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High school basketball: Every national player of the year since 1922 - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: Every national player of the year since 1922
MaxPreps recently named Chet Holmgren of Minehaha Academy as the 2020-21 MaxPreps National Player of the Year, marking the 16th straight season the leader in high school sports has honored the top boys basketball player.

However, with the help of prior All-American teams and national player of the year honorees, MaxPreps has retroactively selected a National Player of the Year for the past 100 years. Other media outlets that have selected national players of the year include Gatorade, USA Today, The Atlanta Tipoff Club (Naismith Award), the National Mr. Basketball Award, chosen by many organizations including ESPN, Student Sports and currently by Ballislife.com. Mr. Basketball Awards also date back to 1955 due to retroactive selections by high school sports historian Doug Huff.

MaxPreps used these previous selections as guides, but also consulted other All-American teams along with all-state teams to choose its own list. Selections prior to 1955 were chosen based on all-state selections, national interscholastic tournament all-tournament teams, Chuck Taylor All-Star Game honorees and additional research through newspapers.com.

While hindsight makes choosing such retroactive player of the year honorees an easier task, MaxPreps tried to base selections on high school performance in real time and not base the player of the year choices on performance at the college and professional level.
LeBron James, seen watching his son Bronny play, was a two-time basketball player of the year.
File photo by Scott Reed
LeBron James, seen watching his son Bronny play, was a two-time basketball player of the year.
National Player of the Year winners since 1922

2021 — Chet Holmgren
School: Minnehaha Academy (Minneapolis)

Resume: Holmgren earned National Player of the Year honors after leading his team to four straight state championships and averaging 20.8 points, 12.6 points and 4.7 blocks per game. He committed to play at Gonzaga.

2020 — Cade Cunningham
School: Montverde Academy (Montverde, Fla.)

Resume: Before earning All-America first team honors as a freshman at Oklahoma State, Cunningham led the Eagles to a 25-0 record and a No. 1 ranking. Cunningham averaged 13.9 points, 6.4 assists and 4.2 rebounds as a senior.

2019 — Sharife Cooper
School: McEachern (Powder Springs, Ga.)

Resume: Led the Indians to a 32-0 record and a state championship. Only a junior, he averaged 28.6 points, 8.6 assists and 4.1 steals. He earned third-team honors as a senior in 2020 while averaging over 30 points per game.

2018 — RJ Barrett
School: Montverde Academy (Montverde, Fla.)

Resume: Barrett helped the Eagles to a 35-0 record and a No. 1 national ranking while averaging 28.7 points and 8.5 rebounds. He was All-America as a freshman at Duke and became the No. 3 overall pick in the 2019 draft by the New York Knicks.

2017 — Michael Porter Jr.
School: Nathan Hale (Seattle)

Resume: A unanimous National Player of the Year winner, Porter led Nathan Hale to a 29-0 record (after going 3-18 the year before) while averaging 37 points and 14 rebounds. He was the 14th overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft by the Denver Nuggets.

2016 — Lonzo Ball
School: Chino Hills (Calif.)

Resume: Led the Huskies to the No. 1 overall ranking in the nation and a California state championship. He averaged 23.9 points, 11.5 assists, 11.3 rebounds and 5.1 steals. He was the No. 3 overall pick in the 2017 NBA draft by the Lakers.

2015 — Ben Simmons
School: Montverde Academy (Montverde, Fla.)

Resume: A unanimous National Player of the Year winner, Simmons led Montverde to a 31-1 record and a No. 1 overall national ranking. He was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2016 NBA Draft and is a three-time NBA All-Star.

2014 — Stanley Johnson
School: Mater Dei (Santa Ana, Calif.)

Resume: The five media outlets that chose National Player of the Year winners each selected a different player with MaxPreps choosing Johnson. He averaged 25 points and 8 rebounds while leading Mater Dei to a state championship.

2013 — Jabari Parker
School: Simeon (Chicago)

Resume: Led the Wolverines to the state finals four years in a row, averaging 18.4 points and 10.4 rebounds as a senior. He was the No. 2 overall pick in the 2014 NBA Draft and has played for six NBA teams.

2012 — Kyle Anderson
School: St. Anthony (Jersey City, N.J.)
Resume: St. Anthony was 65-0 in Anderson's final two seasons. He averaged 14.7 points and 6.5 rebounds before heading to UCLA. He's in his seventh season in the NBA.

2011 — Austin Rivers
School: Winter Park (Fla.)

Resume: Son of 1980 National Player of the Year Glenn "Doc" Rivers, Austin led Winter Park to two straight Florida state titles and averaged 28 points as a senior. He was the No. 10 pick in the 2012 NBA Draft and he has played with six NBA teams.

2010 — Harrison Barnes
School: Ames (Iowa)

Resume: He led Ames to back-to-back state championships and 53 wins in a row while averaging 26.1 points and 10 rebounds. The No. 7 overall pick in 2012, Barnes is in his ninth NBA season.

2009 — Derrick Favors
School: South Atlanta (Atlanta)

Resume: Led the Hornets to a state championship and finished with 2,341 career points and 1,511 career rebounds. He was the No. 3 pick in 2010 and has played 11 NBA season.

2008 — Brandon Jennings
School: Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Va.)

Resume: Set a school record at Oak Hill with 1,312 points and a 35.5 average. He played in Europe for one season before entering the 2009 draft, where he was drafted 10th overall. He made the all-rookie team, but injuries ended his career by 2018.

2007 — Kevin Love
School: Lake Oswego (Ore.)

Resume: Led the Lakers to three straight state championship games, winning a title as a junior. He finished his career with 2,628 points, including 33.9 points and 17 rebounds as a senior. He's a five-time NBA All-Star and was the No. 5 overall pick in 2008.

2006 — Greg Oden
School: Lawrence North (Indianapolis)

Resume: A three-time All-American and a two-time National Player of the Year winner, Oden led Lawrence North to three straight state championships and 50 straight wins. The No. 1 overall pick in the 2007 NBA Draft, Oden was plagued by injuries and left the NBA in 2014.

2005 — Greg Oden
School: Lawrence North (Indianapolis)

Resume: Oden shared Parade Magazine National Co-Player of the Year honors with Monta Ellis, but Gatorade selected Oden as the nation's top player. He led Lawrence North to the second of three straight state championships.

2004 — Dwight Howard
School: Southwest Atlanta Christian (Atlanta)

Resume: Led his team to a 31-2 record and a state championship as a senior while averaging 25 points, 18 rebounds and 8.1 blocked shots. The No. 1 overall pick in the NBA Draft in 2004, Howard ranks 13th in NBA history in career rebounds.

