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California high school sports: State officials, CIF, coaches find common ground, talks to resume next week - HIGHSCORE
California high school sports: State officials, CIF, coaches find common ground, talks to resume next week
When seven people meet on a Zoom call for the first time, to largely make decisions concerning more than 3 million young athletes, it’s good to start with some commonality.

The seven who met Thursday afternoon to discuss the return of youth sports in California got to that space early in the 62-minute call, said Serra (San Mateo, Calif.) football coach Patrick Walsh, and it led to what he called a “progressive, positive and open” dialogue.

Walsh, one of three coaches, California Interscholastic Federation Executive Director Ron Nocetti, Let Them Play co-founder Brad Hensley, and two Gov. Gavin Newsom staffers — Dr. Mark Ghaly and Jim DeBoo — planned to meet again early next week to continue talks on how to return youth and high school sports back safely and swiftly.

“There were a lot of similarities between every man on that call,” said Walsh, the organizer of the 700-member Golden State High School Football Coaches Community. “All of us have kids, all of them play sports and all of us care about sports. How do we all get to the same point in an expeditious way? The phone call did not impede that conversation.

“I felt like the aura of the call was positive. The spirit of the kids were in that room and on the call. Hopefully we can advance the ball down the field knowing that we can’t do this forever because at some point we’re going to run out of time."
Patrick Walsh (right) leads his Serra Padres into the 2019 CIF State Division 1-AA championship game against Corona del Mar.
File photo by Ming Chung
Patrick Walsh (right) leads his Serra Padres into the 2019 CIF State Division 1-AA championship game against Corona del Mar.
Part of the positive feeling came from improving COVID-19 test results throughout the state.

That led Newsom to lift mandatory at-home orders on Jan. 25, which opened high school play this week for sports slotted in the purple tier: cross country, golf, tennis, swimming and diving and cross country.

Other contact or indoor sports, such as football, volleyball and basketball, are running out of time. Lifting or altering the current tier California system would go a long way to getting other sports started and finished by the end of the school year.

On Tuesday, the National Federation of State High School Associations, the national governing body of prep sports, revised its May guidance document on the risk of COVID-19 during high school athletics, highlighted by the elimination of tiers assigned to specific sports.

NFHS REVISES COVID-19 GUIDANCE: Complete NFHS guidance

"That was awesome timing for us," De La Salle (Concord) football coach Justin Alumbaugh said. "It's not like we were saying 'we told you so.' It just supports what we've been saying and what people have been telling us. To get that information confirmed from a major institution like the NFHS was awesome."

Discussions of the tiers were mentioned Thursday, but more details will come next week Walsh said. The coaches group, which also includes Ron Gladnick, of Torrey Pines (San Diego), had met twice earlier with DeBoo, Newsom's top aide, but this was the first time they had met Ghaly, the state's Secretary of Health.

"I really liked his demeanor," Walsh said. "He's very pleasant, very thoughtful. I enjoyed the opportunity to meet the man."

Alumbaugh and Walsh said Ghaly was very receptive to the data that the Golden State and Let Them Play groups have supplied over the last three weeks, and encouraged more. Ghaly and DeBoo asked many questions, according to Alumbaugh and Walsh.

"Dr. Ghaly is a very bright man, no doubt about that," Alumbaugh said. "He understands what's going on. He's definitely aware of all the dynamics — the science, the data, statistics. He's far more of an expert that we are.

"The meeting was cooperative. It was positive. We're just trying to push the dialogue forward and they are too. Let's get this done."

Said Walsh: "I think everyone would love to come out with an announcement right now, but I did not anticipate that happening today, particularly since it was the first time we've had the opportunity to talk with Dr. Ghaly. It was a very good dialogue and discussion both ways. We're excited about setting a pathway forward."

So is Nocetti.

"Since the COVID-19 numbers have been trending in a better direction we definitely have had more frequent meetings with the California Department of Public Health and the governor's office," he said. "We feel those meetings are progressing toward a pathway to return. And we're going to continue to have those meetings."

Nocetti heads the organization that governs high school sports in the state and serves more than 800,000 athletes annually. Until this week, all California high school sports had been paused since April 3 due to the pandemic. It is one of 17 states that didn't play football in the traditional fall season.

