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OFFICIAL/AVCA Players of the Week - OFFICIAL
MaxPreps/AVCA Players of the Week
MaxPreps/AVCA High School Players of the Week
For the week of Oct. 19-25

Alabama
6'0" | Freshman | S/RS
12 Sets Played

Assists: 134
Assists/Game: 11.17
Team Hitting%: 0.182
Digs: 18
Digs/Game: 1.5
Aces: 5

Arizona
5'9" | Senior | OH
10 Sets Played

Kills: 64
Kills/Game: 6.4
Digs: 42
Digs/Game: 4.2
Receptions: 55
Rcpt/Game: 5.5
Aces: 10

Arkansas
6'1" | Senior | RS/OH
6 Sets Played

Kills: 48
Kills/Game: 8
Digs: 4
Digs/Game: 0.67

Connecticut

6'3"  | Junior | OH/OPP
7 Sets Played

Kills: 41
Kills/Game: 5.86
Digs: 16
Digs/Game: 2.29
Receptions: 23
Rcpt/Game: 3.29
Aces: 6
Blocks: 3

Florida
6'4" | Sophomore | RS/OH/MB
4 Sets Played

Stats
Kills: 24
Kills/Game: 6
Digs: 6
Digs/Game: 1.5
Aces: 4
Blocks: 3

Georgia
5'11" | Senior | S/DS
6 Sets Played

Assists: 72
Assists/Game: 12
Team Hitting%: 0.411
Digs: 8
Digs/Game: 1.33
Aces: 5

Idaho
5'10" | Senior | MH/OH
5 Sets Played

Kills: 30
Kills/Game: 6
Digs: 21
Digs/Game: 4.2
Receptions: 27
Rcpt/Game: 5.40
Blocks: 4

Indiana
5'10" | Sophomore | OH
10 Sets Played

Kills: 73
Kills/Game: 7.3
Digs: 42
Digs/Game: 4.2
Receptions: 29
Rcpt/Game: 2.9
Aces: 5
Blocks: 1

Iowa
6'1" | Sophomore | OPP
7 Sets Played

Kills: 35
Kills/Game: 5
Digs: 15
Digs/Game: 2.14
Receptions: 16
Rcpt/Game: 2.29
Aces: 4
Blocks: 4

Kansas
5'10" | Senior | S
9 Sets Played

Assists: 105
Assists/Game: 11.67
Team Hitting%: 0.308
Digs: 25
Digs/Game: 2.78
Aces: 1
Blocks: 12

Kentucky
Ryle High School (Union, KY), 15 - 6
6'0" | Junior | OH/S
8 Sets Played

Kills: 47
Kills/Game: 5.88
Digs: 19
Digs/Game: 2.38
Receptions: 37
Rcpt/Game: 4.63
Aces: 2
Blocks: 7

Louisiana
5'9" | Senior
14 Sets Played

Kills: 89
Kills/Game: 6.36
Digs: 49
Digs/Game: 3.5
Receptions: 41
Rcpt/Game: 2.93
Aces: 13
Blocks: 2

Maryland
Junior | MB
6 Sets Played
Kills: 16
Kills/Game: 2.67
Digs: 4
Digs/Game: 0.67
Receptions: 14
Rcpt/Game: 2.33
Aces: 5
Blocks: 3

Massachusetts
6'1" | Senior | OH
8 Sets Played

Kills: 35
Kills/Game: 4.38
Digs: 14
Digs/Game: 1.75
Receptions: 21
Rcpt/Game: 2.63
Aces: 16
Blocks: 1

Michigan
6'0" | Junior | MH
19 Sets Played

Kills: 93
Kills/Game: 4.89
Digs: 12
Digs/Game: 0.63
Receptions: 1
Rcpt/Game: 5.3
Aces: 6
Blocks: 18

Minnesota
5'10" | Sophomore | S
6 Sets Played

Assists: 71
Assists/Game: 11.83
Team Hitting%: 0.341
Digs: 14
Digs/Game: 2.33
Aces: 2

Mississippi
5'11" | Junior | OH/RS
7 Sets Played

Kills: 46
Kills/Game: 6.57
Digs: 34
Digs/Game: 4.86
Receptions: 9
Rcpt/Game: 1.29
Blocks: 3

Missouri
6'1" | Senior
13 Sets Played
Kills: 85
Kills/Game: 6.54
Digs: 50
Digs/Game: 3.85
Receptions: 51
Rcpt/Game: 3.92
Aces: 2
Blocks: 4

Montana
5'9" | Senior | S/RS
7 Sets Played

Assists: 64
Assists/Game: 9.14
Team Hitting%: 0.190
Digs: 19
Digs/Game: 2.71
Aces: 5
Blocks: 3