2003 — LeBron James
School: St. Vincent-St. Mary (Akron, Ohio)

Resume: James led St. Vincent St. Mary to a No. 1 national ranking and he earned unanimous recognition as the nation's top player. He averaged 31.5 points as a senior and finished his career with 2,646 points. He is a 17-time NBA All-Star and a four-time MVP. He ranks No. 3 all-time in the NBA in career scoring.

2002 — LeBron James
School: St. Vincent-St. Mary (Akron, Ohio)

Resume: James averaged 29 points per game and was All-American for a second time and state MVP for a second time.

2001 — Dajuan Wagner
School: Camden (Camden, N.J.)

Resume: He caught everyone's attention when he scored 100 points in a game. He averaged 42.4 points per game to lead the nation. After a year at Memphis, Wagner entered the NBA Draft, but illness prematurely ended his career. His son DJ Wagner was named the MaxPreps National Sophomore of the Year in 2021.

2000 — Gerald Wallace
School: Childersburg (Ala.)

Resume: The USA Today player of the year after averaging 30 points, 18 rebounds and 6 assists. A first-round draft pick by Sacramento, Wallace played 15 seasons in the NBA.

1999 — Donnell Harvey
School: Randolph-Clay (Cuthbert, Ga.)

Resume: The national player of the year by USA Today and Naismith, Harvey averaged 23.3 points, 14 rebounds and 5 assists. A first-round draft pick by the Knicks in 2000, Harvey played five seasons in the NBA.

1998 — Al Harrington
School: St. Patrick, now known as Patrick School (Hillside, N.J.)

Resume: Won national player of the year honors from USA Today, Gatorade and Naismith before entering the NBA draft right out of high school. Played 16 seasons in the NBA averaging 25 points and 14 rebounds per game his senior year.

1997 — Tracy McGrady
School: Mount Zion (Gastonia, N.C.)

Resume: After transferring from Florida to Mount Zion, McGrady led his team to a 26-2 record while averaging 28 points. He entered the NBA draft after high school and was the ninth overall pick. He was a seven-time All-Star and was elected to the Hall of Fame.

1996 — Kobe Bryant
School: Lower Merion (Ardmore, Pa.)

Resume: Southeastern Pennsylvania's all-time leading scorer with 2,833 career points after averaging 30.8 points and 12 rebounds while leading Lower Merion to a state championship. He was an 18-time NBA All-Star and ranks fourth all-time in career scoring.

1995 — Kevin Garnett
School: Farragut (Chicago)

Resume: A two-time Parade All-America first teamer, Garnett averaged 25.9 points and 17.9 points as a senior. He was the fifth overall pick in the 1995 draft, coming right out of high school. He played 21 seasons in the NBA and was a 15-time All-Star.

1994 — Felipe Lopez
School: Rice (Manhattan, N.Y.), closed in 2011

Resume: Earned national player of the year honors from Student Sports, USA Today and Gatorade. He averaged 26.8 points per game while leading Rice to the Federation championship. He had a 13-season pro career, mostly overseas.

1993 — Rasheed Wallace
School: Simon Gratz (Philadelphia)

Resume: A two-time Parade All-American first-team member and averaged 16 points and 15 rebounds as a senior. He was the No. 4 overall pick in 1995 and played 18 seasons in the NBA

1992 — Jason Kidd
School: St. Joseph Notre Dame (Alameda, Calif.)

Resume: Led St. Joseph Notre Dame to two straight state championships and finished his career as the state's all-time leader in assists, according to the Cal-Hi Sports Record Book. Kidd was the No. 2 overall pick in the 1994 draft and played 20 seasons in the NBA.

1991 — Chris Webber
School: Detroit Country Day (Beverly Hills, Mich.)

Resume: Led his school to three state championships and was a Parade All-American as a junior and senior. He averaged 29.4 points as a senior. He was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1993 NBA draft, played 15 seasons in the NBA and was a 10-time all-star.

1990 — Damon Bailey
School: Bedford North Lawrence (Bedford, Ind.)

Resume: BAll-state all four years in high school and led Bedford North Lawrence to a state title in 1990. He averaged 28.4 points per game over his career with 3,134 points. Earned All-American honors at Indiana, but he never played above the CBA level professionally.

1989 — Kenny Anderson
School: Archbishop Molloy (Queens, N.Y.)

Resume: Earned unanimous national player of the year honors and was a three-time Parade All-American. Finished his career as New York's all-time leading prep scorer with 2,621 points. Played 15 seasons in the NBA.

1988 — Alonzo Mourning
School: Indian River (Chesapeake, Va.)

Resume: A unanimous selection as the national player of the year, Mourning led Indian River to a state title as a junior and 51 straight wins. As a senior he averaged 25 points, 15 rebounds and 12 blocked shots. He played 17 seasons in the NBA and was elected to the Hall of Fame.

1987 — Marcus Liberty
School: King (Chicago)

Resume: The USA Today national player of the year, Liberty led King to state championship as a junior and a second-place finish as a senior. Helped Illinois to the Final Four. Played only a few seasons in the NBA.

1986 — J.R. Reid
School: Kempsville (Virginia Beach, Va.)

Resume: Gatorade chose Reid as the national player of the year after he led Kempsville to a 22-2 record while averaging 24.6 points and 13.8 rebounds per game. The fifth overall pick in the 1989 draft, Reid spent 12 seasons in the NBA.

1985 — Danny Ferry
School: DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.)

Resume: Ferry led DeMatha to a 31-3 record while averaging 19.5 points and 12 rebounds. He was the Parade Magazine player of the year and went on to earn NCAA Player of the Year honors at Duke. The No. 2 pick in the 1989 draft, Ferry played 14 seasons in the NBA.

1984 — Delray Brooks
School: Rogers, consolidated to form Michigan City (Michigan City, Ind.) in 1995

Resume: The USA Today national player of the year, Brooks scored 2,324 points in his career after averaging 33.4 as a senior. He originally went to Indiana, but ended up at Providence where he helped lead the team to a Final Four appearance.

1983 — Reggie Williams
School: Dunbar (Baltimore)

Resume: The top player on a team generally regarded as the greatest high school team of all-time, Williams led Dunbar to a 29-0 record as a junior and 31-0 as a senior. He played on Georgetown's NCAA championship team in 1984 and was the No. 4 overall pick in the 1987 draft. He played 10 seasons in the NBA.

1982 — Benoit Benjamin
School: Carroll (Monroe, La.)