The CIF has maintained that football's end date this spring can go as late as May 1, though some of the state's 10 sections have adopted an April 17 end date in order to prepare for the 2021 fall football season.

An earlier end date means the pressure is on to get the season going sooner. Walsh and Alumbaugh are hoping sections will be more flexible.

"You go from the end date and work backwards," Walsh said. "If we can start sometime in early March that gives us 5-8 games. I think all reasonable players and coaches would be happy with that.

"It's important that both sides know the hard ends and realize that we don't have a lot of time. Do we have some time? Yes. Do we have a lot of time? No."

Thursday's meeting came a day after Newsom addressed youth sports during a press conference at the Oakland Coliseum.

Among the topics included physical and mental health, the guidelines, football, data and even a lawsuit filed last week from two San Diego High School football players seeking an "immediate resumption of play."

In a stirring 32-minute press conference put on by the two advocacy groups on Friday, Gladnick had pleaded with Newsom to "help and engage with us," and to "work together."

Walsh said after hearing Newsom's remarks on Wednesday that he was more encouraged than ever that engagement is taking place. That was backed up with Thursday's meeting.

"I could tell he has put thought into youth sports in California and that's a great step in the right direction," Walsh said. "As we know, Gov. Newsom believes in sports and knows how much youth sports builds character, camaraderie, and self esteem.

"We are hopeful that the Governor will continue to look at the data and science presented to him and re-open the state for youth sports soon."

Here is what Newsom said Wednesday in its entirety about youth sports:

"Last week we made an announcement and that allowed for youth sports like track and field to take place. It's just the levels that we are and have provided a framework to allow certain youth sports to take shape in competition.

"That said, we have been in very direct conversations. Personally, I launched those conversations last week. My team is in constant contact, trying to work through these different tiers.

"The red tier, you'll start to see baseball. In subsequent tiers, we'll get to football. But I'll be honest with you, a lot of this is driven by football and folks wanting to get a football season in. And I am deeply sensitive to that.

"As I said, I not only have four kids who want to be educated, but they love sports. So I recognize all of the benefits — physical and mental — as well as the benefits to teachers and parents who have kids who are engaged in physical activities in terms of our responsibility to support those children as well. We want to see this happen.

"We want to do it safely and a lot of great data has been provided by the same groups that are suing us. If I was concerned about lawsuits, I would have collapsed a year ago. We receive dozens of them every week. And some of them are from folks who are very close to us. It's clarifying. It allows for focus. Some are specious, political. Others like this I think are quite legitimate in terms of what they ultimately want to achieve.

"I share that and we are processing that. I am very hopeful, very hopeful — I really mean this — I am very, very hopeful that we can find a compromise here and I believe that's possible as long as these case rates continue to move in the direction they're moving."
2020 MLB Draft recap: High school players get late start, 11 chosen - HIGHSCORE
2020 MLB Draft recap: High school players get late start, 11 chosen
Video: Fictional high schools seen via Google Earth
Take a tour of these cinematic prep palaces.

It took awhile for high school players to come off the board in the 2020 Major League Baseball draft, but they had a strong finish in the first round with a few surprises along the way. The draft's first day say 11 prep players chosen (with two more taken in the competitive-balance round).

The truncated MLB Draft continues on Thursday with Rounds 2-5.
Pete Crow-Armstrong, Harvard-Westlake
Photo by Terry Jack
Pete Crow-Armstrong, Harvard-Westlake
Robert Hassell III of Independence (Thompson's Station, Tenn.) was the first high school player chosen with the No. 8 overall pick by the San Diego Padres. The eighth-overall selection is the lowest the first high school player has been chosen in the 56 years of the MLB Draft.

The previous lowest selection was Clayton Kershaw of Highland Park (Dallas) at No. 7 overall in 2006. Three times, the first prep chosen was at No. 6, including 1992 when Derek Jeter of Kalamazoo Central (Mich.) was taken by the Yankees.

Overall, a high school player has been chosen with the No. 1 overall pick 25 times.