Nebraska
5'11" | Senior | S
9 Sets Played

Assists: 103
Assists/Game: 11.44
Team Hitting%: 0.439
Digs: 24
Digs/Game: 2.67
Aces: 6
Blocks: 5

New Hampshire
Senior | OH
10 Sets Played

Kills: 26
Kills/Game: 2.6
Digs: 6
Digs/Game: 0.6
Receptions: 18
Rcpt/Game: 1.8
Aces: 10

North Carolina
5'10" | Senior | S
9 Sets Played
Assists: 78
Assists/Game: 8.67
Team Hitting%: 0.180
Digs: 29
Digs/Game: 3.22
Aces: 5
Blocks: 5

North Dakota
5'9" | Senior | S
4 Sets Played

Kills: 12
Kills/Game: 3
Digs: 7
Digs/Game: 1.75
Receptions:
Rcpt/Game:
Aces: 4
Blocks: 1

Ohio
6'0" | Senior | MH
7 Sets Played

Kills: 42
Kills/Game: 6
Digs: 25
Digs/Game: 3.57
Receptions: 24
Rcpt/Game: 3.43
Aces: 4
Blocks: 5

Oklahoma
Freshman | OH
11 Sets Played

Kills: 43
Kills/Game: 3.91
Digs: 12
Digs/Game: 1.09
Receptions: 5
Rcpt/Game: 0.46
Aces: 7
Blocks: 2

Pennsylvania
6'0" | Senior | S/OH
10 Sets Played

Kills: 67
Kills/Game: 6.7
Digs: 13
Digs/Game: 1.3
Receptions: 11
Rcpt/Game: 1.1
Aces: 6
Blocks: 4

South Carolina
5'11" | Sophomore | OH
8 Sets Played

Kills: 58
Kills/Game: 7.25
Digs: 21
Digs/Game: 2.63
Receptions: 14
Rcpt/Game: 1.75
Aces: 3
Blocks: 3

South Dakota
5'8" | Junior | OH
14 Sets Played

Kills: 91
Kills/Game: 6.5
Digs: 34
Digs/Game: 2.43
Receptions: 10
Rcpt/Game: 0.71
Aces: 11
Blocks: 4

Tennessee
5'8" | Senior | OH
11 Sets Playe
d
Kills: 48
Kills/Game: 4.36
Digs: 39
Digs/Game: 3.54
Receptions:
Rcpt/Game:
Aces: 8
Blocks: 3

Texas
5'11" | Senior | OH
12 Sets Played

Kills: 69
Kills/Game: 5.75
Digs: 42
Digs/Game: 3.5
Receptions: 28
Rcpt/Game: 2.33
Aces: 7
Blocks: 3

Utah
6'5" | Sophomore | OH/MB
12 Sets Played

Kills: 62
Kills/Game: 5.17
Digs: 11
Digs/Game: 0.92
Receptions: 22
Rcpt/Game: 1.83
Aces: 7
Blocks: 3

Virginia
5'7" | Junior | OH/DS
4 Sets Played

Kills: 45
Kills/Game: 11.25
Digs: 32
Digs/Game: 8
Aces: 8

West Virginia
5'9" | Sophomore | MH
Kills: 47
Kills/Game: 3.92
Digs: 28
Digs/Game: 2.33
Receptions: 37
Rcpt/Game: 3.08
Aces: 9
Blocks: 12

Wisconsin
5'10" | Sophomore | OH
12 Sets Played

Kills: 71
Kills/Game: 5.92
Digs: 40
Digs/Game: 3.33
Receptions: 30
Rcpt/Game: 2.5
Aces: 7
Blocks: 1

Wyoming
5'5" | Senior | S
10 Sets Played

Assists: 85
Assists/Game: 8.5
Team Hitting%: 0.178
Digs: 31
Digs/Game: 3.1
Aces: 1

About the MaxPreps/AVCA High School Player of the Week Program
The MaxPreps/AVCA High School Player of the Week Program is a partnership between the American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) and CBS MaxPreps, Inc. Each week MaxPreps and the AVCA recognize deserving student-athletes at the high school level who have demonstrated outstanding play on the court throughout the week of competition. Coaches must submit statistics to MaxPreps.com in order for their athletes to be considered for the program. To obtain your free access code to MaxPreps.com call (800) 329-7324 x1 or email [email protected] For more information on AVCA, check out the AVCA website at www.avca.org.
High school basketball: Top 50 Class of 2022 prospect Chance Westry leaves Sierra Canyon - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: Top 50 Class of 2022 prospect Chance Westry leaves Sierra Canyon
Despite starting the high school basketball season in Southern California with a perfect 7-0 mark, national power Sierra Canyon (Chatsworth) has suffered a number of significant personnel losses. At the top of the list is four-star guard Chance Westry, a Pennsylvania native who is returning home and no longer with the program due to personal reasons, head coach Andre Chevalier told the Los Angeles Daily News.