Resume: The state player of the year in Louisiana and regarded as the No. 1 recruit in the nation. He averaged 29.5 points, 19.5 points and 6 blocked shots as a senior. He was the No. 3 overall pick in the 1985 draft and played professionally for 14 seasons.

1981 — Patrick Ewing
School: Cambridge Rindge & Latin (Cambridge, Mass.)

Resume: A three-time Parade All-American, Ewing was the nation's No. 1 recruit ahead of the likes of Michael Jordan, Karl Malone and Charles Barkley. He scored 1,763 points in his career and led Rindge & Latin to a 96-5 record in his career.

1980 — Doc Rivers
School: Proviso East (Maywood, Ill.)

Resume: Scored 1,811 points in his career and averaged 22.3 points as a senior while earning Parade All-America honors. He played 14 seasons in the NBA and has been a coach for over 20 seasons. He currently ranks 10th all-time among NBA coaches with the most career wins.

1979 — Ralph Sampson
School: Harrisonburg (Va.)

Resume: Veteran scout Bill Cronauer gave Sampson the slight edge over fellow All-American Clark Kellogg in 1979 after Sampson led Harrisonburg to two straight Class AA state championships. He averaged 30.4 points per game and went on to earn All-American honors three times at Virginia. The No. 1 overall pick in the 1983 draft, Sampson played 13 seasons in the NBA.

1978 — Dwight Anderson
School: Dayton Roth, now Thurgood Marshall (Dayton, Ohio)

Resume: Considered the No. 1 recruit in the country after averaging 38.1 points per game as a senior and earning state player of the year honors. He played at Kentucky before transferring to USC. He played briefly in the NBA.

1977 — Gene Banks
School: West Philadelphia (Philadelphia)

Resume: The choice as MVP of the "Super Six," chosen by the St. Petersburg Times, over the likes of Albert King and Earvin "Magic" Johnson. He was the MVP of the Dapper Dan Classic and the McDonald's Capital Classic. Averaged 23 points and 20 rebounds while leading West Philadelphia to a 30-0 record. Earned All-America honors three straight years.

1976 — Darrell Griffith
School: Male (Louisville, Ky.)

Resume: Griffith earned national player of the year honors from Parade Magazine after scoring 24 points and grabbing 17 rebounds per game. He led Male to a state championship as a junior and he led Louisville to an NCAA championship in 1980. He played 11 seasons in the NBA.

1975 — Bill Cartwright
School: Elk Grove (Calif.)

Resume: Cartwright led the Thundering Herd to the Northern California Tournament of Champions and averaged 38.5 points and 22 rebounds per game. After an All-America career at USF, Cartwright was the No. 3 overall pick in the 1979 NBA Draft. He played 16 seasons in the NBA.

1974 — Moses Malone
School: Petersburg (Petersburg, Va.)

Resume: Malone went straight to the ABA out of high school, joining the Utah Stars. In high school, Malone led Petersburg to back-to-back state championships and 50 straight wins while scoring 2,124 career points. He was a three-time NBA MVP and played 21 seasons in the league.

1973 — Adrian Dantley
School: DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.)

Resume: Regarded as the best player legendary coach Morgan Wootten ever coached, Dantley earned All-American honors and was the MVP of the Dapper Dan All-Star Game in 1973. He averaged 25 points and 16 rebounds for a 26-1 DeMatha squad. He went on to a Hall of Fame career in the NBA.

1972 — Quinn Buckner
School: Thornridge (Dolton, Ill.)

Resume: An All-American in two sports, football and basketball, Buckner led a Thornridge team that is generally regarded as one of the best high school teams of all-time to an Illinois state championship. Buckner won an NCAA title at Indiana, an Olympic Gold Medal at Montreal in 1976 and an NBA title with the Boston Celtics.

1971 — Les Cason
School: East Rutherford (N.J.), closed in 1971. Now Becton (East Rutherford, N.J.)

Resume: A two-time Parade All-American and finished his career with 2,871 points while leading East Rutherford, and its coach Dick Vitale, to a pair of Group 1 championships. Cason's basketball career took a tragic turn when academics kept him out of Long Beach State (coached by Jerry Tarkanian) and he eventually flunked out of Rutgers. He died homeless at age 43 from complications due to AIDS.

1970 — Tom McMillen
School: Mansfield (Pa.)

Resume: A two-time Parade All-American, McMillen led the nation in scoring as a senior with an average of 47.7 points. He scored over 48 points 13 times and had a high of 67 points. Played in the NBA and became a United States Congressman.

1969 — George McGinnis
School: Washington (Ind.)

Resume: An All-American in football and basketball, McGinnis was a first team Parade All-American in basketball after scoring 1,009 points in 31 games. He scored 2,075 points in his career.

1968 — Ralph Simpson
School: Pershing (Detroit)

Resume: Teamed with Spencer Haywood in 1967 to win a state championship. Even more of a scorer as a senior, averaging 36 points per game, although Pershing did not return to the state finals. An all-star in the NBA and ABA.

1967 — Howard Porter
School: Booker (Sarasota, Fla.)

Resume: Considered at the time to be the greatest player to ever come out of Florida. Averaged 38 points per game in leading Booker to a 33-1 record. Became a three-time NCAA All-American at Villanova.

1966 — Calvin Murphy
School: Norwalk (Conn.)

Resume: Averaged 40.3 points per game in leading Norwalk to Class L championship. Scored 59 points in the championship game. Led the nation in scoring while in college at Niagara.

1965 — Lew Alcindor
School: Power Memorial

Resume: Finished with 96-6 career record, including 71 in a row, and 2,067 career points. First three-time Parade All-American. Named "Mr. Basketball" twice. Three-time NCAA Player of the Year and NBA Hall of Famer.

1964 — Lew Alcindor
School: Power Memorial

Resume: Finished the season with 55 wins in a row (22-0 in 1964) while averaging 27 points and 19 rebounds.

1963 — Edgar Lacy
School: Jefferson (Los Angeles)

Resume: Player of the Year in the Los Angeles City Section and a two-time Parade All-America first team selection. Lacy averaged 29.9 points per game as a senior.

1962 — Mike Silliman
School: St. Xavier (Cincinnati)

Resume: Mr. Basketball in Kentucky after leading St. Xavier to state title. Averaged 24.1 points and 20 rebounds while earning All-America honors by Parade and Scholastic Coach.

1961 — Bill Bradley
School: Crystal City (Mo.)