Outfielders Favorite Choice

The first three high school players chosen were all outfielders. After Hassell III went to San Diego at No. 8, Zac Veen of Spruce Creek (Port Orange, Fla.) went to the Rockies at No. 9.

Three picks later, the Reds chose Austin Hendrick of West Allegheny (Imperial, Pa.) at No. 12. Pete Crow-Armstrong of Harvard-Westlake (Studio City, Calif.) became the fourth prep outfielder chosen when the Mets picked him at No. 19.

Red Sox make surprise pick

Boston made the surprise pick of the first round when it chose second baseman Nick Yorke of Archbishop Mitty (San Jose, Calif.) at No. 17.

The selection was a shocker for several reasons. First, second basemen rarely come off the draft board in the first round. Second, Yorke was ranked by MLB as the No. 139 best player available in the draft. The second-lowest ranked prep player chosen in the first round was Carson Tucker, a shortstop from Mountain Pointe (Phoenix), who was ranked No. 52.

The Red Sox have had good luck with Northern California second basemen, however. Former league MVP Dustin Pedroia is originally from Woodland.

Few pitchers chosen

In the past, high school pitchers have been a popular first-round choice. Not so in 2020. Mick Abel of Jesuit (Portland, Ore.) went to the Phillies at No. 15 while Nick Bitsko of Central Bucks East (Doylestown, Pa.) went to the Rays at No. 24.

Among those pitchers not taken Wednesday included potential first round picks Jared Kelley of Refugio (Texas) and Carson Montgomery of Windermere (Fla.).

Only three prep pitchers were chosen in the first round last year with seven chosen in the 2018 draft.

Draft beats last year's numbers

The 2019 draft had one of the lowest total of high school players taken in over a decade with just 10 players chosen. The 2020 draft did one better with 11 players chosen. An additional two players were chosen in the competitive-balance round making 13 preps chosen out of 37 total picks on the draft's first day.

Extending the Season: No Sierra Canyon-Sheldon trilogy, but three fantastic finishes - HIGHSCORE
Extending the Season: No Sierra Canyon-Sheldon trilogy, but three fantastic finishes
Video: Sierra Canyon wins at buzzer
Trailblazers advance to state in dramatic fashion.

The lights at Golden 1 Center, home of the Sacramento Kings, have never shined so bright for a high school event.
 
In each of the past two seasons, the star-studded boys basketball team from Sierra Canyon (Chatsworth, Calif.) played against hometown Sheldon (Sacramento). The energy and excitement was palpable for the games that capped the CIF's 12-game state basketball championships.

The Trailblazers brought an entourage that included former NBA players and Hollywood celebrities, who sat courtside for all to see.

They are high school basketball's version of the Showtime Lakers.

The hometown fans walked away disappointed each of the past two seasons as the flashy visitors showed more than just a little glitz — Sierra Canyon won each game handily, 76-52 and 75-62. But Huskies were hopeful that with a strong cast returning, including Marcus Bagley, younger brother of Kings' star Marvin Bagley, they would return in 2020 to flip those results.

The Huskies and Trailblazers appeared on a collision course before the coronavirus pandemic struck the country full force last week.

Sierra Canyon, featuring 5-star prospects in Ziaire Williams, Brandon Boston Jr. and Amari Bailey, plus the sons of LeBron James (Bronny James) and Dwyane Wade (Zaire Wade), captured its third straight Southern California regional title in the most dramatic way possible.
This buzzer beater by Ziaire Williams against Etiwanda would turn out to be the last shot of the season for Sierra Canyon.
Photo by Louis Lopez
This buzzer beater by Ziaire Williams against Etiwanda would turn out to be the last shot of the season for Sierra Canyon.
The Trailblazers pulled off a 63-61 stunner over Etiwanda as Williams, a McDonald's All-American, finished off a 13-0 run to close the game with a fade-away, 17-foot swish at the buzzer to set off a wild celebration.

"It was truly surreal," Sierra Canyon coach Andre Chevalier said a week after the shot. "How magical was it for us to just fight all the way back from that seemingly endless hole? And then to win it on that shot by Ziaire. Truly surreal."