Regarded as the No. 34 overall prospect in the Class of 2022, Westry averaged 14.2 points per outing in five appearances this season. He did not play in Sierra Canyon's previous two contests.

Max Allen, a 6-foot-8 post player, left the team before the regular season officially got underway April 22.

Bronny James is also unlikely to join the lineup this year after tearing his meniscus in February and 7-foot-3 center Harold Yu, who lives in China, also will not join the team.

Top five Class of 2022 prospect Amari Bailey has carried the load offensively in recent games, scoring 35 points in a 70-54 victory over Windward last Tuesday before recording a triple-double with 32 points, 15 rebounds and 10 assists in their most recent win over Crossroads on Friday.

Despite the voids in the lineup, the Trailblazers have now won 59 consecutive league games and remain a strong contenders to capture their third consecutive CIF Southern Section Open Division title. Playoffs begin May 28.
Amari Bailey drives to the basket during his 35-point performance against Windward.
Photo by Nick Koza
Amari Bailey drives to the basket during his 35-point performance against Windward.
The Bolles School of Florida leads OFFICIAL Cup fall standings - OFFICIAL
The Bolles School of Florida leads MaxPreps Cup fall standings
While COVID-19 prevented 17 states from participating in high school sports this past fall, 33 others went ahead with athletic competition. Bolles (Jacksonville, Fla.) comes out on top as the best overall athletic program in the country for the dall season, according to the MaxPreps Cup rankings.

The MaxPreps Cup is an effort to rank the top high school athletic programs in the country. Points are awarded for state championships, state runner-up finishes and national rankings. Points are awarded based on popularity of sport, based on participation numbers, the size of the state, the size of schools in a playoff division and the number of teams participating in that playoff division.

Bolles won state championships in boys and girls swimming and girls cross country while grabbing runner-up finishes in football and boys cross country. With a total of 1,000 points, Bolles edges North Allegheny (Wexford, Pa.) (995) for the top spot in the nation. Due to its strong swimming program and cross country programs, Bolles has often finished near the top of the MaxPreps Cup rankings, 2020 marks the first time that it has finished at the top of the season rankings.

How the rest of the school year plays out will determine the final overall champion. The 17 states that did not field sports during the fall are making plans to have some sort of alternative fall season during the winter and spring months — along with the regular winter and spring sports. MaxPreps will have a Cup rankings update in March with final 2020-21 school rankings to post in July.
Bolles was the  Florida 4A football runner-up and leads the 2020-21 MaxPreps Cup standings after the fall season.
Photo by Annette Wilkerson
Bolles was the Florida 4A football runner-up and leads the 2020-21 MaxPreps Cup standings after the fall season.
MaxPreps Cup 2020-21 fall standings

1.    Bolles (Jacksonville, Fla.), 1,000
Fall state champions:
Boys swimming, girls swimming, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, football

2.    North Allegheny (Wexford, Pa.), 995
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls volleyball, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls cross country

3.    Boise (Idaho), 886
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, boys swimming, girls swimming, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls soccer, girls volleyball

4.    Century (Bismarck, N.D.), 872
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, boys cross country, girls swimming, girls volleyball, football

5.    Signal Mountain (Tenn.), 802
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, boys cross country, girls soccer, girls cross country

6.    Marist (Atlanta), 799
Fall state champions:
Football, girls volleyball, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

7.    Southlake Carroll (Southlake, Texas), 754
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country
Fall state runners-up: Football, girls cross country

8.    Carmel (Ind.), 747
Fall state champions:
Boys tennis, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

9.    Sioux Falls Christian (Sioux Falls, S.D.), 741
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, boys soccer, boys cross country, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Girls cross country

10.  Brentwood (Tenn.), 735
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Football


11.  American Heritage (Plantation, Fla.), 725
Fall state champions:
Football, girls golf
Fall state runners-up: boys golf

12.  Sugar-Salem (Sugar City, Idaho), 687
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, football, girls volleyball, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls soccer

13.  Greenwood (Ark.), 658
Fall state champions:
Football, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Girls cross country, girls golf

14.  Skutt Catholic (Omaha, Neb.), 651
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls softball, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Boys tennis

14.  Champlain Valley Union (Hinesburg, Vt.), 651
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, boys cross country, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls field hockey girls golf, girls soccer