Resume: Regarded as greatest player to ever come out of Missouri at the time, Bradley averaged 36.1 points per game as a senior and had 3,066 in his career. Had an All-America career at Princeton.

1960 — Connie Hawkins
School: Boys  (Brooklyn, N.Y.)

Resume: Led Boys to two straight PSAL championships to go with 40 straight wins. Hawkins averaged 26.8 points per game and was first team Parade All-American.

1959 — Bill Raftery
School: St. Cecilia

Resume: The state player of the year in New Jersey and a Parade All-America first team player, Raftery set the state career scoring record with 2,151 points. After a 20-year coaching career, Raftery spent 30 years as a color analyst for CBS on NCAA basketball games.

1958 — Jerry Lucas
School: Middletown (Ohio)

Resume: Averaged 33 points per game and scored 2,460 in his career. Led Middletown to 76 straight wins, but lost in the semifinals in 1958. Named "Mr. Basketball" in 1957 and 1958. A three-time NCAA All-American and an NBA Hall of Famer.

1957 — Jerry Lucas
School: Middletown (Ohio)

Resume: Averaged 36 points per game in leading Middletown to undefeated record and state championship. All-state first team as a sophomore and junior, leading Middletown to No. 1 national ranking both seasons.

1956 — Oscar Robertson
School: Indianapolis Crispus Attucks (Indianapolis)

Resume: Averaged 24 points per game and led Crispus Attucks to a 62-1 record over two seasons with 45 straight wins. Became three-time NCAA All-America en route to Hall of Fame NBA career. Named "Mr. Basketball."

1955 — Wilt Chamberlain
School: Overbrook (Philadelphia)

Resume: Averaged 44.4 points per game in 19 games while leading Overbrook to a 18-1 record. Named All-American by Picture Week (Parade did not select All-Americans until 1957). Retired from NBA as league's all-time scorer.

1954 — Archie Dees
School: Mt. Carmel (Ill.)

Resume: One of only three people to be twice named the Big Ten Most Valuable Player, Dees got his start at Mt. Carmel, where he earned all-state honors and was named the MVP of the Chuck Taylor All-Star Game.

1953 — Earl Adkins
School: Ashland (Ky.)

Resume: The top vote-getter on the Kentucky All-State team, Adkins played in the Chuck Taylor All-Star Game and was named the contest's MVP. He scored 1,392 points in his career and he went on to play at the University of Kentucky.

1952 — Bruce Brothers
School: Quincy (Ill.)

Resume: Brothers earned MVP honors at the Chuck Taylor All-Star Game, making him the unofficial national player of the year and an All-American. Brothers was the top player in Illinois, earning all-state honors and finishing as the highest scorer in the state tournament.

1951 — Tom Gola
School: La Salle College (Wyndmoor, Pa.)

Resume: Scored over 1,700 points in his career and was a two-time all-state selection. He played in the Chuck Taylor All-Star Game and was named MVP, thus earning him national player of the year honors. He was a three-time All-America at La Salle College and a five-time All-Star in the NBA.

1950 — Bob Pettit
School: Baton Rouge (La.)

Resume: Although he didn't play high school basketball until a growth spurt following his sophomore year, Pettit led Baton Rouge to a state championship in 1950 and was named to the Chuck Taylor All-Star Game where he was named All-American. He had a Hall of Fame career in college at LSU and in the NBA.

1949 — Cliff Hagan
School: Owensboro (Owensboro, Ky.)

Resume: Led Owensboro to a state championship in 1949, scoring 41 points in the title game and 97 in the tournament, both tournament records. He averaged 24 points per game and was the top vote-getter on the all-state team. He had an All-America career at Kentucky and played 14 years in the NBA.

1948 — Bill Mikvy
School: Palmerton (Pa.)

Resume: Known at Temple as the "Owl without a Vowel", Milkvy set an NCAA record with 73 points in one game. In high school, he was the top player on the Pennsylvania all-state team, beating out the likes of future NCAA All-American Dick Groat.

1947 — Sherman White
School: Dwight Morrow (Englewood, N.J.)

Resume: Considered one of the greatest players to ever come from New Jersey, as he earned all-state honors as a senior by averaging 24.75 points per game (693 points in 28 games) while leading Morrow to a 28-0 record. White never played in the NBA, however, after becoming involved in a point-shaving scandal while he was playing at Long Island University. Prior to his arrest in the matter, White had been named the NCAA Player of the Year by the Sporting News.

1946 — Bob Cousy
School: Andrew Jackson (Cambria Heights, N.Y.), closed in 1994, reopened as Campus Magnet (Cambria Heights, N.Y.)

Resume: The top player in New York City, leading Jackson to the Queens borough championship while leading the city in scoring (according to his biography by Bill Reynolds). Cousy went on to an All-America career at Holy Cross, and a Hall of Fame career with the Boston Celtics.

1945 — Wallace "Wah Wah" Jones
School: Harlan (Ky.)

Resume: Believed to have set a national career scoring record of 2,162 points (Dwight Eddleman had already scored 2,702), Jones was all-state twice in basketball and football and once in baseball. He scored 828 points as a senior and led Harlan to a state title. All-America in college at Kentucky in both football (under coach Bear Bryant) and in basketball (under coach Adolph Rupp).

1944 — Alex Groza
School: Martins Ferry (Ohio)

Resume: Easily the leading scorer in the state as a senior while leading Martins Ferry to the state tournament, where it lost in the semifinals. Groza went on to an All-America career at Kentucky, but had a professional career cut short due to his involvement in an NCAA cheating scandal.

1943 — Arnie Ferrin
School: Ogden (Utah)

Resume:One of the leading scorers in Utah as a senior and he earned back-to-back all-state honors. In college, Ferrin led Utah to an NCAA championship as a freshman (where he was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player) and was All-America four years in a row.

1942 — Dwight Eddleman
School: Centralia (Ill.)

Resume: Scored 834 points in 39 games as a senior and was named to the all-state team for the third time. He finished his career with 2,702 career points, which would remain the national record for 27 years.

1941 — Dwight Eddleman
School: Centralia (Ill.)
Resume: In leading Centralia to a third-place finish after being upset in the semifinals by Morton, Eddleman was the highest scoring player in the country with 969 points in 45 games. He was also well on his way to becoming the nation's all-time leading scorer.

1940 — Andy Phillip
School: Granite City (Ill.)

Resume: An NCAA and Basketball Hall of Famer, Phillip led Granite City to a state championship in 1940 and earned all-state honors. He later earned National MVP honors while at Illinois as a member of the "Whiz Kids."