Sheldon's path to the Northern California finals was similarly unlikely — perhaps even more so.

One week before the finals, the plug was pulled on the Huskies' season after a student in Sheldon's district was quarantined as a precaution for coronavirus.

Two days of public outcry and political pressure led to top-seeded Sheldon being reinstated, but the Huskies found themselves down eight late on the road in the semifinals against a very determined Dublin squad.

Yet, they fought back to win 65-64, powered by Bagley's 27 points that included an improbable go-ahead shot with 17.5 seconds remaining.

"I'm proud of all of our guys, our team," Bagley told Joe Davidson of the Sacramento Bee. "I'm happy. We've been resilient all year. Learned a lot about our team. We're built for this. That's why this game meant so much."

That win vaulted Sheldon in the semifinals against another team built on great resolve, the Bishop O'Dowd (Oakland) Dragons. Winners of 18 straight games after a 5-7 start, O'Dowd looked capable of derailing the Sierra Canyon-Sheldon trilogy.

The Dragons had one the top freshman in the country, 6-foot-8 14-year-old forward Jalen Lewis, one of the state's top juniors in Marsalis Roberson and Cal signee Monty Bowser, as well as their own motivation.

It was five years ago that Ivan Rabb sank a game-winning free throw with less than a second to play to shock Mater Dei (Santa Ana) in the state final. A book "Dragon Hoops," was supposed to be released on the anniversary of that game, and O'Dowd was bent on repeating the feat.

It would have been a tall order, but O'Dowd was at the top of its game after a decisive 13-point road win over second seed Archbishop Mitty in the NorCal semifinals.

"As far as I'm concerned, this is our last game," O'Dowd coach Lou Richie said after the game. "Tomorrow is not promised."

Turned out, Richie called it.

The morning of the delayed O'Dowd-Sheldon NorCal finals on March 12, CIF Executive Director Ron Nocetti canceled that game and the weekend's 2020 state championship games.

"While we understand this decision is disappointing, we strongly believe that the opportunity to compete in this event does not outweigh our obligation to place the health and safety of our member schools and school communities above all else," he said.

No Sheldon-Sierra Canyon trilogy. No O'Dowd epilogue. No Trailblazers' three-peat.

All three coaches lamented the disappointment — how thrilling it would have been to watch all those talented athletes under the simmering spotlight.

But each coach recognized the bigger picture — health and safety. They also found silver linings in ending on a high note.

Sheldon coach Joey Rollings focused on how his team inspired a community to keep them in the tournament, and how the Huskies reciprocated with a likewise effort, without practicing for three days.

"My kids never quit," Rollings told the Bee's Davidson. "We got to go out on an exciting note. We wish we could play another game, but we can't control that. Our kids seem to understand. They're disappointed, but kids are resilient." 

Richie had a similar message for his Dragons, who featured seven seniors.

"A lot of the kids were very upset," Richie said. "They're hurt. Disappointed. I tried to convey that they had a great season. It's disappointing it ended that way, but don't let things you can't control get you down. Besides that, when we focus on our last game, it couldn't have gone any better. If we played like that in the NorCal or state finals, we definitely would have had a shot."

Teams took their best shot at Sierra Canyon all season, Chevalier said. The Trailblazers had a giant "X" on their back from Day One.

Despite that target they finished 30-4, No. 15 in the final MaxPreps national rankings and won section and regional titles.

"It's always great to win your last game and the way we did was amazing," Chevalier said. "We would have loved to be able and play that last game to try to three-peat as state champion. But sometimes life takes priority over sport. We want our country and this world to be safe.

"All that said, going 30-4 this season, starting in China and going all over the U.S. with a big target on our back is a great testament to who we are as a team. I'm super proud of how they reacted to all they had to deal with, and then to play our best basketball at the end of the season was very special. It is a very special group."
High school softball: Career strikeout leaders with 1,500 or more punchouts - HIGHSCORE
High school softball: Career strikeout leaders with 1,500 or more punchouts
When it comes to unbreakable records, Hillary Phillips of Ider (Ala.) and her 2,463 career strikeouts might be the toughest to top. With the 2010 move of the pitching rubber back from 40 feet to 43 feet, strikeouts have been harder to come by, thus making Phillips' total the Mount Everest of high school softball records.