16.  Auburn (Ala.), 647
Fall state champions:
Girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, football, boys swimming

17.  Oviedo (Fla.), 645
Fall state champions:
Boys swimming, girls bowling
Fall state runners-up: Girls swimming

18.  Archbishop Hoban (Akron, Ohio), 640
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, football

19.  La Salle Academy (Providence, R.I.), 635
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls soccer, girls tennis, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls field hockey

20.  ED White (Jacksonville, Fla.), 632
Fall state champions:
Boys swimming, boys cross country, girls swimming, girls cross country


21.  Lone Peak (Highland, Utah), 631
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, girls volleyball, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Football, girls tennis

22.  Pioneer (Ann Arbor, Mich.), 625
Fall state champions:
Girls swimming, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys tennis

23.  Cherry Creek (Greenwood Village, Colo.), 618
Fall state champions:
Boys tennis, football, girls cross country

24.  Manhattan Christian (Manhattan, Mont.), 617
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, football, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls volleyball

25.  Laurel (Mont.), 612
Fall state champions:
Football, girls golf, girls soccer, girls cross country

26.  Catholic-B.R. (Baton Rouge, La.), 598
Fall state champions:
Boys swimming, boys cross country, football

27.  Aquinas (Overland Park, Kan.), 595
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball, boys cross country, boys soccer

28.  Unionville (Kennett Square, Pa.), 590
Fall state champions:
Girls golf
Fall state runners-up: Boys golf, girls volleyball

28.  MICDS (St. Louis), 590
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer
Fall state runners-up: Boys swimming, football

30.  Westminster (Atlanta), 588
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls volleyball, girls cross country


31.  Oak Hall (Gainesville, Fla.), 570
Fall state champions:
Girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, football

32.  Mars (Pa.), 570
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, girls soccer

33.  McCallie (Chattanooga, Tenn.), 569
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, football
Fall state runners-up: Boys golf

34.  Greensburg Central Catholic (Greensburg, Pa.), 565
Fall state runners-up:
Boys soccer, girls soccer, girls golf

34.  Cranbrook Kingswood (Bloomfield Hills, Mich.), 565
Fall state champions:
Boys tennis, girls swimming

36.  Pope (Marietta, Ga.), 554
Fall state champions:
Girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls softball, girls volleyball

37.  Lincoln (Sioux Falls, S.D.), 553
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, boys cross country, girls tennis
Fall state runners-up: Girls cross country

38.  Marquette University (Milwaukee, Wis.), 550
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer
Fall state runners-up: Boys volleyball, boys cross country

39.  St. Ignatius (Cleveland), 545
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer
Fall state runners-up: Boys golf

40.  Chaparral (Scottsdale, Ariz.), 542
Fall state champions:
Boys swimming, football, girls swimming


41.  Mountain Brook (Birmingham, Ala.), 538
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, girls cross country

42.  Trinity (Louisville, Ky.), 534
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, football

42.  Bentonville (Ark.), 534
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls cross country, boys golf

44.  Jackson Hole (Jackson, Wyo.), 533
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys golf, football, girls golf

45.  Jackson (Jackson, Mo.), 530
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, football

45.  Kirtland (Ohio), 530
Fall state champions:
Football, girls soccer

45.  Huntsville (Ala.), 530
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls swimming, boys swimming

45.  DeWitt (Mich.), 530
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, football

49.  Hilton Head (Hilton Head Island, S.C.), 529
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Boys swimming, girls swimming, girls cross country

50.  Ponte Vedra (Ponte Vedra, Fla.), 528
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, girls volleyball


51.  Morgan (Utah), 526
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, girls soccer, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Football, girls volleyball

52.  Baylor (Chattanooga, Tenn.), 523
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, girls golf
Fall state runners-up: Girls volleyball

53.  Father Ryan (Nashville, Tenn.), 520
Fall state champions:
Girls soccer
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, girls cross country

54.  St. Xavier (Cincinnati), 519
Fall state champions:
Football
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

54.  Rocky Mountain (Meridian, Idaho), 519
Fall state champions:
Football, girls soccer
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

56.  Buford (Ga.), 516
Fall state champions:
Football, girls volleyball

57.  Sentinel (Missoula, Mont.), 512
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, football, boys cross country

57.  O'Gorman (Sioux Falls, S.D.), 512
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, girls volleyball, girls cross country

59.  Wando (Mt. Pleasant, S.C.), 511
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball, girls swimming
Fall state runners-up: Boys swimming

59.  St. Joseph's Academy (Baton Rouge, La.), 511
Fall state champions:
Girls swimming, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls volleyball