1939 — Allie Paine
School: Central (Oklahoma City, Okla.), closed in 1981

Resume: Earned all-state honors while leading Central to the state championship game. He went on to an All-America career at Oklahoma, where he helped lead the Sooners to the NCAA finals in 1947.0

1938 — Otto Graham
School: Waukegan (Ill.)

Resume: One of the leading scorers in the state, Graham earned all-state first team honors. Also a standout football players, Graham graduated at midyear in 1939 and headed to Northwestern before embarking on a Hall of Fame football career. He also earned All-America honors in basketball while at Northwestern.

1937 — George Glamack
School: Allentown Prep (Pa.), closed in 1939

Resume: One of the leading scorers in the northeast as a senior at Allentown Prep, Glamack went on to an All-America career at North Carolina. According to his UNC bio, Glamack was known as the "Blind Bomber" due to poor eyesight and he relied on the lines on the floor to guide his shooting.

1936 — Ralph Vaughn
School: Frankfort (Ind.)

Resume: Vaughn was a high-scoring forward at Frankfort, earning all-state honors two seasons and leading Frankfort to a state championship in 1936. He was an All-American at Southern California as a senior.

1935 — Lou Boudreau
School: Thornton (Harvey, Ill.)

Resume: Known more for his Hall of Fame baseball career, Boudreau was a standout basketball player at Thornton. He led the team to three straight state championship games, finishing first in 1933. He made the all-state team three times, earning state MVP honors twice. He was an All-America in college at Illinois before embarking on a professional baseball career.

1934 — Meyer Bloom
School: Trenton Central (Trenton, N.J.)

Resume: Bloom earned all-state honors twice and helped Trenton Central to a 71-2 record and three state championships from 1932-34. He went on to a Hall of Fame career at Temple.

1933 — Hank Luisetti
School: Galileo (San Francisco)

Resume: Luisetti with his one-handed shooting style that enabled him to become the first college player to score 50 points in a game while at Stanford. At Galileo, he was the San Francisco City player of the year by the San Francisco Examiner.

1932 — Rip Kaplinsky
School: Jefferson (Brooklyn, N.Y.)

Resume: Named the captain of the Jefferson team as a sophomore, Kaplinsky was lauded as one of the best players to ever play in the PSAL at the time. He went on to play three seasons at St. John's and played professionally in early versions of professional basketball.

1931 — Norman Cottom
School: Wiley, consolidated to become Terre Haute South Vigo (Terre Haute, Ind.)

Resume: Cottom earned all-state honors and was recognized with the Gimbel Award following the state tournament for his mental attitude. He was a two-time All-American while at Purdue.

1930 — Ed "Moose" Krause
School: De La Salle (Chicago)

Resume: One of the all-time great athletes to play at Notre Dame, lettering in four sports and earning All-America honors in basketball three times. He was part of the great De La Salle (Chicago) teams that won back-to-back National Catholic Interscholastic Tournament championships in 1929 and 1930.

1929 — Elwood Romney
School: Dixie (St. George, Utah)

Resume: A three-time first team all-state player, including captain his senior year, Romney went on to earn All-America honors at BYU. He was a cousin of Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican Presidential candidate.

1928 — Ellis Johnson
School: Blazer (Ashland, Ky.)

Resume: Johnson was the top player for an Ashland team that won the National Invitational Tournament with a 15-10 win over Canton. Johnson earned all-tournament honors and went on to play three sports at Kentucky where he was an inaugural member of the school's Hall of Fame.

1927 — John Wooden
School: Martinsville (Ind.)

Resume: Wooden led his team to three straight state championship games, winning the title in 1927 as a junior. He was a college All-American at Purdue for three seasons before embarking on a coaching career that included 10 NCAA titles at UCLA.

1926 — Branch McCracken
School: Monrovia (Ind.)

Resume: Considered a "big man" at 6-foot-4, McCracken led small-town Monrovia to a pair of tri-state tournament championships in 1925 and 1926 and was named the MVP of the tournament as a senior. He went on to play at Indiana and as a coach led Indiana to a pair of national championships.

1925 — Berry Dunham
School: Wichita, now known as East (Wichita, Kan.)

Resume: Dunham was the captain of a Wichita team that won the National Invitational Tournament in Chicago with a 27-6 win over El Reno (Okla.). Dunham earned all-tournament honors and went on to be a three-time AAU All-American from 1930-32 while leading a Wichita AAU team to three straight national championships.

1924 — Bennie Oosterbaan
School: Muskegon (Mich.)

Resume: A four-sport star in high school, Oosterbaan earned All-America honors as a junior by making the all-tournament team at the national invitational in Chicago. At Michigan, Oosterbaan went on to become a three-time All-American in football, a two-time All-American in basketball and an All-Big Ten selection in baseball.

1923 — Herb Proudfit
School: Kansas City, now known as Wyandotte (Kansas City, Kan.)

Resume: Kansas City, now known as Wyandotte, won the National Invitational Tournament in Chicago with a 43-21 win over Rockford (Ill.). Proudfit was the top player on a team that went 33-0 including a 234-2 win over the Rainbow Club and also earned all-tournament honors.

1922 — Bobby Thompson
School: Passaic (N.J.)

Resume: Thompson was the top player on the "Wonder Team" from Passaic that went 33-0 en route to a 159-game win streak between 1919 and 1925. Thompson is believed to be the first player to score over 1,000 points in a season, although his exact total is not known.
Texas high school football championships: No. 4 Westlake takes down No. 10 Southlake Carroll as father beats son for 6A Division I title - OFFICIAL
Texas high school football championships: No. 4 Westlake takes down No. 10 Southlake Carroll as father beats son for 6A Division I title
Saturday's Texas 6A Division I high school football championship game was a back-and-forth flurry for 18 minutes. After that, No. 4 Westlake (Austin) dominated, scoring 31 unanswered points en route to its second straight title and third overall with a 52-34 victory over No. 10 Southlake Carroll (Southlake, Texas) at AT&T Stadium in Arlington.

The game had it all in terms of storylines. It was the first Texas state championship game pitting father and son head coaches — Westlake's Todd Dodge and son Riley at Carroll. It also had a compelling quarterback matchup with junior Cade Klubnik of Westlake outdueling junior Ohio State pledge Quinn Ewers, the nation's No. 1 Class of 2022 prospect.

