholic (San Juan Capistrano), 52-3, Orange Lutheran, 49-7, Servite (Anaheim), 24-17 and Santa Margarita (Rancho Santa Margarita), 49-13. Bosco beat the same opponents in order: 66-14, 55-0, 38-28 and 65-28.

• After graduating generational quarterbacks in 2020 — MaxPreps 2019 co-National Players of the Year in Bosco's DJ Uiagalelei (now at Clemson) and Mater Dei's Bryce Young (Alabama) — both teams are led by remarkably young, but polished signal-callers.

The Monarchs start freshman Elijah Brown, who has completed 60-of-84 passes for 770 yards, 11 touchdowns and one interception. Bosco has split time between sophomore Pierce Clarkson and junior Katin Houser with almost identical numbers, combining on 50-of-73 completions for 838 yards, 12 touchdowns and no interceptions. Both can run if nobody is open, combining for 258 yards and two scores.
St. John Bosco sophomore quarterback Pierce Clarkson has thrown for more than 400 yards and six touchdowns without an interception.
File photo by Louis Lopez
St. John Bosco sophomore quarterback Pierce Clarkson has thrown for more than 400 yards and six touchdowns without an interception.
• Top rushers: St. John Bosco — Jabari Bates (324 yards, 8.5 average, four TDs) and Rayshon Luke (267, 14.8, 4). Mater Dei — Raleek Brown (301, 7.2, 5) and Marceese Yetts (276, 6.6, 2).

• Top receivers: St. John Bosco — Jode McDuffie (12 catches, 267 yards, 4 TDs) and Chedon James (11, 211, 4); Mater Dei — Josiah Zamora (14, 157, 3) and CJ Williams (13, 184, 3).

• Top tacklers: St. John Bosco — Sione Hala (25 tackles), Andrew Simpson (20) and freshman Kyngstonn Viliamu-Asa (20). Mater Dei — Shoes Brinkley (15), Leviticus Su'a (12) and Sione Moa (12).

• Of all the numbers, none is more remarkable than this: 59.

That is the total number of players in Saturday's game who either have three-star recruiting rankings by 247Sports, or who have received an FBS scholarship offer. Of those, 31 belong to Bosco and 28 to Mater Dei. Only 14 of them are seniors.

3-STAR RANKING OR FBS OFFER: SEE ALL 59

When legendary Mater Dei coach Bruce Rollinson (314 wins, 85 losses, two ties according to Cal-Hi Sports record book) was asked this week to take in all that talent and how Saturday's game would shake out, he told Eric Sondheimer of the Los Angeles Times:

"It's their big men against my big men and their skills against my skills. … I think it's going to be like any other St. John Bosco-Mater Dei game in recent years. It's going to be a great high school football game."
Mater Dei's Elijah Brown is the fourth freshman to start at quarterback for the Monarchs, joining Todd Marinovich, Matt Barkley and JT Daniels.
File photo by Heston Quan
Mater Dei's Elijah Brown is the fourth freshman to start at quarterback for the Monarchs, joining Todd Marinovich, Matt Barkley and JT Daniels.
2021 NFL Draft: Trey Lance leads Top 10 under-the-radar high school players selected - OFFICIAL
2021 NFL Draft: Trey Lance leads Top 10 under-the-radar high school players selected
Dozens of high school football players every year miss the attention of experts and recruiters and eventually go on to productive college careers. But those surprise kids or late bloomers making it all the way the the NFL are extremely rare.

Here are 10 of the biggest surprise under-the-radar recruits who were selected in last week's 2021 NFL Draft.

1. Trey Lance
Marshall (Minn.) | Quarterback
Third pick (first round) | San Francisco 49ers

Though clearly recognized as a top athlete, Lance was projected more of a running back or safety, or even basketball player, coming out of Marshall. He had a late growth spurt. He played in a run-oriented offense and once attempted more than 20 passes in a game. One Big Ten school even offered him a scholarship as a linebacker.