61.  Southern Columbia Area (Catawissa, Pa.), 510
Fall state champions:
Football, girls soccer

62.  Lewisburg (Pa.), 508
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, boys cross country

62.  East Greenwich (R.I.), 508
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, girls field hockey, girls soccer, girls cross country

64.  Cathedral Prep (Erie, Pa.), 505
Fall state champions:
Boys golf
Fall state runners-up: Football

65.  Niwot (Colo.), 504
Fall state champions:
Boys tennis, boys cross country, girls cross country

66.  Pace Academy (Atlanta), 503
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

67.  Hamilton (Chandler, Ariz.), 495
Fall state champions:
Boys golf, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Football

68.  Bishop Miege (Shawnee Mission, Kan.), 493
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

69.  Lenawee Christian (Adrian, Mich.), 490
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, football

70.  New Bremen (Ohio), 485
Fall state champions:
Football
Fall state runners-up: Girls volleyball


71.  St. Xavier (Louisville, Ky.), 484
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, boys cross country

72.  Southside Christian (Simpsonville, S.C.), 475
Fall state champions:
Football, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

72.  New Albany (Ohio), 475
Fall state champions:
Girls golf
Fall state runners-up: Boys soccer

74.  Eastside (Taylors, S.C.), 474
Fall state champions:
Boys swimming, boys cross country, girls swimming

75.  Merrol Hyde Magnet (Hendersonville, Tenn.), 473
Fall state runners-up:
Boys cross country, girls cross country, girls soccer

76.  Chiles (Tallahassee, Fla.), 470
Fall state champions:
Boys golf
Fall state runners-up: Girls swimming

77.  Cathedral (Indianapolis), 469
Fall state champions:
Football
Fall state runners-up: Girls soccer

78.  St. Thomas More (Lafayette, La.), 468
Fall state champions:
Football
Fall state runners-up: Girls swimming, girls volleyball

79.  Maryville (Mo.), 465
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Football

80.  Cardinal Gibbons (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), 461
Fall state champions:
Football
Fall state runners-up: Girls volleyball


81.  Fort Wayne Bishop Dwenger (Fort Wayne, Ind.), 460
Fall state champions:
Girls soccer, girls volleyball

82.  Fairmont Senior (Fairmont, W. Va.), 452
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, girls soccer

82.  Ankeny (Iowa), 452
Fall state champions:
Football, girls volleyball

84.  Windham (N.H.), 450
Fall state champions:
Boys soccer, girls field hockey
Fall state runners-up: Girls soccer, boys cross country

85.  Holy Innocents Episcopal (Atlanta), 448
Fall state champions:
Girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, girls cross country

86.  Grapevine (Texas), 445
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls cross country

86.  Boerne-Champion (Boerne, Texas), 445
Fall state champions:
Girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country

88.  Ravenwood (Brentwood, Tenn.), 441
Fall state champions:
Girls soccer
Fall state runners-up: Boys golf

89.  Sacred Heart (Louisville, Ky.), 438
Fall state champions:
Girls field hockey, girls soccer

89.  Lovett (Atlanta), 438
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country
Fall state runners-up: Girls softball, girls cross country


91.  Salpointe Catholic (Tucson, Ariz.), 434
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls cross country, girls volleyball

91.  Harding Academy (Searcy, Ark.), 434
Fall state champions:
Football
Fall state runners-up: Boys cross country, boys golf

93.  Metairie Park Country Day (Metairie, La.), 431
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls volleyball
Fall state runners-up: Girls cross country

94.  Montague (Mich.), 430
Fall state champions:
Girls golf, football

94.  Burroughs (St. Louis), 430
Fall state champions:
Girls tennis, girls cross country

96. Creekside (St. Johns, Fla.), 425
Fall state champions:
Girls swimming
Fall state runners-up: Boys swimming

97. Cody (Wyo.), 422
Fall state champions:
Football, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys golf, girls swimming

98. Bishop England (Charleston, S.C.), 419
Fall state champions:
Boys cross country, girls tennis
Fall state runners-up: Boys swimming

98. Bozeman (Mont.), 419
Fall state champions:
Girls golf, girls cross country
Fall state runners-up: Boys soccer

100. Cheyenne Mountain (Colorado Springs, Colo.), 414
Fall state champions:
Boys golf
Fall state runners-up: Boys tennis, boys cross country
NFL Draft: 10 players who could've been first-round picks out of high school - OFFICIAL
NFL Draft: 10 players who could've been first-round picks out of high school
The NFL Draft is set for tonight in Cleveland, Ohio, with 32 NFL teams prepared to choose from among the nation's best college players. But what if they were able to choose high school players?