Klubnik, a fleet and poised 6-foot-3, 185-pounder, was nearly flawless, completing 18 of 20 passes for 220 yards while rushing for 97 more. He accounted for three touchdowns.
Westlake junior quarterback Cade Klubnik celebrates a first-half touchdown during his team's 52-34 victory over Southlake Carroll at AT&T Stadium.
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Westlake junior quarterback Cade Klubnik celebrates a first-half touchdown during his team's 52-34 victory over Southlake Carroll at AT&T Stadium.
Zane Minors (12 carries, 137 yards) set the tone with a 75-yard touchdown run on Westlake's first play from scrimmage. The Chaparrals never really slowed down from there, piling up 528 yards of offense – including 308 on the ground.

Grey Nakfoor added 74 yards rushing including touchdown runs of 39, 4 and 5 yards as the Chaps (14-0) flipped a 2006 championship game result versus the same Southlake Carroll program.

The Dragons won that 5A Division I title game 43-29 when Todd Dodge was the coach and Riley was his quarterback. It was Dodge's fourth championship as coach for the Dragons and after the game he went the college route before landing at Westlake in 2014. He's gone 84-12 since and is now 218-70 overall with six state crowns.

In his third season as head coach, Riley (38-4) was hoping to lead the Dragons (12-2) to their ninth state title and first since 2011. Instead he got a bear hug from his dad afterward and a second-place trophy in Texas' largest classification.

"I told him I loved him," Todd Dodge said in a postgame interview on Fox Southwest TV. "I told him I was so proud of him. I told him he had one heck of a football team. ... It was a slug-fest. Our defense answered the bell the second half. That was one for the ages right there."

It was especially tight and entertaining in the first 18 minutes with the game tied at 21-21.

But that's when the Chaps caught fire, scoring the game's next 31 points to go up 52-21 late in the third quarter, the last score on a 5-yard run by Nakfoor, his 20th of the season. It's just what Todd Dodge asked for at halftime, "to keep scoring," because of the Ohio State-bound Ewers and the Dragons' how powered offense.

The 57-year-old Dodge still feared Carroll would comeback and they did with a 10-yard touchdown pass from Ewers to R.J. Maryland, a recovered onside kick and a second short touchdown run by sophomore Owen Allen.
Westlake head coach Todd Dodge proudly hoists the state championship trophy amongst his players.
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Westlake head coach Todd Dodge proudly hoists the state championship trophy amongst his players.
But it was too little too late for the Dragons, who last week upset a Duncanville that had eliminated them the last two seasons in the playoffs. 

They simply couldn't match Westlake's power up front or the balance on offense, orchestrated beautifully by Klubnik, rated the seventh best pro-style quarterback in the country. Judging from his speed and elusiveness — Todd Dodge calls him "twitchy" — Klubnik looks more of a dual threat than strictly a pocket passer.

The Chaps averaged 7.9 yards per carry, compared to 2.1 for Carroll, plus Klubnick was precise on his passes. "That's the best game we've played offensively all year," Todd Dodge said.

The first four possessions of the game produced four touchdowns and it took less than nine minutes.

Allen capped a 75-yard, 10-play drive with a 3-yard touchdown to give Southlake Carroll a 7-0 lead. But it took just one play and 12 seconds for Westlake to respond as the speedy Minors zipped around right end 75 yards for a score to tie it at seven.

Back came Ewers, firing a 49-yard touchdown bomb to Minnesota-bound wideout Brady Boyd, making it 14-7. Undaunted, the Chaps drove 79 yards, finished off with a 39-yard touchdown run by Nakfoor, tying the score at 14-14 with 3:07 left in the first quarter.

Westlake finally got a stop and then took its first lead, when impressive 6-foot-3, 210-pound sophomore receiver Jaden Greathouse (five catches, 103 yards) hauled in a 15-yard touchdown pass from Klubnik, making it 21-14 with 10:51 left in the half.
Southlake Carroll quarterback Quinn Ewers threw for 350 yards and three touchdowns.
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Southlake Carroll quarterback Quinn Ewers threw for 350 yards and three touchdowns.
Figuring stops were at a premium, Riley Dodge went for it on a 4th-and-1 call from his own 34 and Ewers delivered with a 26-yard completion to tight end Maryland. That set up Ewers' second TD connection with Boyd (12 catches, 189 yards), this one from 28 yards, tying the game at 21-21 with 6:44 left in the second quarter.

Ewers finished 23 of 39 for 350 yards and three touchdowns. He also threw a pair of picks, both by the defensive Player of the Game, Michael Taaffe. One led to a touchdown, the other prevented one.

Klubnik and Chaps showed some determination on their next drive, fighting off three key penalties, one nullifying a touchdown, to take a 28-21 halftime lead on a 75-yard scoring drive. Klubnik finished it off with a 1-yard keeper with 1:12 left in the second.

Ewers was intercepted by Taaffe right before halftime to keep Westlake in front. By that time, Westlake had piled up 298 total yards, including 171 on the ground. Carroll had 250 yards.

Westlake struck twice quick in the third quarter.
Zane Minors, Westlake running back
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Zane Minors, Westlake running back
Nakfoor finished off a 75-yard drive with his second touchdown, a 4-yard run, making it 35-21. A 44-yard scamper by Klubnik keyed the drive.

Klubnik rushed for his second touchdown less than three minutes later on a 4-yard run, giving the Chaps a 42-21 lead. That score was set up by Taafee's second interception, a tremendous, leaping one-handed grab, that gave Westlake the ball at the Carroll 24. Four plays later the Chaps had a three-touchdown edge with 6:48 left in the third quarter. They were on their way from there.

Taafee said the Chaps won it for their coach, but said "He tells us to do it for each other. I wish I could put into words how much we put into this."

They had to put in even more after the Dragons piled up 250 of their 399 total yards in the first half.

"That quarterback they have is one hell of a player and frankly I was a little nervous," Taafee said. "They kicked us in the mouth with those first couple drives. We had to ask ourselves 'do we want them to keep it up or our we going to stop them?' We did a better job the second half."

Said Todd Dodge: "We had to will our way to this win. We survived a shootout early."

The game was the last of 12 state championship contests in Texas, which delayed its season for large schools by six weeks due to the pandemic. Riley Dodge missed his team's 34-27 semifinal victory over Duncanville after a positive test for the virus.

"Obviously we're super disappointed in the outcome tonight," Riley Dodge told the Dallas Morning News after the game. "I'm proud of the way our kids fought, they never gave up. I thought our kids had great character tonight."

Before the game, Elizabeth Dodge, Todd's wife and Riley's mom told Fox Southwest, "This is the most awesome moment of my life. It's overwhelming really. I just want both teams to play well."