The closest any pitcher has come to threatening Phillips' mark in the past decade is Annie Willis, who finished with 1,975 strikeouts in 2017. However, Willis played six years (same as Phillips) and still comes up nearly 500 strikeouts short. Consider that the highest strikeout total during the 2021 season was 420 strikeouts by Hannah Price of Rogers (Florence, Ala.).

Phillips tops MaxPreps list of high school softball pitchers with over 1,500 career strikeouts. And while Phillips' mark is certainly impressive, Alicia Hollowell's career total might be more so.

A four-year starter at Fairfield (Calif.), Hollowell averaged 582 strikeouts a season. She also averaged 15.7 strikeouts per game during a 131-17 career. Anna Thompson, No. 3 on the career strikeouts list, comes in next with 13.0 strikeouts per game during a 151-27 career.

Michele Granger of Valencia (Placentia, Calif.) was the first pitcher to notch more 1,500 career strikeouts (when not counting fall and spring/summer seasons combined). She finished her career in 1988 with 1,635 strikeouts - which was 511 strikeouts more than previous record holder Samantha Ford of Newhall (Hart), who had 1,124 from 1982-85.

Granger held the record until 1992 when Michelle Martin of Columbus (Columbus Junction, Iowa) finished in 1992 with 1,781 strikeouts over a five-year career. Paige Stamp of Lisbon (Iowa) took over the top spot in 1996 with 1,975 strikeouts and Jen Bice of Woodward-Granger (Iowa) took her place in 1999 with 2,175. Hollowell moved the bar to 2,328 in 2002 and Phillips claimed No. 1 in 2009.

Sources for the list include the National Federation of High Schools Record Book, state association record books, MaxPreps leaderboards, Cal-Hi Sports Record Book by Mark and Nelson Tennis and research with newspapers.com.
Rachel Fox, Fort Bend Christian Academy
File photo by Michael Henderson
Rachel Fox, Fort Bend Christian Academy
All-Time high school softball strikeout career leaders

HiIlary Phillips
Career Total: 2,463
School: Ider (Ala.)
Years: 2004-09
Highest Single Season Total: 550 (2006)

Alicia Hollowell
Career Total: 2,328
School: Fairfield (Calif.)
Years: 1999-2002
Highest Single Season Total: 641 (2000), 636 (2001), 559 (2002)

Anna Thompson
Career Total: 2,322
School: Grissom (Huntsville, Ala.)
Years: 2003-06
Highest Single Season Total: 657 (2006), 613 (2004)

Sammy Snygg
Career Total:
2,208
School: North Polk (Alleman, Iowa)
Years: 2005-09
Highest Single Season Total: 472 (2009), 451 (2005), 450 (2007), 437 (2008),

Jen Bice
Career Total: 2,175
School: Woodward-Granger (Woodward, Iowa)
Years: 1996-99
Highest Single Season Total: 570 (1997)

Meagan Novotny
Career Total: 2,132
School: Turkey Valley (Jackson Junction, Iowa)
Years: 2004-08
Highest Single Season Total: 506 (2008)

LaTonya Coates
Career Total: 1,999
School: Bangor (Mich.)
Years: 1998-2001
Highest Single Season Total: 553 (1999)

Lauren Seibert
Career Total: 1,979
School: West Morgan (Trinity, Ala.)
Years: 2004-09
Highest Single Season Total: 580 (2008), 576 (2009)

Paige Stamp
Career Total: 1,975
School: Lisbon (Iowa)
Years: 1993-96
Highest Single Season Total: 590 (1996)

Annie Willis
Career Total: 1,975
School: Westminster Christian (Huntsville, Ala.)
Years: 2012-17
Highest Single Season Total: 583 (2016)

Montana Fouts
Career Total: 1,964
School: East Carter (Grayson, Ky.)
Years: 2012-18
Highest Single Season Total: 481 (2018), 479 (2016)

Cara Goodwin
Career Total: 1,929
School: Good Hope (Cullman, Ala.)
Years: 2009-13
Highest Single Season Total: 525 (2012)