Baseball, hockey and basketball professional leagues have all drafted players right out of high school while the NFL requires a player to be three years removed from his graduating class. Opponents of drafting players out of high school into the NFL site maturity level, physical strength and quickness and knowledge of the game as reasons why prep players just aren't ready.

However, there are always those precocious players mature beyond their years who possess the size, strength and speed to compete at the professional level. The emergence of Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence as a "once-in-a-generation talent" leads those to wonder if Lawrence might have been a first-round pick right out of high school.

MaxPreps takes a look at 10 players, including Lawrence, who were "once-in-a-generation talents" in their own day. Not all of them succeeded in the NFL while others have gone on to be Hall of Famers. The argument here is that all 10 were phenoms coming out of high school and highly likely that some NFL general manager would have been willing to take a first-round gamble on their potential.
Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe
File photo by Ron McCann
Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe
10 NFL-ready players out of high school

Trevor Lawrence, Cartersville (Ga.), 2017
Resume:
The presumptive first pick in this year's draft has been the nation's most coveted quarterback since his freshman year at Cartersville. The No. 1 ranked quarterback in his class throughout his high school career, he's been labeled by some scouts as the greatest quarterback prospect of all-time, along with Hall of Famer John Elway. He became a starter early in his freshman season at Clemson and led the Tigers to a national championship.
Why he would be drafted: At 6-foot-6 and and 208 pounds, Lawrence definitely had the size that NFL scouts like to see in a quarterback. However, he also has arm strength, quickness, maneuverability in the pocket, and passing instincts that make him a once in a generation playcaller.

Herschel Walker, Johnson County (Wrightsville, Ga.), 1979
Resume:
He was the biggest thing to ever happen in Wrightsville (Ga.) in 1979. Colleges from all over the country came to the small town of 2,000 people to watch Walker practice. He rushed for 3,167 yards and 45 touchdowns as a senior, a rushing record that lasted for 21 years. He was a Heisman Trophy candidate as a true freshman after rushing for 1,616 yards. He left Georgia after his junior year to play football in the USFL and eventually played 12 seasons in the NFL.
Why would he be drafted: Very few running backs coming out of high school have ever had the total package that Walker presented. At 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, he was big for a halfback. However, he was also the fastest player on the field — he won the 100 and 200-yard dashes at the state meet — and one of the strongest, he was a state shot put champion as well.

Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe (Rock Hill, S.C.), 2011
Resume:
The No. 1 overall pick in the 2014 NFL draft, Clowney had strong credentials as a edge rusher coming out of high school. He had 69.5 sacks in his three years on the varsity, including 29.5 as a senior when he was regarded as the nation's No. 1 overall recruit regardless of position. He was a two-time All-American in college at South Carolina, starting as a freshman and essentially recognized as college football's best defensive player by his sophomore season. He's a three-time Pro Bowler in the NFL.
Why would he be drafted: Clowney was not only viewed as the top player in the class of 2014, but that he would have been the top player in many other classes as well. At 6-5, 250 pounds, he'd already developed into a player capable of playing at a much higher level.

Adrian Peterson, Palestine (Texas), 2003
Resume:
One of the more recent players who could have made the jump, Peterson was the national player of the year while running for 2,950 yards as a senior in 2003. The following year as a true freshman, Peterson finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting after rushing for 1,925 yards. He has since gone on to become the fifth all-time leading rusher in NFL history.
Why would he be drafted: Peterson has given several interviews to ESPN, noting that he felt he was capable of making the jump from high school to the pros. According to an article by Len Pasquarelli in 2007, Peterson is often named by talent evaluators as the player who most capable of making the jump.

Marcus Dupree, Philadelphia (Miss.), 1981
Resume:
The most prized high school prospect in the nation in 1981, Dupree scored on his very first possession as a freshman and finished his career with 87 touchdowns. When he arrived on campus at Oklahoma, head coach Barry Switzer reportedly said, "He was the best player on the field ... physically ready, as a true freshman, to be the best player on a great college team. Maybe even ready for the NFL at that age." Dupree came through as a freshman, rushing for 1,144 yards and earning second team All-America honors. However, he left Oklahoma after his freshman year and ended up playing the USFL at the age of 19. After a brief stint with the Los Angeles Rams, Dupree was out of the NFL due to injuries.
Why would he be drafted: Dupree was 210 pounds as a freshman in high school, eventually growing to 235 pounds. He also had sprinter speed, reportedly posting a 4.29 40-yard dash.