Clearly, the Chaparrals played a little better, though they were flagged 13 times for 117 yards. Three of those penalties nullified three touchdowns, including a scintillating 62-yard touchdown run down the left sideline by Klubnik in the third quarter.

Westlake shook off the penalties and persevered when it needed to most. Much like when it dethroned two-time defending 6A-1 champion North Shore (Houston) 24-21 last week. North Shore took its first lead of that game with 4:30 remaining — Westlake's first deficit of the entire season — only for the Chaps to drive 69 yards for the game-winning touchdown three minutes later on a touchdown run by Klubnik.

"Collectively this group loves football more than any team I've ever seen," Todd Dodge said. "Like every team in American, they've had so many things to overcome this season. I can't tell you how proud of them I am. That was one hell of a game tonight."
Brady Boyd, Carroll receiver
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Brady Boyd, Carroll receiver
Cade Klubnik, Westlake quarterback
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Cade Klubnik, Westlake quarterback
Westlake running back Greg Nakfoor leaps over a Southlake Carroll defender.
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Westlake running back Greg Nakfoor leaps over a Southlake Carroll defender.
Westlake cornerback Michael Taaffe was selected the game's defensive MVP after intercepting two passes and recording five tackles.
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Westlake cornerback Michael Taaffe was selected the game's defensive MVP after intercepting two passes and recording five tackles.
Westlake players celebrate winning their second consecutive state championship trophy.
Photo by Robbie Rakestraw
Westlake players celebrate winning their second consecutive state championship trophy.
Girls high school basketball rankings: No. 21 Valley Vista returns to OFFICIAL Top 25 after Arizona reverses course on season - OFFICIAL
Girls high school basketball rankings: No. 21 Valley Vista returns to MaxPreps Top 25 after Arizona reverses course on season
There has never been a season like this one — and hopefully there never will be again.

Though some teams have been able to play a nearly full schedule, others have yet to start, and many key games have been canceled. The result? The Top 25, which always contains a fair amount of guesswork, is even more chancy than in the past. As always, we are sure the 25 we've listed are very good teams, and they deserve full respect for their achievements, but it must be noted that a lot of teams that might have been on this list aren't likely to play.

In fact, No. 24 Chiawana may drop out next week if Washington cancels its season, and California's governing body meets Jan. 25 to determine if the Golden State's teams will even be allowed to play in the spring. And yet, at the same time, No. 21 Valley Vista returned the rankings after the state of Arizona reversed course and allowed the basketball season to be played.

So who knows what's next? We don't, that's for sure, but all credit to the coaches, players and staff who've made it this far, whether they're in the Top 25 or not.

(NOTE: Please update schedules and results on MaxPreps. If there are issues, please reach out to [email protected] for assistance.)

MaxPreps Top 25 Girls High School Basketball Rankings

Record: 11-0 | Last week: 1
A key game against powerful Plant scheduled for Saturday has been canceled. The Highlanders have played one game in 2021. It's hoped the Jan. 29 matchup with Colonial will mark the No. 1 team's return to action.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 2
Several Washington Catholic Athletic Conference teams have canceled their seasons, but the Mustanges are set to begin play Feb. 3 against Elizabeth Seton.

Record: 11-0 | Last week: 3
A big win Monday over strong Forest Park cements Lions' No. 3 ranking. Next up is a rematch Jan. 26 with a solid Langston Hughes team.

Record: 1-0 | Last week: 4
One of the most talented teams in the country, the Royals have begun league play. There may not be many tests the rest of the way, but at least Hopkins is playing again.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 5
The Pioneers are set to begin play Jan. 27.

Record: 15-0 | Last week: 6
The Cougars finish the regular season with four games against teams it handled easily the first time around.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 7
Though the Cadets have been playing as a club team, none of the results are official. It's anticipated St. John's will be able to play as a high school in the near future.

Record: 12-0 | Last week: 8
The Red Knights beat Westminster Christian by four the first time around, so Friday's rematch could be a serious test.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 9
The Lancers get in the mix Jan. 21 against Raritan, but right now, the schedule calls for only 11 games.

Record: 19-0 | Last week: 10
The Cougars rolled over previously unbeaten Jersey Village 92-31 but Memorial and Cypress Ridge could be more of a challenge. Or not.

Record: 7-0 | Last week: 11
Oklahoma is loaded this year, but so far the Tigers look to the best. But Sooner State fans are already circling Feb. 11, when Classen SAS comes to Norman.

Record: 15-0 | Last week: NR
With wins over Wayne and Reynoldsburg — among others — the Wildcats jump into the Top 25 as Ohio's best. But Pickerington Central is the Jan. 20 opponent, so there's not much margin for error.

Record: 11-0 | Last week: 13
The Redskins play in a local tournament this weekend, and then draws 10-4 Bixby on Tuesday.

Record: 13-1 | Last week: 14
The Eagles get a serious test against 16-1 Plant on Friday, but there are only two more regular season games after that.

Record: 21-0 | Last week: 16
Hoover's game with perennial Georgia power St. Francis was canceled, but with 22-1 Hazel Green on the schedule Saturday, the Buccaneers have another chance to show just how good they are.

Record: 10-0 | Last week: 18
The Tigers have been on a break, but jump right in against 8-1 Father Ryan next Tuesday.

Record: 4-2 | Last week: 17
Next up for talented New Hope is Paul VI on Jan. 28, but it's possible coach Sam Caldwell will find some willing opponents before then.

Record: 12-0 | Last week: 20
The Silverwolves jump two spots, but 10-1 Syracuse, Friday's opponent, will show whether they deserved the bump.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 19
The Argonauts begin the season Feb. 2

Record: 14-1| Last week: 21
The Eagles' ranking is a reflection of a very talented roster, but to keep it, a Saturday win over No. 23 Duncanville, at home, is mandatory.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: NR
Despite mounting COVID cases, Arizona's high school association reversed its decision to cancel winter sports — which means the Monsoon not only jump back into the rankings, but will play three games in the next week.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 22
The Vikings plan to begin Jan. 29, and will face an "early" test Feb. 2 vs. Neumann-Goretti.

Record: 19-1 | Last week: 23
The Panthers have already lost to DeSoto once, and now must try to deal with DeSoto's height and talent on the road.

Record: 0-0 | Last week: 24
Even if the Riverhawks are given permission to play, star Talia Von Oelhoffen graduated early so she could start playing at Oregon State — which will make it very hard for Chiawana to hang on to this spot even if Washington allows basketball.

Record: 10-0 | Last week: 25
The talented Wildcats have a fairly easy week ahead, though it's always tough to play three games in that span of time, as Mississippi's best must do.