Lindsey Fadnek
Career Total: 1,925
School: Coalfield (Tenn.)
Years: 2009-12
Highest Single Season Total: 567 (2012)

Alexis Silkwood
Career Total: 1,907
School: Marquette Catholic (Alton, Ill.)
Years: 2010-13
Highest Single Season Total: 501 (2011), 500 (2012), 463 (2010), 443 (2013)

Rachelle Fico

Career Total: 1,886
School: Masuk (Monroe, Conn.)
Years: 2006-09
Highest Single Season Total: 486 (2007, 2008), 482 (2009), 432 (2006)

Dallas Escobedo
Career Total: 1,882
School: St. Mary's (Phoenix)
Years: 2007-10
Highest Single Season Total: 510 (2010)

Kirsten Allen
Career Total: 1,865
School: Ryle (Union, Ky.)
Years: 2004-08
Highest Single Season Total: 478 (2008, 2006), 451 (2007)

Cara Law
Career Total: 1,843
School: Saks (Anniston, Ala.)
Years: 2005-09
Highest Single Season Total: 512 (2006)

Sarah Sigrest
Career Total: 1,816
School: Daphne (Ala.)
Years: 2004-08
Highest Single Season Total: 622 (2008)

Megan Rhodes
Career Total: 1,807
School: Lipscomb Academy (Nashville, Tenn.)
Years: 2001-04
Highest Single Season Total: 502 (2004)

Michelle Martin
Career Total: 1,781
School: Columbus (Columbus Junction, Iowa)
Years: 1988-92
Highest Single Season Total: 513 (1991)

Stacy Delaney
Career Total: 1,741
School: Freeland (Mich.)
Years: 2002-05
Highest Single Season Total: 558 (2005)

Chelsea Sundberg
Career Total: 1,736
School: Olivet (Mich.)
Years: 2007-10
Highest Single Season Total: 597 (2010)

Holly Currie
Career Total: 1,730
School: Pisgah (Ala.)
Years: 2000-03
Highest Single Season Total: 567 (2002)

Brittany Barnhill
Career Total: 1,715
School: Northwest (Justin, Texas)
Years: 2004-07
Highest Single Season Total: 485 (2007)

Leanna Johnson
Career Total: 1,714
School: Brantley (Ala.)
Years: 2013-18
Highest Single Season Total: 472 (2017)

Andrea Palmer

Career Total: 1,704
School: Waterloo (Ala.)
Years: 2001-2005
Highest Single Season Total: 501 (2005)

Katie Brown
Career Total: 1,688
School: Spirit Lake (Iowa)
Years: 2003-06
Highest Single Season Total: 444 (2006)

Taylor West

Career Total: 1,664
School: Saks (Anniston, Ala.)
Years: 2008-13
Highest Single Season Total: 610 (2013)

Aspen Wesley
Career Total: 1,651
School: Neshoba Central (Philadelphia, Miss.)
Years: 2015-19
Highest Single Season Total: 349 (2017), 335 (2019)

Lindsey Dunlap

Career Total: 1,644
School: Hueytown (Ala.)
Years: 2004-08
Highest Single Season Total: 440 (2008)

Kayla English
Career Total: 1,642
School: Fort Worth Christian (North Richland Hills, Texas)
Years: 2008-11
Highest Single Season Total: 522 (2011)

Erica Strutz
Career Total: 1,637
School: Hartland (Mich.)
Years: 1993-96
Highest Single Season Total: 493 (1996)

Penny Cope
Career Total: 1,637
School: Carlisle (Iowa)
Years: 1994-97
Highest Single Season Total: 505 (1996)

Michele Granger
Career Total: 1,635
School: Valencia (Placentia, Calif.)
Years: 1985-88
Highest Single Season Total: 509 (1987)

Jenna Ignowski
Career Total: 1,625
School: Niles (Mich.)
Years: 2006-09
Highest Single Season Total: 498 (2009)

Kelly Schade
Career Total: 1,619
School: Clarke (Osceola, Iowa)
Years: 1991-95
Highest Single Season Total: 506 (1995)