He was ranked the No. 49 dual-threat quarterback in the country as a senior by 247Sports composite after throwing for 3,026 career yards and 33 touchdowns, while rushing for 1,177 yards and 18 more scores. The then 6-foot-4, 195-pounder (he's now listed at 224) had seven college offers, the biggest one from Boise State, before signing at North Dakota State, which produced Carson Wentz and Easton Stick.

"We always thought he'd be a running back," Longtime Marshall coach Terry Bahlmann told CBS Sports. "But in terms of athletes I had over the years, he'll go right to the top. He played strong safety for us, returned punts, returned kicks. I remember his freshman year, I told my wife, Jan, he was a special athlete. I just didn't know what he was gonna do yet."

2. Zaven Collins
Hominy (Okla.) | Linebacker
16th pick (first round) | Cardinals

A three-star recruit, Collins had one college offer and took it at the University of Tulsa. From the Class of 2017, he ranked 2,142nd overall by 247Sports, and the 148th best athlete. He obviously leaped over many on the way to 16th overall selection.

3. Payton Turner

Westside (Houston) | Defensive end
28th pick (first round) | Saints

Like Collins, he had one offer and he took it at the University of Houston. A two-star recruit, Turner was ranked the 272nd best player out of Texas from the Class of 2017 and 117th best defensive end in the country. His overall national recruiting rank: 2,548.

4. Richie Grant
Choctawhatchee (Fort Walton Beach, Fla.) | Safety
40th pick (second round) | Falcons

Another player with one offer, the two-star recruit signed at the University of Central Florida where he arrived as a wide receiver. From the Class of 2016, Grant's 247Sports Composite rankings: Florida (352), national receiver (357) and overall national (2,520).

5. Dillon Radunz
Becker (Minn.) | Offensive tackle
53rd pick (second round) | Titans

Without an FBS offer, Radunz instead attended FCS power North Dakota State where he starred with Lance. Radunz earned a national recruiting ranking, but it was at 3,828 and No. 165 as a defensive end. He found his calling on offensive side, plus he put on 36 pounds of muscle from high school.

6. Spencer Brown
Lenox (Iowa) | Offensive tackle
93rd pick (third round) | Bills

One of at least two who played 8-man football in high school, Brown did it all at Lenox, where he racked up 24 catches for 388 yards and seven touchdowns as a receiver. He also lettered in basketball and baseball, earning first-team all-conference in all sports. He had no stars or no offers out of high school, but grew to 6-9, 311 pounds by his third season at Northern Iowa. He entered at 6-8, 238.

7. Quinn Meinerz

Hartford (Wis.)| Offensive line
98th pick (third round) | Broncos

No recruiting stars as a prep, Meinzerz found his way to Division III Wisconsin-Whitewater. In high school, he earned All-State honors honorable mention, while also competing in wrestling, and track and field. He was attracted to Wisconsin-Whitewater's business program and glad they had a football squad.

8. Elerson Smith
Minneapolis South (Minneapolis) | Defensive end
116th pick (fourth round) | Giants
A teammate of Brown in college, Smith was a no-star recruit out of high school and Northern Iowa was his only offer. He entered at 6-6, 205 and left at 6-7, 245. He hasn't played since 2019.

9. Robert Rochell
Fair Park (Shreveport, La.) | Cornerback
130th pick (fourth round) | Rams

Another recruit with no stars, Rochell signed at the only FCS school that offered, Arkansas State. At Fair Park, he earned All-District and All-Shreveport honors in 2016 when he rushed for 922 yards and had 25 catches for 465 yards, but no interceptions (three pass breakups). He had speed, however, finishing third in the state 100 meters (10.8 seconds).

10. Jacob Harris
Palm Harbor University (Fla.) | Wide receiver
141st pick (fourth round) | Rams

The Rams went for back-to-back longshots, and a soccer player to boot. Harris didn't play football until his senior year at Palm Harbor and was recruited as a soccer player. He had five goals in 14 games as a senior. On the gridiron, he rushed for 231 yards, had 46 tackles at safety and 215 more yards as a returner. With no recruiting stars or offers, Harris walked on at Western Kentucky before transferring to UCF, where he didn't see significant playing time until he was a senior.