Dropped out: No. 12 Reynoldsburg (Ohio), No. 15 Sidwell Friends (Washington D.C.) season canceled.
High school basketball: No. 1 Montverde Academy survives GEICO Nationals upset bid with 51-49 win over AZ Compass Prep - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: No. 1 Montverde Academy survives GEICO Nationals upset bid with 51-49 win over AZ Compass Prep
Five-star Michigan signee Caleb Houstan tipped in the game winner with 17 seconds left as top-ranked Montverde Academy (Montverde, Fla.) survived an upset scare Friday by No. 2 AZ Compass Prep (Chandler, Ariz.) in the GEICO Nationals semifinals. The Eagles' 51-49 win sets up a championship showdown at noon (ET) Saturday against No. 3 Sunrise Christian Academy, which has beaten the No. 1 team in the MaxPrep Top 25 once this season.

Trailing 42-33 entering the fourth quarter, AZ Compass Prep responded with a 9-0 run to tie the game at 42 midway through the fourth quarter. The teams traded blows down the stretch before Creighton pledge Ryan Nembhard knocked down a 3-pointer at the end of the shot clock with 1:19 left to give the Eagles a 49-47 advantage.

MaxPreps National Player of the Year finalist TyTy Washington responded on the other end with a nice step-through layup to knot things up at 49. Houstan's game winning tip-in on the other end gave the Eagles the winning advantage, as Washington's last second 3-point attempt rimmed-out.

Jalen Duren, the No. 2 prospect in the Class of 2022, finished with a team-high 14 points and nine rebounds, while Nembhard added five points, nine assists and four rebounds for Montverde (23-1).
Jalen Duren had a team-high 14 points for Monverde Acadmey.
Photo by Pete Wright
Jalen Duren had a team-high 14 points for Monverde Acadmey.
Washington finished his impressive senior campaign with 15 points, five assists and four rebounds in the loss.

It was Montverde Academy's second win of the season over the 28-2 Dragons, who fell 76-65 in overtime on Jan. 28.

The Eagles seeks their fifth GEICO Nationals title in their first championship appearance since 2018. Montverde Academy leads the season series 2-1, beating the Buffaloes 61-57 three weeks ago.

GEICO Nationals championship

Friday's semifinal results
Montverde Academy 51, AZ Compass Prep 49
Sunrise Christian Academy 70, IMG Academy 63

Saturday, April 3
Game on ESPN
Noon (ET) — No. 3 Sunrise Christian Academy vs. No. 1 Montverde Academy
North Carolina high school football rankings: Zebulon B. Vance crowned 2020-21 OFFICIAL Champion, finishes No. 1 - OFFICIAL
North Carolina high school football rankings: Zebulon B. Vance crowned 2020-21 MaxPreps Champion, finishes No. 1
The high school football season in North Carolina has come to a close with eight teams claiming NCHSAA titles. Class 4AA champion Zebulon B. Vance was among the winners, defeating Rolesvile 35-14 in the final and finishing No. 1 in the final MaxPreps Top 25 state computer rankings.

That victory, coupled with its 10-1 record and tremendous play this season, makes Vance the 2020-21 MaxPreps Champion for the state of North Carolina.

Quarterback Austin Grier, voted the title game's MVP, threw for 200 yards and three touchdowns, two going to Asuani Allen in the third quarter to put the game away. It was the second straight 4AA championship for the Cougars, who piled up 531 total yards, including 331 on the ground. Jalen Swindell was named the game’s Most Outstanding Defensive Player by recording a sack and six tackles. His team gave up 67 total yards.

Sophomore Dylan Smothers rushed 12 times for 97 yards and a touchdown and teammate Joseph Morris added 86 yards rushing on 11 carries.

The Cougars, who finished the season outscoring opponents 435-125, repeated as champions for the first time in school history. It will be the last time the school is called Vance, changing its name to Julius Chambers, a civil rights leader, in the summer. As an inspiration throughout the season, the Cougars used the social media hashtag, #TheLastVance.

“We’re a humble team, but we’re a confident team,” Vance coach Glenwood Ferebee told the Charlotte Observer. “We feel like every time (we) go out and do what (we’re) supposed to do, we can win. Our biggest obstacle was us and it’s going to always be us. As long as we can take care of business, with talent we have and the coaching staff we have, I think we’ll be fine for next 2-3 years.”

Of the seven other teams crowned champions, Grimsley (10-0), Mount Tabor (11-0), Reidsville (10-0) and Tarboro (9-0) all finished unbeaten. It took great resolve to finish this first spring season after postponing the traditional fall season due to the pandemic.
Asuani Allen running the ball for Vance in its 4AA championship win over Rolesvile on Saturday at North Carolina State's Finley Stadium.
Photo by Tom Masters
Asuani Allen running the ball for Vance in its 4AA championship win over Rolesvile on Saturday at North Carolina State's Finley Stadium.
2020-21 NCHSAA state champions

Class 4AA — Zebulon B. Vance (Charlotte)
Class 4A — Grimsley (Greensboro)
Class 3AA — Mount Tabor (Winston-Salem)
Class 3A — Charlotte Catholic (Charlotte)
Class 2AA — Salisbury
Class 2A — Reidsville
Class 1AA — Tarboro
Class 1A — Murphy

Final North Carolina MaxPreps Top 25

# School Rec. Str. +/-
1ZBVHS (Charlotte)10-134.2--
2Grimsley (Greensboro)10-026.6--
3MTHS (Winston-Salem)11-026.1--
4Weddington (Matthews)6-129.0--
5CCHS (Charlotte)9-130.6+4
6Reidsville10-09.3+4
7Hough (Cornelius)8-129.7-2
8DWBHS (Matthews)8-225.3-1
9Cleveland (Clayton)10-119.6-1
10Havelock10-114.8-4
11Tarboro9-05.7+3
12CGHS (Raleigh)9-121.1-1
13Myers Park (Charlotte)9-125.1--
14Rolesville8-123.6-2
15Salisbury9-215.2+6
16Lake Norman (Mooresville)5-226.3-1
17Dudley (Greensboro)8-218.7--
18Monroe7-328.1+2
19CCHS (Charlotte)6-117.6-3
20Ardrey Kell (Charlotte)6-221.1-1
21West Forsyth (Clemmons)4-118.4-3
22EFHS (Kernersville)3-439.5+5
23Glenn (Kernersville)5-229.5+1
24Davie (Mocksville)5-224.4+2
25Mallard Creek (Charlotte)4-327.0-2