Katie Bertelsen
Career Total: 1,619
School: Monmouth United (Monmouth, Ill.)
Years: 2008-11
Highest Single Season Total: 477 (2009)

Jordan Ingalls

Career Total: 1,603
School: Bolivar-Richburg (Bolivar, N.Y.)
Years: 2003-08
Highest Single Season Total: 361 (2006)

Samantha Hendrix
Career Total: 1,600
School: Madison Academy (Madison, Ala.)
Years: 2001-06
Highest Single Season Total: 377 (2006)

Meghan Harbuck
Career Total:
1,598
School: Baker (Mobile, Ala.)
Years: 2003-07
Highest Single Season Total: 542 (2007)

Rachel Fox
Career Total: 1,585
School: Fort Bend Christian Academy (Sugar Land, Texas)
Years: 2007-10
Highest Single Season Total: 438 (2010)

Anjelica Selden

Career Total: 1,552
School: Vanden (Fairfield, Calif.)
Years: 2001-04
Highest Single Season Total: 536 (2004)

Hilary Mavromat
Career Total: 1,551
School: Scottsboro (Ala.)
Years: 2006-10
Highest Single Season Total: 380 (2007)

Tammy Nielsen
Career Total: 1,548
School: Fremont (Neb.)
Years: 1997-2000
Highest Single Season Total: 463 (2000), 444 (1999)

Chelsea Wallace

Career Total: 1,548
School: Danville (Ky.)
Years: 2003-08
Highest Single Season Total: 404 (2008)

CheyAnne Gaskey
Career Total: 1,545
School: Butler County (Morgantown, Ky.)
Years: 2007-11
Highest Single Season Total: 434 (2010)

Kirsten Shortridge
Career Total: 1,544
School: Keller (Texas)
Years: 2003-06
Highest Single Season Total: 438 (2006)

Katie Layne
Career Total: 1,539
School: Hogan (Vallejo, Calif.)
Years: 1998-2001
Highest Single Season Total: 441 (1999)

Jessie Granger
Career Total: 1,536
School: Troy (Mich.)
Years: 2002-05
Highest Single Season Total: 449 (2005)

Becky Abner
Career Total: 1,533
School: North Laurel (London, Ky.)
Years: 2002-08
Highest Single Season Total: 365 (2000)

Erin Arevalo
Career Total: 1,518
School: East Union (Manteca, Calif.)
Years: 2005-08
Highest Single Season Total: 492 (2008)

Taran Alvelo
Career Total: 1,515
School: Bloom-Carroll (Carroll, Ohio)
Years: 2012-15
Highest Single Season Total: 368 (2012)

Mackenzie Stiles
Career Total: 1,507
School: Deposit (N.Y.)
Years: 2014-19
Highest Single Season Total: 362 (2019)

Lisa Fernandez
Career Total: 1,503
School: Saint Joseph (Lakewood, Calif.)
Years: 1986-89
Highest Single Season Total: 467 (1989)

Kelcie Matesa
Career Total: 1,501
School: Gillespie (Ill.)
Years: 2005-08
Highest Single Season Total: 443 (2005)

Chet Holmgren named 2020-21 HIGHSCORE Minnesota High School Basketball Player of the Year - HIGHSCORE
Chet Holmgren named 2020-21 MaxPreps Minnesota High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Chet Holmgren of Minnehaha Academy (Minneapolis) is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Minnesota High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 7-foot senior center helped the Redhawks go 20-1 en route to their fourth straight state title.

Holmgren averaged 20.8 points, 12.6 rebounds, 4.7 blocks and 4.5 assists per game while shooting 80 percent from the field.

The top-ranked senior prospect capped his prep career with 1,567 points, 964 rebounds and 456 blocked shots while Minnehaha Academy went 128-15 during his time with the program.

Gonzaga is considered the leader to land Holmgren, though Georgetown, Memphis, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio State remain in the mix.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team, which is scheduled to be released April 13.
Chet Holmgren was part of four state championship teams at Minnehaha Academy going back to his eighth grade year.
Photo by Josh Johnson
Chet Holmgren was part of four state championship teams at Minnehaha Academy going back to his eighth grade year.