Andy Katzenmoyer, Westerville South (Westerville, Ohio), 1995
Resume:
A 6-foot-5, 240-pound linebacker in high school, Katzenmoyer devastated opponents with his speed and instincts. He was named the best player, not just linebacker, in the Detroit Free Press's Best in the Midwest rankings. USA Today named him National Defensive Player of the Year. He was Mr. Football in Ohio. He was also the top linebacker on the Parade Magazine All-America team. As a true freshman at Ohio State, he beat out a Butkus Award finalist from the year before, Greg Bellisari, at middle linebacker and set school records for sacks and tackles for loss while earning All-Big Ten honors. Ohio State had the nation's top passing defense with Katzenmoyer leading the way.
Why would he be drafted: Speed, instinct and tackling ability were Katzenmoyer's trademarks (his coach at Westerville South held him out of tackling drills to prevent other players from getting hurt, according to the Detroit Free Press). A neck injury as a rookie brought a premature end to his career.

Cookie Gilchrist, Har-Brack (Natrona Heights, Pa.), 1953
Resume:
Gilchrist was the top player in Pennsylvania in 1953. Just a junior, Gilchrist was one of the leading scorers in the state with 184 points on 24 touchdowns and 42 extra points. He earned all-state honors, receiving the most votes on the team. The problem for Gilchrist, however, is that he was ineligible to play as a senior. WPIAL rules prevented any senior who turned 19 prior to Sept. 1 from playing. Gilchrist turned 19 in May of his junior year. Fortune found Gilchrist in the form of Cleveland Browns coach Paul Brown, who signed Gilchrist to a contract. However a disagreement led to Gilchrist leaving the Browns. He did play in the Ontario Rugby Union (a precursor to the Canadian Football League) as a 19-year-old. He later played in the AFL and was the AFL MVP in 1962.
Why would he be drafted: Obviously talented enough to gain the attention of Paul Brown, who had coached the Browns to an 11-1 record and a runner-up finish to Detroit in the NFL championship game.

Orlando Pace, Sandusky (Ohio), 1993
Resume:
Pace was bigger than most professional offensive linemen when he was still in high school. At 6-foot-8, 320 pounds, Pace was the state lineman of the year as a senior while also earning All-America honors. He became one of just two Buckeyes to ever start as a true freshmen. He is the only two-time winner of the Lombardi Award, winning it as a 20-year old sophomore. He's in the NFL and College Halls of Fame.
Why would he be drafted: Size alone would have made Pace a tempting pick. He's one of the largest players ever selected to the Hall of Fame. However, he was also characterized as being very athletic for a player his size. It was those attributes that made him the No. 1 overall pick in the 1997 NFL Draft.

Bill Fralic, Penn Hills (Pittsburgh, Pa.), 1980
Resume:
A four-year starter at Penn Hills, Fralic helped his team win three WPIAL championships. As a senior, he earned the Dial National Athlete of the Year Award, which had been given the previous year to Herschel Walker. A two-way lineman, Fralic had 15 sacks as a senior, but he found his way into the starting lineup at Pittsburgh as a college freshman. He eventually earned consensus All-America honors twice and was twice a top 10 finisher in the Heisman Trophy voting. He was a four-time Pro Bowl player in the NFL with the Falcons.
Why would he be drafted: Fralic's versatility would have been a huge bonus as he was able to play on both the offensive and defensive lines as well as tight end. He dominated high school opponents with his quickness and strength.

Bronko Nagurski, Bemidji (Minn.), 1926
Resume:
More legendary stories have been told about Nagurski than probably any NFL player in history. Noted for his incredible strength, speed and agility, Nagurski was a powerful runner on offense, but also strong enough to play offensive tackle. He ran the 100-yard dash in 10.2 seconds and reportedly had a 19.5 inch ring size — the largest of any NFL Hall of Fame member. He reportedly could have played any position on the field during the 1930s, including quarterback. He threw several touchdown passes in leading the Bears to two world championships.
Why would he be drafted: At 6-2, 220 pounds, Nagurski was bigger than over half of the linemen on the Chicago Bears when he joined them. His natural strength made him such a valuable player at the University of Minnesota and later with the Bears.
High school baseball: Teams with the most state championships - OFFICIAL
High school baseball: Teams with the most state championships
It's been 34 seasons since Tucson won an Arizona state baseball championship, and the Badgers have won only won four since 1957. Yet, Tucson has heads MaxPreps list of teams with the most high school baseball championships.

The Badgers won their first state title in 1912, but the greatest stretch of sustained excellence for Tucson came between 1939 and 1956. During that 18-year period, Tucson won 15 state crowns, including eight in a row from 1939 to 1946. The greatest Tucson team, however, might be the 1972 team that went 25-0. Tucson has rebounded to appear in the Class 5A state finals in 2018 and 2019, finishing as the runner-up each time.

Woodrow Wilson (Washington, D.C.) is closing in on Tucson and might have tied the Badgers by now if not for COVID. Wilson has won every DCIAA championship since 1993 and it would have been the favorite in 2020 and 2021. Wilson plays in an association with just 15 schools.

Asher (Okla.) is one of three schools tied with 22 state championships. That total is actually a bit misleading since Asher has won a total of 45 baseball championships. However only 22 of them have come in the spring. With no football program, Asher also plays baseball in the fall and has racked up 23 championships during that season as well.

Other teams with 22 championships include Bishop Hendricken (Warwick, R.I.) and Jackson Prep (Miss.).

The championships listed are based on information found on state association websites. Not all state websites had complete lists of past champions. MaxPreps also included independent and private school championships, including TAPPS in Texas, the MAIS in Mississippi and the NCISAA in North Carolina.

Past champion lists were unavailable for AISA in Alabama, the SCISA in South Carolina and the VISAA in Virginia. California is not included because it does not hold state championships in baseball (although a few championships seasons were held in the 1920s.). The Inter-AC in Pennsylvania is also not included, although Penn Charter holds the record there with 46 championships dating back to the late 1800s. Corrections or additions, please contact Kevin Askeland at [email protected]
Bingham celebrates its 2013 Utah state title, one of 21 won by the school.
File photo by Christian Wininger
Bingham celebrates its 2013 Utah state title, one of 21 won by the school.
Schools with most baseball state titles

1.   29 — Tucson High Magnet School (Tucson, Ariz.)
2.   27 — Wilson (Washington, D.C.)
3.   22 — Asher (Okla.)
3.   22 — Bishop Hendricken (Warwick, R.I.)
3.   22 — Jackson Prep (Jackson, Miss.)
6.   21 — Bingham (South Jordan, Utah)
7.   20 — Gloucester Catholic (Gloucester City, N.J.)
7.   20 — Jesuit (New Orleans, La.)
7.   20 — Norway (Iowa), closed 1991, now Benton (Van Horne, Iowa)
10. 19 — DeSales (Walla Walla, Wash.)
10. 19 — St. Mary's-Colgan (Pittsburg, Kan.)
12. 17 — Eunice (N.M.)
12. 17 — Northfield (Vt.)
14. 16 — Long (Skipperville, Ala.)
14. 16 — St. David (Ariz.)
16. 15 — Bamberg-Ehrhardt (Bamberg, S.C.)
16. 15 — Charlotte Christian (Charlotte, N.C.)
16. 15 — Silver Lake (Kan.)
19. 14 — Bangor (Maine)
19. 14 — Farmington (N.M.)
19. 14 — Proctor (Vt.)
19. 14 — Punahou (Honolulu)
19. 14 — St. Mark's (Wilmington, Del.)
24. 13 — Christian Brothers (Memphis, Tenn.)
24. 13 — Hicks (Leesville, La.)
24. 13 — Owasso (Okla.)
24. 13 — West Lauderdale (Collinsville, Miss.)
24. 13 — Winooski (Vt.)

12 state championships
Assumption (Davenport, Iowa)
Burlington (Vt.)
Creighton Prep (Omaha, Neb.)
Deering (Portland, Maine)
Elder (Cincinnati)
Jefferson (Shenandoah Junction, W. Va.)
Lewiston (Idaho)
Nashua South (Nashua, N.H.)
Pitkin (La.)
Portsmouth (N.H.)

11 state championships
Bishop Ward (Kansas City, Kan.)
Byng (Ada, Okla.)
Carlsbad (N.M.)
Cretin-Derham Hall (St. Paul, Minn.)
Dale (Okla.)
Davenport Central (Davenport, Iowa)
Eaton (Colo.)
Enterprise (Utah)
Kee (Lansing, Iowa)
Key West (Fla.)
Oak Grove (Hattiesburg, Miss.)
Tottenville (Staten Island, N.Y.)
St. Pius X (Albuquerque)
Waterford (Conn.)
Westminster Christian (Miami)

10 state championships
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Arundel (Gambrills, Md.)
Barbe (Lake Charles, La.)
Bishop England (Charleston, S.C.)
Brattleboro (Vt.)
Cape Elizabeth (Maine)
Churchill County (Fallon, Nev.)
Farragut (Knoxville, Tenn.)
Gastonia (N.C.)
Lincoln County (Panaca, Nev.)
Parkview Baptist (Baton Rouge, La.)
Pine Bluff (Ark.)
Poly Prep Country Day (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
Revere (Ovid, Colo.)
St. Paul (Shiner, Texas)
Silo (Okla.)
Sweet Water (Ala.)
Taylorsville (Utah)